2,160,761 research outputs found

    Quality Management System In Construction

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    This paper describes the Quality Management System (QMS) concept and its application in the construction industry. A misunderstanding among the construction players on the QMS concept has become the stumbling block for its successful implementation

    Quality management in construction projects

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    [Quality Management in Construction Projects by Abdul Razzak Rumane, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2011, 434 pp, ISBN 9781439838716] Issues of quality management, quality control and performance against specification have long been the focus of various business sectors. Recently there has been an additional drive to achieve the continuous improvement and customer satisfaction promised by the 20th-century ‘gurus’ some six or seven decades ago. The engineering and construction industries have generally taken somewhat longer than their counterparts in the manufacturing, service and production sectors to achieve these espoused levels of quality. The construction and engineering sectors stand to realize major rewards from better managing quality in projects. More effort is being put into instructing future participants in the industry as well as assisting existing professionals. This book comes at an opportune time

    Strategic development of the built environment through international construction, quality and productivity management

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    This thesis presents a coherent, sustained and substantial contribution to the advancement of knowledge or application of knowledge or both in the field of construction management and economics. More specifically, this thesis outlines the strategic development of the built environment through lessons from international construction, quality and productivity management. The strategic role of construction in economic development is emphasized. It describes the contributions transnational construction firms made towards modern-day construction project management practices globally. It establishes the relationship between construction quality and economic development and fosters a better understanding of total quality management and quality management systems in enhancing construction industry performance. Additionally, it prescribes lessons from the manufacturing industry for construction productivity and identifies the amount of carbon emissions reduced through lean construction management practices to alleviate the generally adverse effects of the built environment on global climate change. It highlights the need for integrated management systems to enhance quality and productivity for sustainable development in the built environment. The thesis is an account of how the built environment has evolved, leveraging on lessons from international construction, quality and productivity management for improvements over the past two decades

    Quality management system and construction performance

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    This paper discusses the level of effectiveness of quality principles and quality management system implementation and the relationship with performance of ISO9000 certified Indonesian contractors. It also discusses the statistical relationship between quality management systems (QMSs) and key performance indicators (KPIs) amongst a large sample of Indonesian construction companies. Data collected is from questionnaire surveys involving Quality Managers, Managers, and Project and Site Engineers representing 77 different companies. Results indicate that even though some contractors have not yet effectively implemented an effective QMS, most of the KPIs of respondent companies are still at the level of high performance. The statistical results show that the relationship between variables of ISO9000 QMS principles and contractors’ KPIs is significant. These results suggest that an increment in the implementation level of QMS principles can increase KPIs, however that much effort is still required for Indonesian contractors to fully effectively implement QMS principles and thus substantially improve performance against KPIs

    Indicators for measuring satisfaction towards design quality of buildings

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    Design quality is an important component in measuring satisfaction towards total product quality (TPQ) of buildings, the product of construction projects. Design Quality Indicator (DQI), developed by the Construction Industry Council (CIC) in the UK looking at three quality fields, i.e. functionality, build quality, and impact of building in measuring the quality of design embodied in the buildings through feedback and perceptions of all stakeholders involved in the production and use of buildings. Design quality is always a major concern in the Malaysian construction industry. With inspiration from this DQI, this study was carried out to identify indicators for measuring the satisfaction towards design quality of buildings and to evaluate the suitability of the indicators for application in the context of Malaysian construction industry. Through literature survey, 32 indicators of design quality were identified and grouped into the three design quality fields. A questionnaire survey was carried out among Malaysian construction professionals (architects, engineers, quantity surveyors, contractors and developers) to assess the identified design quality indicators in terms of their relevance and significance in the context of construction industry in Malaysia. The survey reveals that access, natural lighting, access and use, structure element, landscape, finishes, location, external environment, urban and social integration and noise are among the design quality indicators that were perceived as the most important to be looked at. In overall, all the indicators are relevant for adoption in the Malaysian construction industry to measure the satisfaction towards design quality of buildings

    Ecological Quality of the Construction Investment Project

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    The aim of the article is to indicate the possibility of assessing the quality of construction solutions for investment projects by analyzing their environmental performance, also formulated as ecological quality. The concept of the environmental performance of a construction project was defined as adapting the solutions applied throughout the whole life cycle to comply with the environment. The life cycle of the construction project begins articulating building needs, then the concept and feasibility study of the project appears at the beginning of the life cycle of the project. This is followed by the design of the building and executive processes. The next stages of the project life cycle are the implementations of logistic and construction processes, which end with putting the project into service. The operation phase ends with a project closure (usually demolition or deconstruction). An attempt was made to specify the criteria for assessing the ecological quality of construction investment projects in individual phases of their cycle. The investigations were based on available literature and practical experience of the authors of the study. It was also stressed that the perspective of the subject should be taken into account in the environmental assessment. This is due to the fact that the processes of shaping the object in the program, project and implementation phases are related to operational processes and the liquidation phase. It was emphasized that each of the stakeholders should perceive all stages of the construction project cycle

    Why small and medium construction enterprises do not employ six sigma

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    Six sigma (6σ) is a powerful business strategy which is aimed at increasing customer satisfaction and profitability by improving the quality of products and services. Many organisations have implemented 6σ and achieved significant levels of success. Successful implementation of 6σ leads to outcomes that would be welcome in the construction industry, given its reputation of suboptimal performance. The construction industry relies heavily on small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Any improvement in construction SMEs would lead to improvements in the construction industry as a whole. Against this background, a survey was undertaken to establish whether construction SMEs used 6σ and to identify factors affecting the adoption of this business strategy. It was found that none of the SMEs in the sample used 6σ. The reasons given for not employing 6σ, in descending order of importance, were: lack of knowledge about 6σ programme; lack of resources (human, time, money); 6σ programme not required by customers; other sufficient quality system in use; 6σ provides no perceived benefits; and end users not prepared to pay for 6σ programme. These reasons can be challenged when a critical analysis of innovation in the external environment within which construction SMEs operate, trends in the mode of delivery of construction industry products, trends in performance measurement in the construction industry and the flexibility of 6σ as a quantitative approach to managing quality. Construction industry stakeholders need to think about 6σ critically and make informed decisions about its role in the construction industry quality management agenda
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