1,470 research outputs found

    Cinephilia and Philosophia: Or, Why I Don't Show The Matrix in Philosophy 101

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    The shelves of film and philosophy books should have made it considerably easier to teach with films in introductory philosophy classes, and certainly many philosophers have found them useful. However, shortcomings of many of these pop culture volumes (which I discuss in the next section) make these works rarely useful in the classroom. I propose instead a new model for how to teach film in a philosophy class. The model develops the virtues inherent in cinephilia and connects those virtues to the good life

    Deja viewing?: videographic experiments in intertextual film studies

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    Cinephilia and online communities

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    The accelerated development of digital media over the past few decades has led to a theoretical overhaul of media classification. The rise of the Internet has been designated as a historical dividing point between the age of ‘old’ media and that of ‘new’ media. Old media are unified objects of transmission, and new media are digitally converted and integrated media experiences enabled by the Internet and other digital technology. A debate currently wages over new media’s potential for meaningful positive change. Advocates argue that the transition to digital media signals a force for globalism and democracy, whereas skeptics see little evidence for these claims. However, the progressivism of new media comes into clearer focus when applied to a narrow field of study. The proposed research integrates new media and film studies, focusing on cinephilia, a mode of film consumption that has blended a lofty passion for cinema with intellectual engagement with film history and scholarship. Drawing on the new media concepts of the online knowledge community, weak-tie activism, and peer production, this paper argues that online interactivity, the diminishment of costs for mass organization, and the ease with which films can be digitally circulated have had a substantial progressive impact on cinephilia. The research also touches on the overlooked communal and organizational capabilities of online file sharing, a practice which remains simplistically assessed in terms of its legality.Faculty Mentor: Navarro, Vinicius; Dalle Vacche, Angela - Committee Member/Second Reader; Reilly, J.C. - Committee Member/Second Reade

    Cinephilia

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    This anthology explores new periods, practices and definitions of what it means to love the cinema. The essays demonstrate that beyond individualist immersion in film, typical of the cinephilia as it was popular from the 1950s to the 1970s, a new type of cinephilia has emerged since the 1980s, practiced by a new generation of equally devoted, but quite differently networked cinephilies. They obsess over the nuances of a Douglas Sirk or Ingmar Bergman film; they revel in books such as François Truffaut's Hitchcock; they happily subscribe to the Sundance Channel-they are the rare breed known as cinephiles. Though much has been made of the classic era of cinephilia from the 1950s to the 1970s, Cinephilia documents the latest generation of cinephiles and their use of new technologies. With the advent of home theaters, digital recordings devices, and online film communities, cinephiles today pursue their dedication to film outside of institutional settings. A radical new history of film culture, Cinephilia breaks new ground for students and scholars alike

    Jean-Luc Godard\u27s Breathless: The revelation of filmmaking as cinephilia

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    Auteur, Jean-Luc Godard directed his first feature film Breathless (A bout de soufflé) in 1959 after a decade of working as a film critic for the contentious journal, Cahiers du Cinema. Central to my thesis is the assertion that Breathless is contentious in critical dimension to Godard’s literary criticism. It takes a certain breed of individual with a genuine passion for the state of the French film industry to sustain a politically charged critique of cinema from literary film criticism to filmmaking. The breed of individual is known as a cinephile – an avid moviegoer who may also engage in critical activities in cine-club cultures. A very early, influential example of this cine-culture is Les Cahiers du Cinema, of which Godard was a member and critic of. The scholarship on cinephilia circumscribes literary film criticism as the central outlet of cinephilic expression. Godard’s Breathless can also be categorised as film criticism and therefore, an example of cinpehilia. I argue that Breathless, through it’s very deliberate intertextual construction, aims to interrogate and critique the classical Hollywood production, presenting a continuity of expression from literary criticism to filmmaking. By applying the framework of metatextual analysis to Breathless, I will contend that Breathless as an expression of film criticism, is therefore, an expression of cinephilia

    The Passionate Eye of Angelina Buracci, Pedagogue

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    This paper examines the contribution of Angelina Buracci, a young feminist and pacifist pedagogue, to the early discourse on film in Italy. Published in 1916, her book Cinematografo educativo [educational cinema] is a brilliant counter to the contemporary representation of women filmgoers in the writings of several Italian male modernist intellectuals. Their construction, between 1908 and 1930, of a new canon of spectatorship centered on the figure of the male cinephile and bears traces of a gendered discourse. In the minds of these intellectuals, the “new spectator” was evoked as an alternative to an earlier, female model of spectatorship. Yet, despite their dismissal of women’s significant presence in the early discursive field, a few women writers had already begun carving out their own space in reflections on cinema. Buracci’s essay is an exemplary document in this respect. Not only does it demonstrate the author’s familiarity with the experience of cinema, but it also reveals an extraordinary independence of thought

    Learning to love the movies : puzzles, participation, and cinephilia in interwar European film magazines

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    Most scholars would agree that cinephilia results not simply from a spontaneous love of movies but historically has also been inseparable from processes of legitimization, audience training, and formations of taste. Yet we still know little about the deeper history of cinephilia's emergence: how audiences learned to love the movies and why. This article considers one site for thinking about this question during the “first wave” of cinephilia in the 1920s, namely the puzzle contest as it developed and proliferated in the new landscape of popular magazines in England, France, Germany, and other European countries. Culminating in a discussion of the Viennese magazine Mein Film, this article examines the media-historical and cultural contexts of photographic puzzles to show how they figured in a broader program of participatory and playful pedagogy by which readers could learn to frame film knowledge, film affect, and film experience in the context of an emerging European star system.Publisher PDFPeer reviewe
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