75,388 research outputs found

    Visualization of database structures for information retrieval

    Get PDF
    This paper describes the Book House system, which is designed to support children's information retrieval in libraries as part of their education. It is a shareware program available on CD‐ROM or floppy disks, and comprises functionality for database searching as well as for classifying and storing book information in the database. The system concept is based on an understanding of children's domain structures and their capabilities for categorization of information needs in connection with their activities in schools, in school libraries or in public libraries. These structures are visualized in the interface by using metaphors and multimedia technology. Through the use of text, images and animation, the Book House encourages children ‐ even at a very early age ‐ to learn by doing in an enjoyable way, which plays on their previous experiences with computer games. Both words and pictures can be used for searching; this makes the system suitable for all age groups. Even children who have not yet learned to read properly can, by selecting pictures, search for and find those books they would like to have read aloud. Thus, at the very beginning of their school life, they can learn to search for books on their own. For the library community, such a system will provide an extended service which will increase the number of children's own searches and also improve the relevance, quality and utilization of the book collections in the libraries. A market research report on the need for an annual indexing service for books in the Book House format is in preparation by the Danish Library Centre A/S

    Women Poets, Child Readers

    Get PDF

    Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books 48 (04) 1994

    Get PDF
    published or submitted for publicatio

    Dadaism, Surrealism, and the Unconscious

    Get PDF
    This paper explores two important, twentieth-century art movements, Dadaism and Surrealism and the use of primitivist representations and their relation to the art emerging from the unconscious. By giving some examples, it is argued that the influence of 'Primitive' art is strongly felt in the art of many artists of these movements. One must also include the growing interest of psychoanalytic studies, especially in the works of the period of Freud and Jung. The Dadaist artists created their art through the irrational approach towards nature and a 'primitive' attitude to the environment, the art of children and of the insane. On the other hand, the Surrealists approached the unconscious through automatism and dreams. These artists also explored the ancient human past and what is termed as the 'primitive' unconscious.peer-reviewe

    Critical analysis of Chicana/o children\u27s literature: Moving from cultural differences to sociopolitical realities

    Get PDF
    In an effort to humanize the curriculum, to honor student voice and identity, and tap the cultural and linguistic knowledge of our students, two teacher educators engage their preservice teachers in the collective use of Chicana/o children’s literature. The authors describe a series of questions they designed in order to scaffold teachers\u27 ability to analyze the extent to which literature stereotypes Chicano/a children, rejects their linguistic realities, and/or minimizes existing inequities. A series of assignments challenge preservice teachers\u27 simplistic conceptualizations of inequality. In addition, they create a critical literacy poster/lesson plan, which can empower youth by simultaneously fostering academic competence and engaging them in social action

    Thats classified: class politics and adolescence in twin peaks

    Full text link
    Twin Peaks arguably paved the way for the television programmes currently popular with adolescent audiences, like The OC and Veronica Mars and, in it, many of the issues and representational strategies in those later programmes have their earlier manifestation. Specifically, the Twin Peaks plotline evinces a set of cultural anxieties about class-difference. Twin Peaks creates a cultural microcosm of American society that is paradoxically writ large by the limited parameters of an isolated community. Within a constricted space, characters are depicted as both individuals and as archetypes of a class location.<br /

    Analysis of a Colonial Alphabet Book

    Get PDF
    This essay analyzes a non-canonical alphabet book written in the nineteenth century. The Colonial Alphabet For The Nursery was written for the child audience during the Victorian era. It associates a word with each letter of the alphabet, and the word is used in a sentence describing its corresponding illustration. This paper explains how the book portrays Great Britain as a world superpower by showing the other countries as poor and insignificant. Much of this alphabet book teaches children the various stereotypes about numerous ethnicities. This allows for them to grow up with misconceptions about diverse racial groups. This essay describes how the text encompasses the theme of nature to educate the child reader on the dominance of Britain

    A summary of research relating to reading in the intermediate grades

    Full text link
    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a method of quick perception with geography vocabulary to see if; (a) quick perception accelerates growth in comprehension, (b) effects speed of reading, and (c) improves reading ability. Materials used: (1) Vocabulary selected from: a) Atwood, The Americas, b) McConnel, Living in the Americas, c) Smith, World Folk. (2) Durrell-Sullivan Achievement Tests, Intermediate Forms A and B. (3) Oral Reading Tests for Speed from the "Durrell Analysis of Reading Difficulty". (4) Silent Reading and Vocabulary Inventory Tests constructed by the writer. (5) Lantern slide projector; screen; words and phrases typed on amber cellphone, faced with red carbon paper, enclosed in glass slides, hinged with tape at the top [TRUNCATED

    Negotiating Audiences: Confronting Social Issues in Theatre/or Young Audiences

    Get PDF
    Resume: Cet article examine les problĂšmes pratiques, esthĂ©tiques et idĂ©ologiques auxquels sont confrontĂ©es les troupes de thĂ©Ăątre qui produisent des piĂšces portant sur I\u27expĂ©rience vĂ©cue des jeunes et qui les prĂ©sentent en milieu scolaire Si I\u27Ă©cole permet I\u27accĂšs Ă  la culture thĂ©Ăątrale Ă  des groupes d\u27enfants dĂ©favorisĂ©s, il n\u27en reste pas moins que cet accĂšs est contrĂŽlĂ© par des adultes (commissions scolaires, enseignants, parents et bailleurs de fonds). À cet Ă©gard, l\u27expĂ©rience de deux troupes, Ie Catalyst Theatre d\u27Edmonton et la Company of Sirens de Toronto, montre les difficultĂ©s que soulĂšvent l\u27exploration de sujets comme la violence Ă  la maison et les abus sexuels. Summary: This paper deals with the practical, aesthetic, and ideological problems facing theatre groups who choose to produce issue-based plays for young audiences in schools. In socio-economic terms, performing in schools makes theatre available to a larger cross section of young people, however, a company\u27s access to these audiences is ultimately mediated by adults (school boards, teachers, parents and funding agencies). The paper compares the experiences of two different theatre groups — Catalyst Theatre (Edmonton) and the Company of Sirens (Toronto) — whose plays for young audiences tackled issues of sexual abuse and domestic violence. The paper concludes with a consideration of the challenges and rewards of TYA (Theatre for Young Audiences) more generally
    • 

    corecore