1,623,465 research outputs found

    Evaluation of the impact of National Breast Cancer Foundation-funded research

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    © Copyright 2014. The Medical Journal of Australia - reproduced with permission.Objective: To evaluate the impact of the National Breast Cancer Foundation’s (NBCF’s) research investment. Design and participants: Surveys based on the Payback Framework were sent to chief investigators involved in research funded by the NBCF during 1995–2012; a bibliometric analysis of NBCF-funded publications in 2006–2010 was conducted; and a purposive, stratified sample of case studies was obtained. Main outcome measures: Research impact on knowledge production, the research system, informing policy, product development and broader health and economic benefits. Results: Of 242 surveys sent, 153 (63%) were returned. The average impact of journals in which NBCF publications appeared was double that of world publications. Seventy surveys (46%) reported career progression, and 185 higher degrees were obtained or expected, including 121 PhDs. One hundred and one grants (66%) produced tools that built capacity across the research system, and research teams leveraged an additional $1.40 in funding for every dollar invested. Fifteen applied grants and one basic grant impacted on policy. Ten basic and four applied grants led to the development of drugs, prognostic tools or diagnostic technologies. Twenty applied and two basic grants led to changes in practice and behaviour of health care staff, consumers and the public, with further impacts anticipated. Case studies provided illustrations of high impact. Conclusions: NBCF’s strategy of investing in a mixed portfolio of research areas and mechanisms encouraged a broad range of impacts across all Payback categories. The impacts from basic research tended to focus on knowledge production and drug development; while applied research generated greater impacts within the other Payback categories. The funding of shared infrastructure stimulated impact across the research system

    Humphrey Center News: Spring 1985 v. 1, no. 1

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    Newsletter of the Hubert H. Humphrey Cancer Research Center at Boston University School of Medicine

    Humphrey Center News: Summer 1985 v. 1, no. 2

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    Newsletter of the Hubert H. Humphrey Cancer Research Center at Boston University School of Medicine

    Institute of Cancer Research

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    Humphrey Center News: Spring 1989 v. 4, no. 1

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    Newsletter of the Hubert H. Humphrey Cancer Research Center at Boston University School of Medicine

    Humphrey Center News: Fall 1987 v. 2, no. 2

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    Newsletter of the Hubert H. Humphrey Cancer Research Center at Boston University School of Medicine

    Humphrey Center News: Spring 1988 v. 3, no. 1

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    Newsletter of the Hubert H. Humphrey Cancer Research Center at Boston University School of Medicine

    Humphrey Center News: Fall 1988 v. 3, no. 2

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    Newsletter of the Hubert H. Humphrey Cancer Research Center at Boston University School of Medicine

    How prevalent is a cancer-protective lifestyle? Adherence to the 2018 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research cancer prevention recommendations in Switzerland.

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    Population monitoring of lifestyle behaviors that are crucial as risk and protective factors for major chronic diseases is vital for the identification of priority areas for public health. In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) cancer prevention recommendations in Switzerland, overall and by selected sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics. Data from the population-based, cross-sectional survey menuCH were used. We constructed a score reflecting adherence to the 2018 WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations. Multinomial logistic regression models were fitted to investigate the association of sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics with the level of adherence to the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations. The least frequently met cancer prevention recommendations were the ones on fiber intake (met by 13.7%), red and processed meat (25.4%), and ultra-processed food (33.3%) consumption, while the recommendation on physical activity was met by almost 80%. Women and individuals with tertiary education were more likely to have a score of ≥5 (as a reflection of adherence to the cancer prevention recommendations), compared to men or those who completed secondary education, respectively. Current smokers were less likely to have a score of ≥5, compared to never smokers. A high proportion of the population in Switzerland was found to not adhere closely to the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations. Differences were detected based on sociodemographic characteristics. Education and policy actions are needed to facilitate the adoption of a cancer-protective lifestyle
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