2,483 research outputs found

    Hosford-Abernethy Bicycle and Pedestrian Connections: An Alternative Routes Analysis Linking SE Clinton Street and the Eastbank Esplanade

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    SE Clinton is a popular bicycle route for commuter, utilitarian and recreational bicyclists that fails to provide a safe and direct connection to the Eastbank Esplanade and downtown Portland. Furthermore, residents in the Hosford-Abernethy and Brooklyn neighborhoods do not have a safe bicycle and pedestrian connection to access the Eastbank Esplanade. This gap in the bicycle and pedestrian network must be removed to serve the needs of bicyclists and pedestrians. This project presents four alternative bicycle and pedestrian routes that connect the Eastbank Esplanade and the SE Clinton bikeway through the Central Eastside Industrial District. Each alternative, with improvements, is evaluated based on five criteria, and a preferred route is recommended. This area is dominated by industrial land uses. Particular hazards to bicyclists and pedestrians include an active main line railroad corridor, a high volume of heavy truck traffic, and wide intersections designed to accommodate trucks. Recent literature and technical documents were reviewed to guide our assessment of the study area and formulation of five evaluation criteria. Existing conditions were documented, and four route alternatives were identified. Each route is described in full detail in the study. A preferred route was selected based on the evaluation criteria. The preferred route utilizes existing bicycle routes, wide sidewalks and signalized intersections, and avoids the most hazardous streets and intersections. A long term recommendation is made as well, which is largely dependent on changing land uses and the introduction of light rail in the railroad corridor. This project was conducted under the supervision of Connie Ozawa and Deborah Howe

    Riverside, Paso Robles Urban Design Concept Plans

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    Iowa Roads : Historical Sketch of Development in Administration 1838-1929, 1959

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    An brief history of the developments in the Iowa highway administration between 1838 and 1929

    The Lincoln Highway\u27s Seedling Mile

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    The best of its kind in the West: A history of Columbus, Nebraska, 1900-1910

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    The first decade of the twentieth century marked Columbus, Nebraska’s transition from a frontier town to a small midwestem city. During those ten years, the population increased from 3,522 to 5,014, the labor force composition changed, and residents, goaded by Columbus Weekly Telegram editor Edgar Howard, began to think more about the appearance and sanitary condition of the town. The rapidly growing community was soon hard-pressed to provide its citizens with fuel and electrical power to operate an expanding residential and street lighting system. Promoters tried to harness the Loup River’s current to provide that power, but economic conditions did not favor the project. The electric light station could not provide enough power for the streetlights and business and residential lighting. Residents began taking exception to the poor condition of the city’s streets and sidewalks, and those issues reached crisis points when Columbus qualified for free city mail delivery. Automobile enthusiasts began adding their voices to the demand for good roads at mid-decade, but in doing so, created new forms of safety hazards. Along with the automobile, increased usage of the telephone during the decade gave people more opportunities for interaction, and began to change the way people, especially those living in the rural areas, conducted their business. Although these devices were lauded as means to end the isolation of rural people, during the first years after their introduction, they were enjoyed far more frequently by town-dwellers

    Sioux City's Grand Avenue Viaduct, 1936-2010

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    For almost 75 years, the Grand Avenue Viaduct (known today as the Gordon Drive Viaduct) has been a familiar feature of Sioux City's urban landscape. With the exception of bridges over the Mississippi River, the Grand Avenue Viaduct is Iowa's longest grade separation as well as its longest bridge. For nearly a mile, from the eastern suburbs west to the central business district, the viaduct carries Gordon Drive and the city route of U.S. 20 over the Floyd River valley, which includes the remnants of the city's famed stockyards and the South Bottoms neighborhood, as well as a maze of railroad tracks and the present channel of the Floyd River. Constructed in 1937 and known simply as "The Viaduct" to local residents, the massive structure is as fundamental to Sioux City as were its stockyards just a few decades ago

    Iowa and her Roads, 1915.

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    A short study course prepared by the Iowa Highway Commission for the Good Roads Committee of the Iowa Federation of Women's Clubs

    Maine Highways, December 1932

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    https://digitalmaine.com/maine_highways_magazine/1007/thumbnail.jp
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