9,613 research outputs found

    The temporality of rhetoric: the spatialization of time in modern criticism

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    Every conception of criticism conceals a notion of time which informs the manner in which the critic conceives of history, representation and criticism itself. This thesis reveals the philosophies of time inherent in certain key modern critical concepts: allegory, irony and the sublime. Each concept opens a breach in time, a disruption of chronology. In each case this gap or aporia is emphatically closed, elided or denied. Taking the philosophy of time elaborated by Giorgio Agamben as an introductory proposition, my argument turns in Chapter One to the allegorical temporality which Walter Benjamin sees as the time of photography. The second chapter examines the aesthetics of the sublime as melancholic or mournful untimeliness. In Chapter Three, Paul de Man's conception of irony provides an exemplary instance of the denial of this troubling temporal predicament. In opposition to the foreclosure of the disturbing temporalities of criticism, history and representation, the thesis proposes a fundamental rethinking of the philosophy of time as it relates to these categories of reflection. In a reading of an inaugural meditation on the nature of time, and in examining certain key contemporary philosophical and critical texts, I argue for a critical attendance to that which eludes those modes of thought that attempt to map time as a recognizable and essentially spatial field. The Confessions of Augustine provide, in the fourth chapter, a model for thinking through the problems set up earlier: Augustine affords us, precisely, a means of conceiving of the gap or the interim. In the final chapter, this concept is developed with reference to the criticism of Arnold and Eliot, the fiction of Virginia Woolf and the philosophy of cinema derived from Deleuze and Lyotard. In conclusion, the philosophical implications of the thesis are placed in relation to a conception of the untimeliness of death

    TOWARDS AN UNDERSTANDING OF EFFORTFUL FUNDRAISING EXPERIENCES: USING INTERPRETATIVE PHENOMENOLOGICAL ANALYSIS IN FUNDRAISING RESEARCH

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    Physical-activity oriented community fundraising has experienced an exponential growth in popularity over the past 15 years. The aim of this study was to explore the value of effortful fundraising experiences, from the point of view of participants, and explore the impact that these experiences have on people’s lives. This study used an IPA approach to interview 23 individuals, recognising the role of participants as proxy (nonprofessional) fundraisers for charitable organisations, and the unique organisation donor dynamic that this creates. It also bought together relevant psychological theory related to physical activity fundraising experiences (through a narrative literature review) and used primary interview data to substantiate these. Effortful fundraising experiences are examined in detail to understand their significance to participants, and how such experiences influence their connection with a charity or cause. This was done with an idiographic focus at first, before examining convergences and divergences across the sample. This study found that effortful fundraising experiences can have a profound positive impact upon community fundraisers in both the short and the long term. Additionally, it found that these experiences can be opportunities for charitable organisations to create lasting meaningful relationships with participants, and foster mutually beneficial lifetime relationships with them. Further research is needed to test specific psychological theory in this context, including self-esteem theory, self determination theory, and the martyrdom effect (among others)

    The artist and the regime: Karel Kachyňa and four decades of Czechoslovak film

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    The Artist and the Regime explores the works of Czech filmmaker Karel Kachyňa during four decades of the communist regime in Czechoslovakia. Despite being a prolific filmmaker who made over forty feature films across five decades, Kachyňa’s works outside the 1960s and the Czechoslovak New Wave have gone largely unnoticed in scholarship. This work challenges the uncertainty surrounding the reception of Kachyňa’s works in the context of a totalitarian regime and a nationalised film industry and offers the thesis that Kachyňa’s works provide a unique perspective on the communist era in Czechoslovakia. As such, this thesis engages with Kachyňa’s film poetics from the historical and analytical perspectives, as well as providing an examination of spectatorial theorising which comprises another aspect of film poetics and therefore contributes to knowledge in this field. This work presents Kachyňa’s unusual treatment of socialist realism from the outset of the communist era in Czechoslovakia in 1948, his approach to Army Film, his invocation of issues surrounding the concept of borders, his depiction of child narratives, his dealing with taboo subjects, his influence on and contribution to the New Wave movement, and his engagement with Holocaust narratives as evidence of an artist whose humanist poetics were at odds with his environment, despite working as an agent for the regime within a nationalised film industry. This paradoxical position offers an appreciation for individuals who experienced the trappings of the regime in Czechoslovakia during four decades of communist rule. By analysing a wide range of films in how they reflect and diverge from one another, this thesis ultimately argues that Kachyňa’s humanist poetics challenge a system that attempted to reduce the individual’s ability to express themselves freely. This thesis demonstrates how Kachyňa showed that it was possible to provide this challenge from within the staterun film industry without having works banned by the authorities. By examining his works throughout the communist regime in detail, a study of Kachyňa’s poetics reveals a filmmaker whose works continued to provide criticism of the regime and the filmmaking culture in an implicit manner and challenges the critical response to his works that currently exists. From this position, the thesis presented here argues that Kachyňa is an important filmmaker of the twentieth century whose works require greater attention in scholarship

    Sharing the Shore: Hybridity and Developing Environmentalisms in the Indiana Dunes

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    This thesis centers on the Indiana Dunes National Park, located in Northwestern Indiana, and the implications of this hybrid landscape on modern American environmentalism. Through secondary source research, historical analysis, and interviews with Miller Beach residents and a park ranger, this research concludes that the Indiana Dunes demonstrate an environmentalism that exists outside of the nature-culture binary. By incorporating the park into existing cities and industrial developments, the Indiana Dunes can be seen as a model for an environmental justice-driven space that diverges from the historic elitism of the National Park service. This research concludes that, while hybrid landscapes come with their own challenges, the hybridity of the Indiana Dunes ultimately points to a bright future for the National Park Service, one that makes public green space accessible and that radically rethinks what it means to be a National Park

    Beyond Protected Heritage Sites: A Geospatial Study of Malaprabha River Valley

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    The three heritage epi-centres of the Malaprabha River Valley, in Karnataka: Aihole, Badami and Pattadakal are developed as heritage precincts of Early Chalukyan heartland. Although the Valley is a lived landscape housing heritage structures from times before and after Early Chalukyan period. Though the heritage charters (national and international) and pedagogies advocate for integrated study of heritage by including their landscape and recognise the limitation of a monument centric approach, the existing processes remain monument centric.The primary objective of the doctoral research was to identify, document and geospatially analyse the Valley’s heritage built environments for addressing questions around built heritage and their landscape by not limiting to the protected monuments. This doctoral research used water harvesting features and hydrology to explore, study, and analyse the Valley’s heritage built environments. Towards this, a list of heritage built environments (both protected and unprotected) were compiled, geotagged, and geospatially analysed. This list - from multiple sources (such as colonial records, cartographic sources, and existing online government databases) - had to be freshly prepared due to non-availability of ready reliable geospatial data. The present study visualized and analysed the Valley’s built environment as an imbricated palimpsest, by foregrounding their physical landscape which enabled the appreciation of ecological and socio-cultural significance of the many unprotected structures. The study highlighted that the structures that qualify as heritage need not carry the typical physical fabric similar to the protected monuments. Rather, they can be architecturally insignificant, mundane-looking structures having continuity into the present times through collective memories and carry socio-cultural significance. The statistical analysis indicated the importance of recognising the potentials and strengths of the settlement’s physiographic parameters (as hydrology, hydro-geomorphology, geology, and soil). Recognising the relevance of the small structures and thoughtfully made subtle terrain modifications at Badami's environs highlighted the dependency of the protected monuments on such inconspicuous landscape features. The present work emphasizes that water features (both natural and man-made) proved to be the visible or sometimes invisible link that weaves together the Valley's protected and unprotected heritage built environments

    Translational Justice: Facing the Past to Take on the Present in Albania

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    The 1990s was a time of significant change for post-socialist nation-states in the former Eastern Bloc. Aspiring towards Western-style democracy, young republics like Albania focused on political, social, and economic reform. Transitional justice mechanisms, such as providing reparations to former state prisoners, became an important means of signaling change, both internally and externally. While Albania began enacting justice reforms in the early 1990s, such initiatives remain a concern three decades later. My research focuses on this issue, namely how international, state, and local actors in Albania imagine and enact transitional justice through projects that “deal with” the socialist past. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in 2017-2018 and an analysis of public media, I document and analyze the projects of two local nongovernmental organizations who focus on youth, democracy, and the past: Cultural Heritage without Borders (CHwB) Albania and the Institute for Democracy, Media, and Culture (IDMC). Further I track the livelihoods of Albanians born in the 1990s, who are often the targets of such past-facing initiatives given their lack of experience with the communist period and their perceived role in shaping Albania’s future. While ongoing calls to confront the past would suggest that Albania is stuck in what Mariella Pandolfi (2010) calls a “permanent transition,” the efforts of my interlocutors suggest otherwise. Drawing on their experiences, worldviews, and desires, staff at IDMC and CHwB Albania transformed international transitional justice mechanisms into interactive workshops where youth could consider democracy as not just one of Albania’s futures but its present. As part of this process, sites like Spaç Prison became infused with simultaneous potentials: a link to the past, a reflection on human rights in Europe, and/or an economic resource. Young adults further transformed such initiatives in light of their own needs to “go with the flow” or live in the present. Drawing on the work of anthropologists such as Marisol de la Cadena (2015), I argue that an anthropological approach to cultural translation is imperative for understanding how transitional justice works on the ground, what I call translational justice. Such a reframing can help us move past the notion of permanent transition.Doctor of Philosoph

    Play Among Books

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    How does coding change the way we think about architecture? Miro Roman and his AI Alice_ch3n81 develop a playful scenario in which they propose coding as the new literacy of information. They convey knowledge in the form of a project model that links the fields of architecture and information through two interwoven narrative strands in an “infinite flow” of real books

    Human Bondage in the Cultural Contact Zone

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    Slavery – the subjection of some human beings to a state of bondage by other, more powerful, people – has been an accepted social institution since ancient times. It is less well known that slavery has also produced cultural contact zones in forcing members of different cultures into sharing the same places – whether in private households, on plantations, in mines and quarries, or indeed the same imaginative sites in works of art and public memory. The recent commemorations of the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade by Britain (1807) and the United States (1808), as well as the rise of Black Atlantic Studies as a new academic field, have drawn new attention to this topic. In spite of these recent trends and the prominent position of slavery studies in British and American historiography, slavery’s implications for the study of cultural encounters remain a scholarly desideratum. This volume seeks to contribute to a better understanding of different forms of human bondage in cultural contact zones.The essays in this collection represent a wide spectrum of the scholarship on slavery, as well as illustrating the vast range of conceptual approaches to the topic. They bring together research from several different disciplines and critical angles addressing, for example, archaeological reconstructions of labor camps in an cient Palestine, the moral significance of early Christian slavery, the ambivalent aestheticization of black bodies within the colonial culture of taste, Enlightenment discourses about black revolution, the significance of mythical narratives in African-American slave culture, the musical mourning for lynching victims, and the blindness toward the presence of slave laborers in Nazi Germany.Most essays collected here are concerned with the cultural and human aspects of slavery as well as with establishing an understanding for the stark differences between various forms of slavery throughout history, stretching from antiquity into the twentieth century

    ECOS 2012

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    The 8-volume set contains the Proceedings of the 25th ECOS 2012 International Conference, Perugia, Italy, June 26th to June 29th, 2012. ECOS is an acronym for Efficiency, Cost, Optimization and Simulation (of energy conversion systems and processes), summarizing the topics covered in ECOS: Thermodynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer, Exergy and Second Law Analysis, Process Integration and Heat Exchanger Networks, Fluid Dynamics and Power Plant Components, Fuel Cells, Simulation of Energy Conversion Systems, Renewable Energies, Thermo-Economic Analysis and Optimisation, Combustion, Chemical Reactors, Carbon Capture and Sequestration, Building/Urban/Complex Energy Systems, Water Desalination and Use of Water Resources, Energy Systems- Environmental and Sustainability Issues, System Operation/ Control/Diagnosis and Prognosis, Industrial Ecology

    The Papers of Thomas A. Edison

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    The second volume of The Papers of Thomas A. Edison, which covers the inventor's life from the end of June 1873 to the end of March 1876, reveals a remarkable diversity of activities and interests. During his late twenties Thomas Edison pursued his pathbreaking work in telegraph technology, formed a business alliance with the notorious financier Jay Gould, and became embroiled in a bitter legal battle over commercial rights to his quadruplex telegraph. Praise for previous volumes of The Papers of Thomas A. Edison:"The essence of the volume is Edison's technical notebooks, a window onto the inventor's workshop. His lucidity comes through everywhere . . . His writing and drawing come together as a single, vigorous thought process."—Russell McCormmach, New York Times."A mine of material . . . Scrupulously edited . . . No one could ask for more . . . A choplicking feast for Edison biographers—well into the next century, and perhaps beyond."—Fred Howard, Washington Post."A triumph of the bookmaker's art, with splendidly arranged illustrations, essential background information, and cautionary reminders of the common sources on which Edison's imagination drew."—David Joravsky, New York Review of Books."In the pages of this volume Edison the man, his work, and his times come alive . . . A delight to browse through or to read carefully."—Thomas J. Misa, Science
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