26,038 research outputs found

    A Thought Experiment

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    Herewith, Justice Antonin Scalia\u27s long lost dissenting opinion in Brown v. Board of Education

    Some Legacies of Brown v. Board of Education

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    The litigation campaign against segregation that culminated in Brown v. Board of Education\u27 remains an important subject of study. Brown continues to be controversial because Americans remain uncertain about what its substantive commitments were, and, perhaps more important, how those commitments, as we now understand them, fit together with the other values and institutions that provide the structure of contemporary politics. This Essay will follow up on three aspects of the litigation campaign preceding Brown in an effort to show how Brown and its legacy illuminate enduring features of the organization of the U.S. political system

    Remembering Brown v. Board of Education

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    All Rise!

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    Topical issues met the dramatic arts in three innovative programs staged by the School of Law and local theaters. Real-life drama ensued in the racial tensions of Hairspray, death-penalty cases came to life in The Exonerated, and the arguments raged anew in Brown v. Board of Education

    Remembering Brown: A Tribute to John Hope Franklin

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    On March 27, 2008, the Duke Forum for Law & Social Change and the Office of the Dean co-sponsored a Symposium entitled, “Remembering Brown.” The panelists discussed both their experiences working to desegregate public schools and their perspectives on whether the aspiration of Brown v. Board of Education has been fulfilled

    Remembering Brown: A Tribute to John Hope Franklin

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    On March 27, 2008, the Duke Forum for Law & Social Change and the Office of the Dean co-sponsored a Symposium entitled, “Remembering Brown.” The panelists discussed both their experiences working to desegregate public schools and their perspectives on whether the aspiration of Brown v. Board of Education has been fulfilled

    An Examination of Disingenuous Deeds by St. Louis Public Schools 1945-1983

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    The Saint Louis Public Schools (SLPS) St. Louis, Missouri, operated a de facto segregated school system for three decades after the United States Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education. National and local media outlets celebrated St. Louis Public Schools for their desegregation plan in response to the 1954 United States Supreme Court Brown v. Board of Education decision. However, the counter narrative to media celebration is that the St. Louis Public Schools system practiced de facto segregation. In reality the St. Louis school district officials protected school segregation for half a century. In this research, I will expose duplicitous deeds implemented by the St. Louis Public Schools to protect a segregated school system prior to 1954 United States Supreme Court Brown v. Board of Education and sustained a segregated school system several decades after the decision. In 1980, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit in Missouri ruled through the Liddell v. Board of Education for the City of St. Louis that the St. Louis school district established and maintained a racially segregated school system in violation of students’ constitutional rights. This ruling mandated a metropolitan desegregation plan by the St. Louis Public Schools and surrounding districts twenty-six years after the United States Supreme Court Brown v. Board of Education decision

    Voices of Moderation: Southern Whites Respond to Brown v. Board of Education

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    At the shining apex of racial reform in the civil rights era stands the historic 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. Recently passing its fiftieth anniversary, the ruling struck down legal school segregation which had been upheld by the same court some fifty-eight years earlier in the Plessy v. Ferguson ruling. Brown is highly revered today as a sacred document and cornerstone of American race-relations, but the ruling initially garnered widespread shock, outrage, and defiance in the bedrock of segregation, the deep South. At least that is what we have been told. A closer analysis of southern public opinion regarding Brown reveals a multitude of views ranging from pure racist condemnation to praised acceptance and affirmation of racial equality. There were indeed voices of moderation in the South. In the summer of 1954, reaction and response to Brown v. Board of Education in the deep South was not unanimous; there were clear voices of racial moderation that called for a calm rational response, compliance and respect for the ruling, and eager acceptance of integrated education

    Korematsu and Beyond: Japanese Americans and the Origins of Strict Scrutiny

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    The authors examine the role that the Japanese American Citizens League played in the development of the strict scrutiny doctrine partly responsible for the ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. The plight of Japanese Americans during their WWII internment gave them experience in implementing this doctrine, which they passed on to the NAACP

    Originalism and Brown v. Board of Education

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    Article published in the Michigan State Law Review
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