29,514 research outputs found

    BLS Spotlight on Statistics: Industry on Tap: Breweries

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    Breweries, breweries everywhere, and so much beer to drink! It seems as though nearly every town in America has a brewery these days, suggesting that the industry must be expanding rapidly. But, is it? From 2006 to 2016, breweries accounted for more than half of the employment growth within the beverage manufacturing industry. As breweries—establishments engaged primarily in brewing beer, ale, lager, malt liquors, and nonalcoholic beer—are beginning to take up a larger share of the beverage manufacturing industry, soft drink and ice manufacturing\u27s share has been declining. This Spotlight on Statistics examines historical employment trends for breweries and the other component industries that make up the beverage manufacturing industry. It also looks at wages, the number of establishments, prices, and injury rates for the brewing industry and compares them with similar measures for distilleries, wineries, and the soft drink and ice manufacturing industry

    Why bean beer?

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    Beer can be a wholesome beverage, and the art of brewing beer has been intertwined with the development of civilised society for centuries. Today, the latest valuation of the economic value of beer (by accountants Ernst and Young in 2013), reported that Europe is the world’s biggest producer of beer with over 4,500 breweries delivering around 390 million hectolitres annually – which in plain English is 68,632,200,000 pints (since 1 hectolitre is a small spillage less than 176 imperial pints). The industry employs over 2 million people, and around 125,000 of these are employed in breweries themselves. It should also be no surprise then that sales generated 53 billion Euro, which is almost doubled again by the value added from the supply chain. Also, the EU brewing sector had a trade surplus (i.e. exports were greater than imports) to the value of 3 billion Euro in 2012. Beer is serious business

    Can Niche Agriculturalists Take Notes from the Craft Beer Industry?

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    This industry-level case study focuses on the growth cycles of craft brewing, a niche industry. The research case is defined as the craft beer industry evolution including the surrounding institutional and consumer environments. The research goal is to provide insight for niche agriculturalists by examining the case of the successful niche craft beer industry. First, the environment surrounding craft beer reemergence is analyzed. We examine the current state of the craft beer industry with a focus on competitive and logistical forces. We then highlight critical success factors of the craft beer industry and suggests how these factors can be applied to niche agriculture. Conclusions regarding the craft beer industry are drawn from both published documents and craft beer industry discussions. The primary craft beer industry “success†factors deemed transferable to niche agriculture include: 1) indentifying a consumer-driven niche opportunity; 2) engaging in marketing strategies leveraging consumer “hobby consumption†within the niche; 3) leveraging established industry logistics; and 4) participating in unified advocacy regarding both marketing and regulatory lobbies.Agribusiness, Marketing,

    The Use of Rice in Brewing

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    Rice could be a useful raw material for the production of a gluten-free beer-like beverage. In today’s beer brewing industry, rice is primarily used as an adjunct in combination with barley malt. But, recently, there is some information about rice malt for brewing an all-rice malt beer. The use of rice as an adjunct in brewing is described highlighting the quality attributes of the final beer. The rice grain quality attributes of different samples are reported in order to evaluate their attitude to malting and brewing and also considering their enzymatic activity. Then, the different brewing processes to produce all-rice malt beers will be described and the final gluten-free rice beers is evaluated and compared to a barley malt beer. Finally, the levels of major aroma-active components of an all-rice malt beer and the results of the sensory analysis assessing the beer-like character of the rice beverage are reported. The obtained beer samples show a content of volatile compounds comparable with a barley malt beer. The sensory profile of the rice malt beer is similar to a barley malt beer in aroma, taste and mouthfeel

    Reclaiming Their Rightful Place?: an Analysis of the Links Between Medieval and Early Modern Female Brewers and Consumers in Ireland With Their Modern Counterparts

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    Over the course of the past several decades the world of beer and brewing has undergone a major shift. What was once an industry and culture dominated by men has seen a considerable influx of both female brewers and consumers. This has often been heralded in the media as a return to the historical status quo, because, they contend, women had generally been the dominant force in brewing for centuries all over the world. These articles explore this brewing history for links to the modern craft beer scene and often conclude that women are once again achieving their rightful position within the industry, one that they haven’t held for many years. Tara Nurin’s aptly named “How Women Brewster’s Saved the World” declared that, “until fairly recently as history goes, women were the driving force behind much of the world’s beer production” (Nurin 2016). Furthermore, in her “Brewing Beer has Always Been a Women’s Game”, author Maya Oppenheim (2017) exclaimed: “women are now reclaiming an industry that was pretty much birthed by them”

    Faba bean as a novel brewing adjunct:consumer evaluation

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    The starch in the grains of legumes, such as faba bean (Vicia faba L.), offers an environmentally sustainable raw material for the brewing industry as their entire nitrogen fertiliser requirement can be provided by the natural process of biological nitrogen fixation. Faba bean is, therefore, distinguished from species such as spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), which require large amounts of synthetic nitrogen fertiliser. Consumer analysis of beer produced with faba bean as an adjunct compared with barley malt beers has not previously been assessed. This study evaluated the potential of beers brewed using 30% (w/w) dehulled bean (kernel) flour as an adjunct to malted barley, using a series of quantitative sensory tests. The first, a blind acceptance test with inferred preference, found no statistically significant difference in the taste score of the bean kernel flour adjunct beer when compared with conventional beer. In the second acceptance test, the knowledge that the beer was produced using beans did not affect the overall consumer impression of the beer, regardless of how this information was presented. These results suggest that the use of faba beans in brewing does not impact negatively on the taste or acceptability of the resultant bee

    Cheers Indiana : brewing in the crossroads of America

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    This project examines the history and evolution of the beer brewing industry in Indiana through a half hour long documentary, titled Indiana in a Pint. Indiana has a rich and vibrant history of brewing beer, dating back to the initial recognition of statehood in 1816. Indiana reached one hundred breweries pre-prohibition, but the 1980’s, the number was down to two. Now, however, Indiana is well on its way to having one hundred breweries once again. The documentary details the history of brewing in Indiana as well as highlighting the current craft brewing community.Department of TelecommunicationsThesis (M.A.

    Through the Bottom of a Drinking Glass: How Beer and Brewing Changed Human HIstory

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    Abstract Every corner of the earth is either currently influenced by or has been influenced by the beer and brewing industry. The significance of this product throughout human history is extensive and one would think the study of it would reflect this. However, until recently the study of beer and brewing was mostly historical and archeological in nature. The social, personal lives and economic impact of those who either consume or produce beer were largely overlooked. This look into how beer and brewing changed cultures and the life of everyone from the king to the peasant is of great importance in understanding the evolution of its role as a driver in the growth of human society. It is the primary contention of this paper that the relegation of beer to a common man’s drink has been purposely exaggerated by certain groups and the impact of the social bias of some on this industry can be seen best through the resulting temperance and prohibition movements in America. This was the result of the clear misunderstanding of how essential beer and brewing are to the human populace if not to its current survival as a clear marker of how human societies came to be what they are today. However, to understand this one would need to both possess a time machine and travel to each period. Since this is clearly not a viable option currently this paper will attempt through the collaboration of historical evidence combined with first person experience to paint a picture of the role that brewing and consuming beer played in the life of these people

    The internationalization of the beer brewing industry

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    Economies of scale ; International trade ; Beer industry

    Brewing Green Beer: Building a Regulatory Scheme Robust to Changes in Brewing Technologies

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    New beer brewing technologies provide brewers with options to produce beer in more eco-friendly, less resource-intensive ways; however, as brewers adopt these technologies, they may find themselves straddling between the regulatory schemes of the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (“TTB”) and the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”). The two agencies have divided control over beers based on their ingredients, which places some beers under the TTB’s purview as “malted beverages” and others under the FDA’s purview. These distinctions have implications for the regulatory hurdles that brewers must overcome to market their products. Additional regulations that eco-friendly, green beers may face could provide higher hurdles than standard beers face, putting them at a competitive disadvantage. This Comment explores the relationships between beer brewing and the environment, new technologies that ease the environmental burden of beer brewing, and the regulatory boundaries affected by adopting these new technologies. By expanding its definition of “malted beverages,” the TTB can encourage the adoption of new eco-friendly technologies, avoid a regulatory quandary, and promote a healthy beer brewing industry
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