94,884 research outputs found

    Dentistry

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    The specialty of Dental Surgery has progressed from the "blood and acrylic" of the early seventies. Dentistry has undergone a quantum leap over the past twenty-five years, with improvements in both technique and technology, bringing us the sophisticated procedures used in today's practice.peer-reviewe

    NO FRACTIONS HERE: NAVIGATING BLOOD QUANTUM-BASED COLORISM SETTLER IDEOLOGY WITHIN TRIBAL COMMUNITIES

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    In this paper, I study the practices of Tribal blood quantum within tribal communities from an Indigenous perspective, focusing on an internal community concern regarding blood quantum and its impact on Native people, tribal communities, and the next seven generations. Looking from the lens of how Indigenous peoples view tribal membership enrollment and Native American blood quantum from the perspective of Indigenous people. Using a mixed method approach with a survey and interviews, I identified a trend of emotions that affects tribal citizens\u27 cultural identity, kinship, and sense of belonging, coining the term Blood Quantum-Based Colorism (BQBC). Acknowledging, understanding, and criticizing blood quantum settler ideology will be vital to our future generations and tribal sustainability. Throughout my paper, I use the terms: Native, Indigenous, and tribal interchangeably and intentionally

    Blood Quantum and Equal Protection

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    Modern equal protection doctrine treats laws that make distinctions on the basis of indigeneity defined on blood quantum terms along a racial/political paradigm. This dichotomy may be traced to Morton v. Mancari and more recently to Rice v. Cayetano. In Mancari, the Supreme Court held that laws that privilege members of Native American tribes do not constitute racial discrimination because the preferences have a political purpose – to further the right to self-government of tribes. Rice v. Cayetano crystallized the juxtaposition of the racial from the political nature of indigeneity by invalidating a law that privileged Native Hawaiians. That law, according to the Court, used an ancestral blood requirement to construct a racial category and a racial purpose. Close analysis of the legal construction of the dichotomy between the constitutive notion of indigeneity as either a racial and political identity has largely escaped scholarship. Scholars have examined and critiqued equal protection law’s racialized construction of blood quantum laws and to a lesser extent, their political construction. A more robust examination of the equal protection doctrinal approach itself in categorizing one as race and the other as political, however, has been lacking. This Essay aims to fill this void in scholarship by interrogating and critiquing the dichotomy of the racial versus political meaning of indigeneity based on blood quantum. In so doing, I make two interrelated points. First, I argue that the dichotomy obscures the structural inequalities in the current regulatory process that limits the conferral of federal tribal recognition to a select group of indigenous groups. An indigenous group’s acquisition of federal recognition is critical because, as Mancari shows, equal protection law equates such recognition with political status, which immunizes the group from strict scrutiny. Second, I examine cases in the U.S. territories that have been overlooked in equal protection cases involving blood quantum laws. These cases upheld property ownership restrictions that utilize blood quantum distinctions because they functioned to protect the property and cultures of the indigenous peoples in those territories. Continued marginalization of these territorial cases, I argue, would be a mistake. At minimum, these territorial cases help to advance a broader theory of indigeneity’s political meaning. This more expansive view of the political theory of indigeneity recognizes the relationships among culture, property and autonomy. More broadly, by interjecting these cases in the modern interpretation of blood quantum as a marker for either a racial or political identity, they demonstrate that equal protection law’s current approach sets up a false dichotomy. The implication of law’s recognition of cultural differences in the territories to “mainstream” equal protection law is significant given the doctrine’s resistance to cultural claims. Consequently, these cases facilitate retheorizing the way law views race, political identity, culture and property

    The Native Plays of Lynn Riggs (Cherokee) and the Question of “Race”-specific Casting

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    Medical diagnostics using designed molecules with sense and logic

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    Luminescent molecules responsive to cations, anions and even small molecules can be designed with the appropriate selectivity and sensitivity for monitoring physiological and pathological levels of analytes. We highlight some recent examples of designed molecules that can sense for a specific analyte or a combination of analytes in blood and in living cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate how molecules can be designed with built-in algorithms according to principles of Boolean logic to perform information processing. The potential future application of molecular systems able to perform multi-analyte sensing as `lab-on-a-molecule' systems for medical and environmental diagnostics is also presented.peer-reviewe

    Materials science: Breaking the neural code

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    The precise information that is conveyed between nerve cells remains unknown. Networks of nerve cells grown on silicon chips, using a polyester as a guide, may bring us closer to translating the elusive neural language
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