58 research outputs found

    A novel locus for restless legs syndrome maps to chromosome 19p in an Irish pedigree

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    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common, sleep-related movement disorder. The symptoms follow a circadian pattern, worsening in the evening or night, leading to sleep disruption and daytime somnolence. Familial forms of RLS have been described and usually display an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. To date, linkage analysis has identified nine RLS loci, but no specific causative gene has been reported. Association mapping has highlighted a further four genomic areas of interest. We have conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis in an Irish autosomal dominant RLS pedigree with 11 affected members. Significant linkage was found on chromosome 19p for a series of microsatellite markers, with a maximum two-point LOD score of 3.59 at θ = 0.0 for marker D19S878. Recombination events, identified by haplotype analysis, define a genetic region of 6.57 cM on chromosome 19p13.3, corresponding to an interval of 2.5 Mb. This study provides evidence of a novel RLS locus and provides further evidence that RLS is a genetically heterogenous disorder

    Restless legs syndrome: differential diagnosis and management with rotigotine

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    RLS is a common sleep disorder with distinctive clinical features. The prevalence of RLS in Caucasians and North Americans ranges from 5% to 10%. However, only some of these subjects (almost the 3% of the general population) report being affected by a frequent and severe form of the sleep disorder. RLS is diagnosed clinically by means of four internationally recognized criteria that summarize the main characteristics of the sleep disorder. Besides the essential criteria, supportive and associated features of RLS have been established by experts in order to help physicians treat patients with doubtful symptoms. Several clinical conditions may mimic this sleep disorder. In order to increase the sensibility and specificity of RLS diagnosis, doctors should perform a meticulous patient history and then an accurate physical and neurological examination. Dopamine agonists are recognized as the preferred first-line treatment for RLS. Rotigotine is a non-ergoline dopamine agonist with selectivity for D1, D2 and D3 receptors. The drug is administered via transdermal patches which release rotigotine for 24 hours. Four clinical trials demonstrated that this compound is able to improve RLS symptomatology with few and moderate adverse events. Head to head trials are required to compare the efficacy and tolerability of rotigotine with other dopamine agonists administered via oral intake. Rotigotine has been approved by the FDA and EMEA for Parkinson’s disease. For the treatment of moderate to severe idiopathic RLS, rotigotine has been recommended for approval by the EMEA and is under review by the FDA

    Migraine and restless legs syndrome: is there an association?

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    Occasional clinical reports have suggested a link between migraine and restless legs syndrome. We undertook a systematic review of the evidence, which supports this association, and consider possible shared pathogenic mechanisms and the implications for current clinical practice

    Ropinirole in restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder

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    Restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder of sleep are now recognized as prevalent, distinct, yet overlapping disorders affecting all age groups. Although delineation of the mechanisms underlying these disorders continues to be the focus of very intense research efforts, it has become apparent that there is a prominent role for dopaminergic agents in the clinical management of these patients. Among the various dopaminergic drugs, ropinirole has undergone relatively intense and critical scrutiny, and appears to provide a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with these two conditions. The more recent development of a controlled formulation for this drug is likely to yield additional benefits such as improved adherence and reduced fluctuations in daytime and nighttime symptoms. However, there is not enough evidence at this time to support such assumption

    Restless legs syndrome: differential diagnosis and management with rotigotine

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    Étude sur le rôle des déséquilibres génomiques dans le Syndrome d’Impatiences Musculaires de l’Éveil

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    Le Syndrome d’Impatiences Musculaires de l’Éveil (SIME) est une maladie neurologique caractérisée par un besoin urgent de bouger les jambes. C’est également l’une des causes les plus fréquentes d’insomnie. C’est une maladie très répandue, avec une prévalence de presque 15 % dans la population générale. Les maladies multifactorielles comme le SIME sont souvent le résultat de l’évolution d’une composante génétique et d’une composante environnementale. Dans le cadre du SIME, les études d’association génomique ont permis l’identification de 4 variants à effet modéré ou faible. Cependant, ces quatre variants n’expliquent qu’une faible partie de la composante génétique de la maladie, ce qui confirme que plusieurs nouveaux variants sont encore à identifier. Le rôle des déséquilibres génomiques (Copy Number Variations ou CNVs) dans le mécanisme génétique du SIME est à ce jour inconnu. Cependant, les CNVs se sont récemment positionnés comme une source d’intérêt majeur de variation génétique potentiellement responsable des phénotypes. En collaboration avec une équipe de Munich, nous avons réalisé deux études CNVs à échelle génomique (biopuces à SNP et hybridation génomique comparée (CGH)) sur des patients SIME d’ascendance germanique. À l’aide d’une étude cas-contrôle, nous avons pu identifier des régions avec une occurrence de CNVs différentes pour les patients SIME, comparés à différents groupes contrôles. L’une de ces régions est particulièrement intéressante, car elle est concordante à la fois avec des précédentes études familiales ainsi qu’avec les récentes études d’associations génomiques.Restless Legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder characterized by the urge to move one’s limbs. It is also one of the most frequent causes of insomnia. The prevalence of RLS is estimated to be around 15% in the general population. Complexes disorders like RLS are often the result of the evolution of genetic and environmental components. For RLS, recent Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) have identified four variants with mild to moderate effects. However, those four variants explain only a small part of the disease heritability and thus, we expect that many new variants are still to be found. The impact of Copy-Number Variation (CNV) in the genetic mechanism of RLS is still unknown. However, many studies have recently position the CNVs as a significant source of genetic variation potentially responsible of phenotypes. In collaboration with a team from Munich, we conducted two genome-wide CNVs studies (Genome Wide SNP chips and Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH)) on RLS patients from Germany. Using cases-controls studies, we identified regions with a different occurrence of CNVs for RLS patients, compared to different groups of controls. One of these regions is particularly interesting, as it has already been identified by both linkage and association studies
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