92,557 research outputs found

    the iconography of Lumumba in the arts and the work of Raoul Peck

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    A two-days bilingual international conference (February 18-19, 2016), organized by the University of Antwerp,1 with keynote speaker Raoul Peck and Johannes Fabian. Organisation: Matthias De Groof and Kathleen Gyssels, Antwerp University

    Air Support in the Breskens Pocket: The Case of the First Canadian Army and the 84 Group Royal Air Force

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    Operation “Switchback” was conceived to capture the Breskens pcoket and liberate the south bank of the Scheldt Estuary leading to Antwerp. As the Allies moved out of Normandy in the late summer of 1944, their primary supply line remained over the invasion beaches. The logistical situation became critical as the distance fromthe beachhead lengthened. The British scored a major coup in early September when they captured the port of Antwerp. Not only was this the largest port in Europe, it had been taken with its port facilities intact. Unfortunately, there remained one problem; Antwerp lay some 50 miles from the Sea. The only approach to the port lay along the Scheldt Estuary. The Germans controlled both banks of this channel and were determined to hold out to the last. Until the land on either side could be liberated, the port of Antwerp was useless to the Allies

    Eugene Colson and the Liberation of the Port of Antwerp

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    In September 1944 a unique alliance of Canadian infantrymen with Belgian resistance fighters joined forces to liberate the port of Antwerp. It was the key, as many see it, to victory. In September 1994, the Governor General of Canada honoured this collaboration and the one man responsible for the Belgian participation in it, Colonel Eugene Colson of Antwerp, with the Meritorious Service Medal. Rarely have such medals been given to non-Canadians

    Sculptors modelling Antwerp silver

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    This paper focus on the collaboration between Antwerp sculptors and silversmiths in the 17th century

    Letter from Professor Leo Achten to Geraldine Ferraro

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    Letter from Leo Achten, professor of modern history, Saint Stanislas, Antwerp, to Geraldine Ferraro. Achten requests specific autograph from Ferraro.https://ir.lawnet.fordham.edu/vice_presidential_campaign_correspondence_1984_international/1022/thumbnail.jp

    Unbounded urbanization and the Horizontal Metropolis : the pragmatic program of August Mennes in the Antwerp agglomeration

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    Parallel to many discussions in other European cities, the debate on a metropolitan Antwerp emerged at the turn of the 20th century, following the decision to tear down the old ramparts around the city in 1904. Once boundless, the old core became for the first time the subject of a contiguous urban expansion at its very fringes. Soon, however, far more loose urbanization processes would wash over the land as the urban territories rapidly expanded beyond what was at first imagined. By consequence, the face of the future Antwerp metropolis would be shaped by a series of interlocking and unbounded urbanization processes. Tracing the interrelated endeavors of the key parties that helped shaping these urbanization processes, ranging from property tycoons, technocrats and architects to key figures in the political world, my PhD research aims at rendering the contours of a long history of the construction of Antwerp’s twentieth century belt within which the notions of urbanism and urbanization are blurred. Through an eclectic catalogue of five ‘urban questions’, this paper investigates the various ways in which the process of territorial rescaling set in motion in 1904 coproduced the features of today’s horizontal metropolis. Based on the activities of engineer August Mennes, the paper will try to conclude that the Antwerp Horizontal Metropolis surfaced as the result of a juxtaposition of urbanization techniques that question and transcend the interpretation of ‘urbanization’ as a process of random and speculative accumulation

    A cloistered entrepĂŽt: sir Tobie Matthew and the English Carmel in Antwerp

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    To escape religious persecution in England, English Carmelite nuns took refuge in Antwerp, where in 1619 Anne of the Ascension (Anne Worsley, 1588-1644) and Lady Mary Lovell (c. 1564-1628) had founded a convent expressly for exiled young English ladies. Although insulated from the world by enclosure and obedience to the rule, the Antwerp Carmel was not cut off from its surroundings. A careful perusal of the foundation's "Chronicle'' and the vast correspondence left by the women religious exposes an interesting jigsaw of intersections between the private and the public, and the religious and cultural worlds of the early modern period. The Carmelite community indeed patronized artists outside the convent walls, commissioning for instance an English translation of the Life of St Teresa from Sir Tobie Matthew (1577-1655), who also produced a hitherto unknown Life of one of the Carmelite nuns

    “Where are our Liberators?”: The Canadian Liberation of West Brabant, 1944

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    Canadian historians of the Second World War have long been interested in a strategic debate that has waged since 1944: should the Allies have exploited the success of the capture of Antwerp, then the largest port in Northwest Europe, by clearing its western approaches; or should they have sought to “leap” the German defenses along the Rhine, in the ill-fated Operation “Market Garden.” All Canadian writers on the issue are agreed that the decision to go ahead with “Market Garden” held important consequences for the soldiers of First Canadian Army. As British and American forces turned northeast of Antwerp in the first weeks of September, the Canadians, already committed to opening the Channel ports, were given the additional task of clearing the approaches to the city—the shores of the Scheldt estuary. The intense fighting in the areas surrounding Antwerp through September and October 1944 reflected the importance the Germans gave to denying the Allies use of the port. Victory in the Battle of the Scheldt, fought from 1 October to 8 November 1944, came at a cost of 6,367 Canadians killed, wounded, or missing. Many of those killed through this time rest at the Commonwealth War Graves cemetery just east of the city of Bergen-op-Zoom in West Brabant. Any Canadian visitor to the site must be struck by the care still given to each white grave. For fifty years, local citizens of the ancient walled city have tended the graves with extraordinary care. They have not forgotten their Canadian liberators, for their fates were bound together by the same strategic decisions. Indeed, for the people of Bergen-op-Zoom and the surrounding countryside, the months of September and October 1944 were marked by elation, despair, tragedy, courage-and finally triumph through liberation. The liberation seemed long in coming, for despite being only some 25 kilometres north of Antwerp, which fell on 4 September, the city’s Canadian liberators did not occupy its centrum until 27 October 1944. What follows is the story of the liberation of West Brabant from both a Canadian and Dutch perspective. It seeks ultimately to examine how the circumstances of war so strongly bound the Dutch citizens of West Brabant to their Canadian liberators

    Ortelius\u27s Map of the World and Homann\u27s Ship Model Map

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    Abraham Ortelius and Johann Baptist Homann were very successful cartographers who benefitted from the rising trend in curiosity cabinets during the Renaissance. Ortelius lived from 1527-1598 and was born in Antwerp, Belgium, and Homann became famous in Nuremberg, Germany during his life from 1663-1724. [excerpt

    Ortelius\u27s Map of the World and Homann\u27s Ship Model Map

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    Abraham Ortelius and Johann Baptist Homann were very successful cartographers who benefitted from the rising trend in curiosity cabinets during the Renaissance. Ortelius lived from 1527-1598 and was born in Antwerp, Belgium, and Homann became famous in Nuremberg, Germany during his life from 1663-1724. [excerpt
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