480 research outputs found

    The costume design of Boeing Boeing

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    Oral History Project World War II Years, 1941-1946 - Art Pejsa

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    Arthur Pejsa was born 8 March 1923 in Custer, Wisconsin, where he spent his childhood. After graduating from high school in 1940 in nearby Stevens Point, Art attended Central State Teachers College (CSTC, now UW-Stevens Point) for 1940-41, then moved to Milwaukee and Wausau and worked during 1941-42 as a machinist. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in summer 1942 and in January 1943, after another semester at CSTC, entered active service. After Basic Training at Sheppard Field, near Wichita Falls, Texas, Art took advanced training over the next twelve months and qualified as a bomber pilot. In June 1944 he was selected for duty in the new B-29 Superfortress bomber, and after several months schooling at Clovis, New Mexico, was posted in November 1944 to the 20th Air Force base at Karaghpur, India. Art remained here for six months, and as lead pilot flew missions to Singapore, Saigon, Bangkok, Japan, and other targets. In May 1945 Art was transferred with his crew to an air base on Tinian, in the Mariana Islands, and from here flew more than fifteen missions over Japan. For a mission over Himeji, Japan, on 22 June 1945, Art was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. In all, he completed twenty-six combat missions before rotating back to the US in October 1945. Art was discharged in January 1946 with the rank of 1st lieutenant. After military service, Art quickly completed undergraduate (CSTC, 1947) and graduate (Marquette, 1948) degrees, then joined the faculty of the US Naval Academy, where he taught from 1948-56. He then worked more than twenty-five years as an aerospace mathematical physicist for the AC Division of General Motors and for Honeywell, in Minneapolis, retiring in 1985. He remained active in the field after retirement, and authored several books on ballistics

    Oral History Project World War II Years, 1941-1946 - Art Pejsa

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    Arthur Pejsa was born 8 March 1923 in Custer, Wisconsin, where he spent his childhood. After graduating from high school in 1940 in nearby Stevens Point, Art attended Central State Teachers College (CSTC, now UW-Stevens Point) for 1940-41, then moved to Milwaukee and Wausau and worked during 1941-42 as a machinist. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in summer 1942 and in January 1943, after another semester at CSTC, entered active service. After Basic Training at Sheppard Field, near Wichita Falls, Texas, Art took advanced training over the next twelve months and qualified as a bomber pilot. In June 1944 he was selected for duty in the new B-29 Superfortress bomber, and after several months schooling at Clovis, New Mexico, was posted in November 1944 to the 20th Air Force base at Karaghpur, India. Art remained here for six months, and as lead pilot flew missions to Singapore, Saigon, Bangkok, Japan, and other targets. In May 1945 Art was transferred with his crew to an air base on Tinian, in the Mariana Islands, and from here flew more than fifteen missions over Japan. For a mission over Himeji, Japan, on 22 June 1945, Art was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. In all, he completed twenty-six combat missions before rotating back to the US in October 1945. Art was discharged in January 1946 with the rank of 1st lieutenant. After military service, Art quickly completed undergraduate (CSTC, 1947) and graduate (Marquette, 1948) degrees, then joined the faculty of the US Naval Academy, where he taught from 1948-56. He then worked more than twenty-five years as an aerospace mathematical physicist for the AC Division of General Motors and for Honeywell, in Minneapolis, retiring in 1985. He remained active in the field after retirement, and authored several books on ballistics

    Walker Talker: Saturday, July 15, 1944

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    The Saturday, July 15, 1944 edition of the Walker Talker.https://scholars.fhsu.edu/walker_talker/1067/thumbnail.jp

    Oceanus.

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    v. 44, no. 2 (2005

    164th Infantry News: July 2019

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    July 2019 edition of the 164th Infantry News. A total of 104 pages, containing news articles, event notices, photographs, and personal memories from the veterans of the 164th Infantry Regiment.https://commons.und.edu/infantry-documents/1057/thumbnail.jp

    The Princeton Leader, November 7, 1940

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    The Tri-State Defender, November 07, 1964

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    Smokejumper Magazine, July 2006

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    This issue of the National Smokejumper Association (NSA) Smokejumper Magazine contains the following articles: Russian Smokejumpers—The Pre-War Years, The Death of PFC Malvin Brown, Orv Looper—Bigger Than Life Foreman, Jim Larkin—A Long and Memorable Career (Historic). Smokejumper Magazine continues Static Line, which was the original title of the NSA quarterly magazine.https://dc.ewu.edu/smokejumper_mag/1051/thumbnail.jp

    The Blackjack, 1944-1945: a story about and published by the 21st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion

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    From the Foreword For three years these men have adjusted their individual characters, their own ways of doing things, their very natures to that vague method of procedure called The Navy Way. It is at once the most efficient and most bungling method of getting things done. It is a conglomerate of logical procedure mixed with hopeless muddling, sound economy with profligate waste, rank incompetency with expert performance, nonsensical methods of operation with excellent results. Men exposed to the Navy Way for three years have drunk the dregs of despair and tasted the wine of life at its fullest. They have seen life at its worst and at its best. Men so exposed will never be the same. Such are the men of the Twenty-First. This is our story. This is the story of the 21st U. S. Naval Construction Battalion, the 21st Seabees, the Blackjacks -- one of those groups of a thousand-odd men who helped to build and fight the way to the defeat of Japan. We were just one battalion, and thousands of battalions and millions of men and women made up our armed forces. Maybe our part was small in the whole history of the war, but we saw to it that this part was done with a let\u27s-get-it-over-with-quickly, Can Do energy. These words and pictures are mostly about our second tour of overseas duty -- our work in the Central and Western Pacific. Before this came our first cruise in the Aleutians.https://digicom.bpl.lib.me.us/ww_reg_his/1170/thumbnail.jp
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