459,903 research outputs found

    [Review of] Teodros Kiros, ed. Explorations in African Political Thought: Identity, Community, Ethics

    Get PDF
    Explorations in African Political Thought: Identity, Community, Ethics is a collection of ten essays written both by newcomers and by well-known African philosophers. Most of the authors are currently teaching in American universities. It is part of the growing literature that cements African philosophy as an integral part of the discipline of philosophy while charting new venues for the field. The objective of this book is to illustrate that African philosophy can serve African people as a moralactivity guided by the principles of practical reason in addressing the underlying problems of African economic, political, and social institutions. Teodros Kiros, the volume\u27s editor, chose the contributors because they were willing to describe phenomenologically entrenched practices of today\u27s Africa, subject them to critical assessment, and, when necessary, displace them with better visions and research. Kiros writes in the introduction that the authors address perennial cultural, political, and ethical problems that plague the human condition in Africa

    Concept, Principles and Research Methods of African Environmental Ethics

    Get PDF
    [English] This paper aims to discuss ten traditional and contemporary methodological paradigms in African philosophy, and demonstrates how they may apply to African environmental ethics research. The methods include: Ethno-philosophy, Sage Philosophy, Conversational Philosophy, Conceptual Mandelanization, Eco-Afrocentricism, Indigenous Language Analysis, Eco-Afro-feminism, Conceptual Decolonization, Storytelling Philosophy, and Cultural Adaptationism. The significance and limitations of the methodologies are highlighted. The concept and principles of African environmental ethics are analyzed and discussed to facilitate an understanding of the conceptual frameworks that underpin the methodologies. In conclusion, the discourse demonstrates that environmental ethics research in Africa should be based on African philosophical methodologies so as to facilitate production of research that will be relevant in African contexts. [Annang] N̄wed nduongo ami ayem ibene nwọ́d mme n̄kaan nne mfa usung unam nduongo ke vilọsọvi Afrịke , nne nte amọ ekeme iwam unam nduongo mbanga ido ukpeme nkan-nkuk ke Afrịke. Mme usung unam nduongo ami nsehe ade ami: vilọsọvi mben ufọk, vilọsọvi n̄kan ideen, vilọsọvi nneme, vilọsọvi Mandela, “Eco-Afrocentricism”, nduongore usem utiit ajid, vilọsọvi ibaan Afrịke, vilọsọvi mkpọk-nyak, vilọsọvi n̄ke, nne ukpep ido idung agwo. N̄wed ami abene awọd mme ikek nne nde mem idem usung nduongo ami. N̄wed ami atang mkpọ abanga se ido ukpeme nkan-nkuk ke Afrịke anwongo nne mme itai amọ, nne nte amọ ewam mbon nduongo ediọhọ nnanga ekpekakpa ibọrọ nduongo amọ. Ke n̄suuk ikọ, ukpep ami mkpọ abene awọd ate ke ekpena ekama usung nduongo vilọsọvi Afrịke enam nduongo ebanga ido ukpeme nkan-nkuk ke Afrịke man ibọrọ nduongo asanga akekem nne se adiiwam Afrịke

    The Contribution of African Philosophy in Challenging Western Hegemony and Globalization

    Get PDF
    Abstract The purpose of this article is to explore the contribution of African philosophy in challenging the impacts of Western hegemony and globalization on Africa. Since Western philosophy claims the “universality” of its philosophy, culture, science and technology, some racist Western philosophers pledge to provide this to Africa as part of their “civilizing mission” because they argue that Africa has no civilization. Nowadays, this notion, supported by globalization, assumes a hegemonic place in Africa. The article examines the impacts of globalization which has increased the cultural, political and economic problems of the continent which require the contribution of African philosophy to be resolved. In so doing,a qualitative method is used by analyzing relevant secondary sources collected from books, book sections, and journal articles. The article argued that African philosophy as such uses critical analysis, synthesis, and criticism to resolve problems facing the people of the continent. So, the African philosophical approach should be used to sort out and do away with African problems. Mostimportantly,recognizing and inculcating the contributions of African traditional values and thoughts that can go hand in hand with the achievements of globalization is vital, for Western science and technology alone are so local, and not enough for the betterment of Africa. Based on this, the article suggested that both the West and Africa should take part in cross-cultural communications so as to create understanding about the pluralistic nature of cultures and the significance of African traditional values and thoughts. This, in turn, empowers African philosophers, the people,governments, and concerned bodies to work on Africanization via rediscovering African identity

    African Indigenous Languages and the Advancement of African Philosophy

    Get PDF
    The contention raised in this research is to showcase that indigenous African languages are imperative tools in advancing African philosophy and thought. By extension the genuiness and originality of African philosophical thought is best advanced when it is vocalized and transliterated in the mother tongue of the philosopher. When African philosophical thought is done and articulated in language foreign to the philosopher, then that philosophical thought is weakened within the conceptual expression and foundation. It is also contended that, indigenous languages would address perennial problem of inadequacies of languages especially where there are no direct replacement of concept and terms to explain reality and other state of affairs

    The Concept of Beauty in African Philosophy

    Get PDF
    This article contributes to the ongoing discussion on African aesthetics by presenting concept of beauty or the beautiful as it evolved from the cultural conception of beauty to the philosophical shift in the concept. It also examined Western concept of beauty in order to show the different contexts of the meaning of beauty in Africa and Western philosophies. In the paper, I focused primarily on analyzing beauty concept in terms of what constitutes beauty and how the beautiful can be known. I showed that unlike individualistic conception of beauty in Western philosophy, beauty concept in African philosophy is both relational and functional. I showed that in African context there is no beauty for beauty’s sake; and that the beautiful is considered in terms of good conducts and physical attractiveness. Finally, I argued that African concept beauty is only intelligible when considered in the context of African ontology

    Revisiting the Seeming Unanimous Verdict on the Great Debate on African Philosophy

    Get PDF
    The great debate on African Philosophy refers to the debate as to whether African Philosophy does exist or not. The debate aroused great interest among Philosophy scholars who were predominantly polarized into two opposing positions - those who denied the existence of African Philosophy and those who insisted on the existence of African Philosophy. The basic questions in the debate include: What constitutes the ‘African’ in African Philosophy? What body of knowledge qualifies as the proper content of the ‘Philosophy’ in African philosophy? The debate raged in the early nineteen seventies and, in fact, throughout the rest of the 20th century. In recent times, a few writers have assumed the arbiter position and, in their writings, passed judgment in favour of the debaters who held that there is African philosophy. Such writers hinge their judgments predominantly on the fact that African philosophy is recently studied in the Philosophy departments of some universities. True as this may seem, the problems are: One, what percentage of African universities study African philosophy? Two, in those Philosophy departments where African philosophy is studied, how many African philosophy courses are studied? Three, at the postgraduate level where sometimes provision is made for students to study African Philosophy as a major course in the programme, what is the ratio of African philosophy courses to other philosophy courses in the curricula of the departments in question. Using the hermeneutic method, this paper takes a critical look at the above-mentioned problems vis a vis finding out whether the acclaimed correct verdict about the great debate on African philosophy actually stands. At a cursory glance, the work may seem a contraction but the crux of the matter is that for Africans to claim to do African philosophy, much more needs to be done in order to sustain the verdict that African Philosophy exists

    How student teachers understand African philosophy

    Get PDF
    The question ‘What constitutes African philosophy?’ was first raised with the publication of Placide Tempels’s seminal work Bantu philosophy in 1959. Tempels’s book inevitably elicited considerable critical response from African philosophers, which culminated in a wide range of publications such as Wiredu’s (1980) Philosophy and an African culture, Hountondji’s (1983) African philosophy: Myth and reality, Oruka’s (1990) Sage philosophy: Indigenous thinkers and modern debate on African philosophy, Shutte’s (1993) Philosophy for Africa, Masolo’s (1994) African philosophy in search of identity and Gyekye’s (1995) An essay of African philosophical thought: The Akan conceptual scheme. It has been over 60 years since the publication of Temples’s book and there continues to be serious debate about African philosophy. This article sought to contribute to the debate on the various conceptions of African philosophy, but with a focus on the challenges of teaching African philosophy to Philosophy of Education students at an open distance learning institution in South Africa. This article discussed the tendency amongst undergraduate Philosophy of Education students to conflate and reduce African philosophy to African cultures and traditions, and to the notion of ubuntu, and sought to understand the reasons for students’ inclination to treat African philosophy in this way. It examined students’ background knowledge of African philosophy, their critical thinking skills and whether their official study materials are selected and packaged in a manner that, in fact, adds to the challenges they face. Finally, the article explored the ways in which Philosophy of Education lecturers can adapt their pedagogy to provide students with a better understanding of African philosophy

    Personhood and Partialism in African Philosophy

    Get PDF
    This article ascertains what philosophical implications can be drawn from the moral idea of personhood dominant in African philosophy. This article aims to go beyond the oft-made submission that this moral idea of personhood is definitive of African moral thought. It does so by advancing discourse with regards to personhood by exploring its relationship with another under-explored idea in African ethics, the idea of partialism. This article ultimately argues that the idea of personhood can be associated with two (related) sorts of partialisms: agent-related and other-centered partialisms

    African Philosophy and the Method of Ordinary Language Philosophy

    Get PDF
    One of the vibrant topics of debate among African and non-African scholars in the 20th and 21st centuries centered on the existence of African philosophy. This debate has been described as unnecessary. What is necessary is, if African philosophy exists, we should show it, do it and write it rather than talking about it, or engaging in endless talks about it. A popular position on the debate is that what is expected to be shown, done and written is philosophy tailored along the stereotyped and paradigmatic sense peculiar to Western philosophy. Interestingly, a non-African scholar, Barry Hallen argues that using the method of ordinary language philosophy, African philosophy is philosophy per se, and should be recognised as such. The focus of this paper is to analyse what Hallen refers to as ordinary language philosophy and explain how it authenticates African philosophy as unique ‘species’ of philosophy, thus, putting an end to the controversy on the ontology of African philosophy

    Sources of Igwebuike philosophy: towards a socio-cultural foundation

    Get PDF
    Igwebuike is at the heart of African philosophy, and in fact, the inner or underlying principle of African philosophy. It is the manner of being in African ontology. Its nearest equivalents in English include complementarity, harmony, communality, etc., however, the preferred concept is complementarity. This paper responds to the question of the sources of Igwebuike philosophy, that is, the raw materials from which Igwebuike philosophy is gotten. Being an African philosophy, there would be no better place to look for its sources except from the African socio-cultural background. It discovered that the sources of Igwebuike philosophy include the works of professional African philosophers, African proverbs, African folktales, African myths, African symbols, African songs, African names. This piece, therefore, studied these sources to see how much they uniquely contribute towards the development of Igwebuike philosophy. In the course of this research, the phenomenological and hermeneutical methods of inquiry were employed. The paper submits that Igwebuike philosophy is based on the Igbo socio-cultural foundation.Keywords: Igwebuike, Philosophy, African, Socio-Cultural, Foundatio
    corecore