12 research outputs found

    Chasing Mr. C: Early Motion-Picture Exhibition in Robeson County, North Carolina (1896-1950)

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    This dissertation seeks to document the development of early moviegoing in a specific North Carolina county during the first half-century of commercial film exhibitions. Several local factors resulted in exhibition developments that often did not conform--or only partially conformed--to the metro-centric narratives that have dominated U.S. cinema history. Instead, Robeson's exhibitors and audiences faced a series of economic, socio-cultural, and racial challenges that shaped the highly-contingent and inescapably public activity of moviegoing in the county's rural, highly-decentralized, socially conservative, and racially discriminatory small-town communities. This study depicts local moviegoing as neither a ubiquitous nor fully accessible leisure activity due to: Local demographic factors that delayed the implementation of core commercial infrastructures and slowed the introduction and stabilization of local exhibitions until long after several notable exhibition trends that never meaningfully applied to Robeson had long since reshaped metropolitan moviegoing. The concerns of local civic and religious leaders that nearly resulted in the imposition of a cinema-censorship structure based on a legislative proposal during the 1921 General Assembly that had been co-sponsored by a Robeson County delegate. Local racial codes that sanctioned the tri-segregation of virtually all political, social, religious, and civic spaces, and which led Robeson's exhibitors and audiences (respectively) to construct or navigate aggressively segregated facilities whose locally paradigmatic form, the three-entrance theater, intentionally re-inscribed these codes within physical structures designed to perpetuate the second-class treatment of non-whites.Doctor of Philosoph

    \u3cem\u3eThe Kohn-Hennig Library: A Catalog\u3c/em\u3e

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    August Kohn and his daughter Helen Kohn Hennig were two of South Carolina\u27s greatest book collectors. The object of their collecting was South Caroliniana, in all its variety. Their combined library of more than four thousand titles, now a part of the South Caroliniana Library at the University of South Carolina, includes novels, short stories, and poetry; biographies, sermons, and military histories; pamphlets, maps, and periodicals; and much more. The collection includes both the exceedingly rare and the too easily overlooked (a rich collection of pamphlets, promotional material, and business histories). No corner of the state is excluded, and no subject ignored. The library is particularly rich in Jewish material, a topic especially dear to both collectors. But the wide range of titles catalogued in The Kohn-Hennig Library will inspire, intrigue, and fascinate readers, researchers, and collectors everywhere. In addition to identifying all the titles in that collection, this publication pays tribute to Kohn and Hennig, to book collectors everywhere, and to the joys of book collecting. The volume includes essays by Allen H. Stokes, executive director of the South Caroliniana Library, and Belinda Gergel, a retired history professor and former president of the Historic Columbia Foundation. Excerpted from USC Press

    Recipe for citizenship: Professionalization and power in World War I dietetics

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    This dissertation is an analysis of the professionalization tactics of white, native-born, Protestant, middle-class women who served with the U.S. armed forces as dietitians during World War I. Through the overlapping rubrics of maternalism, citizenship, and professionalism, I examine the ways in which dominant race, class, and gender ideologies inflected their quest for professionalization. I specifically examine the way hospital dietitians infused their expertise with rhetoric of race betterment and national security to acquire distinct status and authority in relation to other female medical/health practitioners. In this study, I locate the ideological origins of Public Law 36, 80 th Congress, establishing the U.S. Women\u27s Medical Specialist Corps, within the cultural sensibilities of American antebellum evangelical health reform movements. Public Law 80-36 (April 16, 1947) authorized Regular Army commissions for dietitians, physical therapists, and occupational therapists. I contend that dietetics, a central force in the rise of the home economics movement, also served as an important portal for women\u27s access to higher education in science and medicine. Finally, I hold that military service was critical to the professionalization of women\u27s labor and claims to citizenship in early twentieth century America. In other words, military service allowed native-born, Protestant, middle- and upper-class, white American women to mobilize, network, and expand the scope of their work, as well as leaven their access to professional resources and political power

    Medicating race : heart disease and durable preoccupations with difference

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    Thesis (Ph. D. in History and Social Study of Science and Technology (HASTS))--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Science, Technology and Society, 2007.Includes bibliographical references (p. 320-350).This dissertation is an examination of intersections of race, pharmaceuticals, and heart disease over the course of the 20th century and today. Each of these parts has had a dynamic history, and when they are invoked together they provide a terrain for arguments about interventions in health and in justice in the present. An enduring aspect of discourses of heart disease over the past century has been articulating connections between characterizations of the modem American way of life and of heart disease. In that process, heart disease research and practice has participated in differentiating Americans, especially by race. This dissertation uses heart disease categories and the drugs prescribed for them as windows into racialized medicine. The chapters are organized in a way that is roughly chronological, beginning with the emergence of cardiology as a specialty just before World War II and the landmark longitudinal Framingham Heart Study that began shortly thereafter. A central chapter tracks the emergence and mobilization of African American hypertension as a disease category since the 1960s.(cont.) Two final chapters attend to current racial invocations of two pharmaceuticals: thiazide and BiDil. Using methods from critical historiography of race, anthropology, and science studies, this thesis provides an account of race in medicine with interdisciplinary relevance. By attending to continuities and discontinuities over the period, this thesis illustrates that race in heart disease research and practice has been a durable preoccupation. Racialized medicine has used epistemologically eclectic notions of race, drawing variously on heterogeneous aspects that are both material and semiotic. This underlying ambiguity is central to the productivity of the recorded category of race. American practices of medicating race have also been mediating it, arbitrating and intervening on new and renewed articulations of inclusion and difference in democratic and racialized American ways of life.by Anne Pollock.Ph.D.in History and Social Study of Science and Technology (HAST

    The evolution of the education of exceptional children in Charleston, South Carolina from 1900 to 1975

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    The purpose of this research was to identify and describe the services provided for exceptional children in the public school system of Charleston, South Carolina from 1900 to 1975. An historical approach examined the events which resulted in the establishment of special classes before services were federally mandated. Classes were established during this period incorporating a variety of interventions for the mentally retarded, the deaf and hard of hearing, the blind and vision impaired, the speech impaired and eventually the learning disabled, the behaviorally disabled and the gifted. Admission procedures, teacher qualifications and parental involvement were investigated. The attitude of the administration, the interaction between the regular and special classes and the various shifts in placement were described. Pertinent economic and policical factors directly or indirectly influencing the evolution of special classes were also discussed

    TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA STATE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE FOR THE YEAR 1914

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    The South Carolina State Hospital, first named the South Carolina Lunatic Asylum, was completed in 1828 in Columbia as one of the first asylums in the county built expressly for the mentally ill and funded by the state government. The State Hospital published an annual report on its activities, needs, and goals. Detailed statistics are often provided on the patient population

    EIGHTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA STATE HOSPITAL for the INSANE FOR THE YEAR NINETEEN HUNDRED AND NINE

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    The South Carolina State Hospital, first named the South Carolina Lunatic Asylum, was completed in 1828 in Columbia as one of the first asylums in the county built expressly for the mentally ill and funded by the state government. The State Hospital published an annual report on its activities, needs, and goals. Detailed statistics are often provided on the patient population

    Eighty-Fifth Annual Report OF THE South Carolina State Hospital for the Insane For the Year Nineteen Hundred and Eight

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    The South Carolina State Hospital, first named the South Carolina Lunatic Asylum, was completed in 1828 in Columbia as one of the first asylums in the county built expressly for the mentally ill and funded by the state government. The State Hospital published an annual report on its activities, needs, and goals. Detailed statistics are often provided on the patient population

    TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH OF SOUTH CAROLINA FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1907, TO THE LEGISLATURE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

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    This annual report from the South Carolina State Board of Health includes reports from its various divisions, statistical data concerning health issues and a list of board members

    Public Health Rep

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