1,169,310 research outputs found

    Art, Artifact, Archive: African American Experiences in the Nineteenth Century

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    Angelo Scarlato’s extraordinary and vast collection of art and artifacts related to the Civil War, and specifically to the Battle of Gettysburg, the United States Colored Troops, slavery and the African American struggle for emancipation, citizenship and freedom has proved to be an extraordinary resource for Gettysburg College students. The 2012-14 exhibition in Musselman Library’s Special Collections, curated by Lauren Roedner ’13, entitled Slaves, Soldiers, Citizens: African American Artifacts of the Civil War Era and its corresponding catalogue provided a powerful and comprehensive historical narrative of the period. This fall, students in my course at Gettysburg College “Art and Public Policy”—Diane Brennan, Maura Conley, Abigail Conner, Nicole Conte, Victoria Perez-Zetune, Savannah Rose, Kaylyn Sawyer, Caroline Wood and Zoe Yeoh—selected additional objects of material and print culture from Angelo’s private collection and drew from Lauren’s expertise for the exhibition Art, Artifact, Archive: African American Experiences in the Nineteenth Century to investigate public representations of a newly freed population as well as their more personal perspectives. [excerpt]https://cupola.gettysburg.edu/artcatalogs/1015/thumbnail.jp

    A QUALITATIVE INQUIRY OF FACTORS AFFECTING RETENTION AND GRADUATION OF AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

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    African American university students experience lower levels of retention on college campuses (Tinto, 2012). Academic support is important during the first year of college to increase the likelihood of future success. Therefore, it is crucial that African American university students, who sometimes find themselves isolated in a predominantly White institution, are given a range of social and academic support that eases the transition into college (Tinto, 2012). This will result in African American students staying within the institution to complete their college degree. The purpose of this phenomenological qualitative study was to explore personal and institutional factors affecting retention and graduation of African American students in higher education. The study focused on the experiences of African American students in a mentoring program at the university. The program focused on skilled-based development, academic support and career opportunities to enhance the overall academic success of African American students within the institution. The significance of the study was to understand, from the student perceptions, the role of the higher education institution in improving the student support base system including peer mentoring, faculty engagement, financial support and academic support

    Review of Writing American Cultures: Stories of Identity, Community, and Place

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    Review of Writing American Culture: Stories of Identity, Community & Place. Sam Schrager, Ed. Olympia, WA: The Evergreen State College Press, 2013, 251 pp. This collection of ethnographic essays was produced by students in the 2011-2012 Writing American Cultures Program at the Evergreen State College. Each contribution shows how advanced interdisciplinary work, pursued in a learning community, can result in powerful, critically astute writing and analysis by undergraduates

    Eurydice Program [2012]

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    By Sarah Ruhl Directed by Meghan Brodie This production was a Participating entry in the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KC/ACTF).https://digitalcommons.usm.maine.edu/theatre-programs-2011-2012/1003/thumbnail.jp

    The Zoo Story and The American Dream Program

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    By Edward Albee Directed by William Steele This production was a Participating entry in the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KC/ACTF).https://digitalcommons.usm.maine.edu/theatre-programs-2012-2013/1005/thumbnail.jp

    The Glass Menagerie Program [2012]

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    By Tennessee Williams Directed by Thomas Power This production was a Participating entry in the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KC/ACTF).https://digitalcommons.usm.maine.edu/theatre-programs-2012-2013/1003/thumbnail.jp

    Hedda Gabler Program [2012]

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    By Henrik Ibsen Directed by William Steele This production was a Participating entry in the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KC/ACTF).https://digitalcommons.usm.maine.edu/theatre-programs-2011-2012/1005/thumbnail.jp

    Medical School Watercooler Newsletter June 27, 2010

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    This is the June 27, 2010 edition of the Frederick P. Whiddon College of Medicine\u27s newsletter - Watercooler. Contents Include: USA Research Examines Biomagnetic Signals of Intestinal Ischemia Dr. Charles Rodning Installed As President of American College of Surgeons, Alabama Chapter Fireworks & Hot Grills Class of 2012 Medical Students Receive White Coats at Annual White Coat Ceremon

    Exploring the Lived Experiences of African American Female College Presidents: The Path to Presidency in Higher Education

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    According to the American College President Survey of 2017, 30% of college presidents across the country are female, and only 5% of that population is represented by women of color (Gagliardi et al., 2017). Diversity in leadership positions, more specifically in the higher education sector, is a critical need as higher education institutions continue to develop sustainability strategies in response to impending demographic changes (Virick & Greer, 2012). The purpose of this phenomenological qualitative research study was to describe the lived experiences, pathways, and successful strategies used during career trajectory by former or current African American female college presidents in the United States. Framed by intersectionality and Black feminist thought, a phenomenological qualitative research study utilized data from six African American women who were serving, or had served, as college presidents in the United States. The findings revealed that while African American female college president had an overall positive experience during their pathway to presidency, remnants of racial discrimination, gender discrimination, and the Queen Bee Syndrome had an impact on their career trajectory. Despite these roadblocks, it was determined that internal confidence, mentorships and professional development opportunities, specialized skill sets, and a community of support led to them to achieving college presidency. The findings of this study can be utilized by aspiring African American female college presidents, current university governing bodies or boards, and university human resource professionals within the United States higher education system to identify and implement strategies that better support aspirant college presidents

    The Perceived Factors That Influenced African American Male Students’ Persistence at a Southeastern Community College

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    This basic qualitative study examined the perceived factors that influenced African American male students’ persistence to acquire community college completion in the U.S. Southeast. It investigated the academic, cocurricular, and environmental intrinsic and extrinsic support systems of African American community college students who were successfully persisting toward degree obtainment. While the work highlights the challenges of these students as outlined in the published literature to frame their concerns, the study drew on Harper’s (2015) invitation to consider shifting the emphasis from Black male disadvantage to strategies that create an advantage using an antideficit framework. Harper’s (2010, 2012) antideficit achievement framework informed the study to document influential factors that aid African American male students in community college degree completion. One research question guided data collection via interviews: What are the perceived factors that influenced African American male students’ persistence to acquire community college completion in North Carolina? Examining the lived experiences of African American male students at a predominantly White community college provided awareness of the intrinsic and extrinsic support measures that may lead to successful academic outcomes for this student population. The 12 participants disclosed significant influences, leading to 3 categories or themes—Pursuing Achievement, Preparation Shift, and Engagement Influence—that emerged from analyzed data; these themes highlighted specific intrinsic and extrinsic support measures that enabled their successful academic outcomes. Recommended actions are provided to assist college-level educational organizations in designing strategies for keeping all African American male community college students on their degree-completion paths
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