3,120 research outputs found

    Geometries of Nation-Building: Triangulating Female Homosociality in Richardson’s Wacousta

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    Female homosociality is critical to the theme of nation-building in Wacousta but, unlike male homosociality, has been almost entirely overlooked in critical treatments of the novel. The novel's ending, for instance, suggests that only the white characters who have indigenized through the agency of cross-cultural female homosociality survive to produce a "Canadian" generation. The challenge of such female-dominated homosocial triangles (for example, Oucanasta-Frederick-Madeline) to male-dominated homosocial triangles (Charles-Everard-Clara) is significant in that it deviates from European literary patterns, replacing the patriarchal structure of old-world society with a community that instead emphasizes strong female and native influences

    Hiding Behind the Closet Door: Representations of the Homosexual Experience in A Streetcar Named Desire

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    Themes related to homosexuality and the homosexual experience are interwoven in many layers throughout Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire. This research paper analyzes contemporary commentary on homosexuality from the 1940s and ‘50s, Blanche’s experiences with light and perception, and moments of homosociality between the male poker players, to interpret how the homosexual experience is represented and exposed on stage through the two main characters in the play, Blanche and Stanley. Williams uses a heteronormative context to portray the homosexual experience, thus mirroring the way gay men had to navigate life in the closet while presenting to the public a façade that mimicked that of the hetero-norm. Ultimately, Williams uses illusions to make a comment on the greater society’s attitudes towards homosexuals. Homosexuals were forced to present themselves in illusory manners to be accepted within society; they had to navigate the world inside and outside “the closet”. Thus, Williams uses this theme of illusion and perception in various instances in the play to showcase this type of mentality. Also explored is the concept of the homosexual v. homosocial. The Poker Night scene exemplifies the concept of the homosocial and serves as another avenue through which the homosexual experience is evoked. We see, through Blanche and Stanley, the way homosexual themes were incorporated from small lighting details to a larger scope present within male relationships in the play. Undoubtedly, there is so much more to do with homosexuality in Streetcar than readers may originally realize, and this paper only dips our toes into a newer lens through which Streetcar can be viewed and analyzed

    The erotic charisma of Alexander Hamilton

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    As an outsider with a mysterious childhood, Alexander Hamilton is, as psychologists say, a good "hook" for a projective identification. For his admirers Hamilton is a source of political capital. His ideas and proposals about the debt, protectionism, and an American manufacturing base are in the news in the early twenty-first century. Although the Old Left saw Hamilton as an elitist, possibly a monarchist, and a promoter of industrial capitalism, contemporary American progressives have called attention to his explicit support for habeas corpus, his efforts on behalf of banking, and his surprisingly enlightened attitudes about race and slavery. As one of the founders of a new republic, Hamilton knew he would be in the history books, but his image, representations of his physical presence, and speculation about his private life circulate on the Internet in ways that would surely astonish him. Alexander Hamilton not only has admirers in the fields of politics and history; he also has fans. © 2010 Cambridge University Press

    Negative Intra-gender Relations between Women: Friendships, Competition, and Female Misogyny

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    The following chapter explores the nature of women’s negative intra-gender social relations, offering new insights into gendered organizations and how gendered organizing processes impact upon social interactions and relationships between women. We theorize women’s negative intra-gender relations by fusing theory in the areas of doing gender well and differently (Mavin and Grandy 2011); gendered contexts; homophily (Lazarsfeld and Merton 1954) and homosociality (Gruenfeld and Tiedens 2005); women’s intra-gender competition (Campbell, 2004), and processes of female misogyny (Mavin, 2006a, b), as complex interlocking gendered practices and processes (Acker 2009). Our contribution is a conceptual framework of women’s intra-gender relations, which reveals under-researched, often hidden forms of gender in action. We extend the theoretical development of women’s negative relations by recognizing that they have the power to limit the potential for homosocial and homophilous relations between women and conclude by offering questions to guide future research agendas

    Inclusivity, Horizontal Homosociality and Controlled Participation of “The Others” : Negotiations of Masculinity and Ageing in Two Older Men’s Communities

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    Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.Theories of inclusive masculinity and horizontal homosociality describe how previously marginalized forms of masculinity are becoming socially acceptable. Studies within these theoretical frameworks have largely focused on privileged groups of men and men’s changing attitudes towards homosexuality. This raises questions about the extent to which the theories apply to marginalized groups of men and other inequalities between men. In this article, we analyse ethnographic data from two Finnish older men’s communities that emphasize equality between men as an essential part of their ethos, and ask how inclusive practices and horizontal homosociality operate in these communities. Our intersectional analysis shows that older men’s communities may involve varying levels of inclusive practices that do not necessarily relate to sexuality but, instead, to other aspects of inequality. Future studies should consider the contextuality of men’s practices and the intersectional differences between men that are the subjects of these inclusive or exclusionary practices.Peer reviewe

    “A Cathartic Moment in a Man’s Life”: Homosociality and Gendered Fun on the Puttan Tour

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    Rarely addressed in academic scholarship, the puttan tour is a well-known form of entertainment in Italy where young men drive around in small groups with the aim of spotting street sex workers. On some occasions, the participants will approach the sex workers to strike up a conversation. On others, they will shout out insults from their car then drive away. This article aims to advance a detailed analysis of this underexplored cultural practice drawing on a diverse body of scholarship exploring the intersection of masculinity, leisure, and homosociality. By analyzing stories of puttan tours gathered mostly online, including written accounts and YouTube videos, our aim is to explore the appeal of the puttan tour through an analysis of how homosociality, humor, and laughter operate in this example of gendered fun. To this end, we look at the multiple and often equivocal meanings of this homosocial male-bonding ritual, its emotional and affective dynamics, and the ways in which it reproduces structures of inequality while normalizing violence against sex workers

    Malayali young men and their movie heroes

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    Here we bring together masculinities and popular culture to think about how they are configured within the arena of cinema, focusing in on Kerala's two major male movie stars and the relationship they have with their young male fans. In their relative lack of interest in female stars and turn towards male stars young men are playing out an approach towards gendering which does not take as its foundation hierarchic or compulsory heterosexuality. Young men's tentative (and illicit, difficult) relationships with young women lack the substance of their relationships with each other and with their male movie heroes. We consider cinema as a forum for collective fantasy which acts as a source of helpful orientations, stars being particular nodes within this arena, dense points of transfer of desire, belief, self-affirmation or transformation and so on. Film audiences receive or subvert cinematic messages and form relationships with stars - whether in fantasy or actually - and with each other, mediated through cinematic modes of being or styles of doing. Another effect of cinema-related activities is to provide adolescent and post-adolescent boys with a safe segregated social space in which they can socialise, share information, try out fledgling masculine identities and grapple with the demands of emerging sexualities. The star makes possible identifications with the self- (for Mohan Lal, one who is working class and in solidarity with the poor, in Mammootty's case a solidly bourgeoios self); transformations of the self - opportunities through fan association work to distribute largesse like a high-caste wealthy patron; and an extended sense of self - the possiblity that through the fan association one might participate in the star's power and reach. In Kerala, unlike other states, fandom is not a matter of rivalry, political partisanship or even life and death. While there is a 'hard-core' central group who remain partisan and always committed to 'their' star, in general young men frequently shift associations and change allegiances. Yet the two heroes seem to embody different styles of hero and to have different types of appeal to audiences; sociologically, their fan bases trace slightly different social groupings. Mammootty has an affinity with roles implying powerful and high-status men in control, strong in family drama; Mohan Lal is admired for his abilities in romance, song, dance and fighting. One might wish to be like Mammootty but often feels that one already is in some way like Mohan Lal. Despite considerable overlap and dispute, Mammootty and Mohan Lal embody and perform different styles of manliness, none of which one could dispense with in one's potential repertiore. Both Mammootty and Mohan Lal are necessary in a full fantasy life and a necessarily internally fragmented and shifting gendered identity. Cinema also relates to ethnicity. Mammotty allows young non-Muslim men to experience a fantasy relationship with a powerful mature Muslim man, a community coded 'other' in Kerala. A twist to this is that (similar to analyses of white anglo masculinities and work on the 'blackness' of Elvis) we find working class Hindu masculinity, while explicitly defined in opposition to the Muslim other, at another level actually relies upon an incorporation of aspects of masculinity especially associated in the cultural landscape with Muslimness. In a more mediated and disguised manner, Mohan Lal also plays with elements of fantasy identity culturally coded by young Hindus as 'Muslim'

    Brothers as Men: Masculinity, Homosociality, and Violence Among Fraternity Men

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    A significant aspect of gender study, specifically when dealing with men, is the idea that there is no single masculinity and that there are many different constructions of masculinity. This project engages fraternity men about their constructions of masculinity and how these constructions affect behavior. In addition to these constructions of masculinity, this study is concerned with issues of homosociality and views of sexual violence. This project utilizes research techniques including semi-structured and structured interviews as well as free listing and pile sorting

    #WeKnowWhatYouDid: An Ethnographic Exploration of Male Socialization and Rape Culture at a Black College for Men

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    This study will explore the connections, if any, between male socialization and rape culture at a Black college for men by asking the research question, “How does male socialization at Morehouse College affect the students’ understanding of rape culture?” Rape culture refers to a society or environment whose prevailing social attitudes have the effect of normalizing or trivializing sexual assault and abuse. As this study seeks to capture the culture of the campus, it will take on a critical ethnographic approach. While engaging in semi-structured interviews with self-identified Black, former students of Morehouse College, this study will also engage two other data collection methods: participant observation and a social media analysis in hopes of contributing to the literature on rape culture, gender relations, and masculinity in the field of African American studies
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