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    The First Records in Illinois of \u3ci\u3eHeliconius Charitonius\u3c/i\u3e (Lepidoptera: Heliconiidae) and \u3ci\u3ePhoebis Agarithe\u3c/i\u3e (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

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    (excerpt) Our key to Illinois butterflies, exclusive of the skippers (Hesperiidae), was published in 1980. It includes those butterflies listed by Irwin and Downey in their 1973 Illinois checklist plus two species,Anaea aidea (Guerin-Meneville) (Nymphalidae) and Celastrina ebenina Clench (Lycaenidae), added to the state list after 1973

    Annotated Records of Species of Pentatomoidea (Hemiptera) Collected at Lights

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    Records of specimens of Pentatomoidea collected at various light sources in Alabama, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, and Texas are presented. Of the 51 species and subspecies reported, about 75% belong to the Pentatomidae

    Translated identities: 'Pakeha' as subjects of the Treaty of Waitangi

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    The politics of translation is clearly a perennial focus of debate in New Zealand, as shown by thematic links between the New Zealand social anthropology conferences at Waikato in 1990 and Auckland in 2004. Of the many issues of translation swirling around ongoing attempts to interpret the Treaty of Waitangi, a surprisingly neglected one concerns the identities of the people on behalf of whom the Crown signed the Treaty. The term 'Pakeha' appears only once in the Treaty, the question of whom it refers to is by no means straightforward, and it would be unwise to presume that it had the same range of meanings in 1840 as it does in present-day biculturalism. This point is demonstrated by a re-reading of historical material concerning the parties present at or implicated in the signing of the Treaty, including the so-called Pakeha Maori

    Breaking the consensus: The politicisation of Maori affairs

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    This article takes issue with the claim made by Tremewan (2005a) that the New Zealand social sciences have been uncritical of neotraditionalist and culturalist trends in social policy. It points out that at least since the 1980s there has existed a significant body of social science literature critical of these trends. The article also takes issue with Tremewan’s attribution of increased political dissent in the area of Maori affairs to the culturalist ideological currents dominating social policy. The article provides an alternative explanation for this increase in political dissent by focusing upon the material conditions of existence and the opportunism of power-seeking politicians

    A List of the Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea) of the La Rue-Pine Hills Ecological Area

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    A survey of the adult butterfly fauna of the La Rue-Pine Hills Ecological Area, Union County, Illinois, was conducted from March through July in 1979, and March through November in 1980. Forty nine species and subspecies were collected including all six papilionids known to occur in Illinois. Notes were taken on seasonal flight periods and butterfly-plant associations

    Diagnostic Efficacy of Morphological Characters of Larval \u3ci\u3eTramea Lacerata\u3c/i\u3e Hagen and \u3ci\u3eTramea Onusta\u3c/i\u3e Hagen (Odonata: Libellulidae) in the Prairie Region of Missouri

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    Distinguishing among species of larvae of the dragonfly genus Tramea historically has been problematic, largely due to conflicting characterizations of the larvae of T. lacerata Hagen and T. onusta Hagen (Odonata: Libellulidae) in the literature. The various systematic treatments usually focused on relative lengths of morphological characters to distinguish the species, but often contradicted one another and themselves as to what the diagnostic values actually were. We traced much of the confusion back to errors in the original larval description of T. onusta. We used morphometric analyses to determine the efficacy of previously published characterizations to distinguish between the larvae of T. lacerata and T. onusta. Previous characterizations, especially those involving relative lengths of the caudal appendages, were generally found to be inadequate for distinguishing larvae of the two species. The most reliable characteristic for distinguishing the two species was found to be the length of the epiproct relative to the length of the paraprocts

    The utterance, the body and the law: Seeking an approach to concretizing the sacredness of Maori language

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    In what possible ways does the sacredness of a language have application in an everyday, concrete sense – in a contemporary context? If we want to discuss the sacredness of language, can we conceptualise such sacrality in anything other than an abstracted form? I will consider some places where a proposed sacredness of the Maori language might come to bear, and will particularly question its usage within the process of the law. My primary aim in this article is to conceive of ways, however hypothetical, by which the sacredness within Maori language might be removed from its current role of discursive entity and into the active life of the speaker. Thus Maori language, even in its colonized form, may once more take its own place within the spheres of the practical and the sacred at the same time

    Contributions to the faunistics of Odonata in Thailand

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    Distribution and habitat information are provided for 1578 adult specimens of Odonata representing 127 species in 70 genera and 16 families that were collected from 143 locations throughout Thailand. Of the species collected, 25 (20%) were represented by a single specimen, and 40 (31%) were collected from a single location. Collections were made at 49 lentic and 85 lotic sites, and an average of 6.9 and 6.6 species were collected at each site in each habitat, respectively

    The Stink Bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) of Missouri

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    The stink bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) fauna of Missouri was last treated more than 70 years ago. Since then, many more specimens have become available for study, substantial papers on regional faunas have been published, and many revisions and other taxonomic changes have taken place. As a consequence, 40% of the names from the previous Missouri state list have changed or the taxa have been removed. The fauna of stink bugs known from Missouri based on specimens from museums, other collections, and the literature is presented. Included for each species is a general overview of biological and ecological information, overall distribution, and local distribution among Missouri Natural Divisions. Also presented for Missouri specimens are biological label data and extreme dates of adult collection. All totaled, 57 species are now known from the state, eight of which represent new state records: Asopinae: Alcaeorrhynchus grandis (Dallas), Tylospilus acutissimus (Stål); Pentatominae: Banasa calva (Say), Banasa euchlora Stål, Cosmopepla intergressa (Uhler), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), Neottiglossa undata (Say); Podopinae: Amaurochrous brevitylus Barber and Sailer
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