10 research outputs found

    Motional dynamical decoupling for interferometry with macroscopic particles

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    We extend the concept of dynamical decoupling from spin to mechanical degrees of freedom of macroscopic objects, for application in interferometry. In this manner, the superposition of matter waves can be made resilient to many important sources of noise when these are driven along suitable paths in space. As a concrete implementation, we present the case of levitated (or free falling) nanodiamonds hosting a color center in a magnetic field gradient. We point out that these interferometers are inherently affected by diamagnetic forces, which restrict the separation of the superposed states to distances that scale with the inverse of the magnetic field gradient. Periodic forcing of the mechanical degree of freedom is shown to overcome this limitation, achieving a linear-in-time growth of the separation distance independent of the magnetic field gradient, while simultaneously protecting the coherence of the superposition from environmental perturbations

    The Boston University Photonics Center annual report 2013-2014

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    This repository item contains an annual report that summarizes activities of the Boston University Photonics Center in the 2013-2014 academic year. The report provides quantitative and descriptive information regarding photonics programs in education, interdisciplinary research, business innovation, and technology development. The Boston University Photonics Center (BUPC) is an interdisciplinary hub for education, research, scholarship, innovation, and technology development associated with practical uses of light.This annual report summarizes activities of the Boston University Photonics Center in the 2013–2014 academic year.This has been a good year for the Photonics Center. In the following pages, you will see that the center’s faculty received prodigious honors and awards, generated more than 100 notable scholarly publications in the leading journals in our field, and attracted 14.5Minnewresearchgrantsandcontractsthisyear.Facultyandstaffalsoexpandedtheireffortsineducationandtraining,throughNationalScienceFoundation–sponsoredsitesforResearchExperiencesforUndergraduatesandforTeachers.Asacommunity,wehostedacompellingseriesofdistinguishedinvitedspeakers,andemphasizedthethemeofInnovationsattheIntersectionsofMicro/NanofabricationTechnology,Biology,andBiomedicineatourannualFutureofLightSymposium.Wetookaleadershiproleinrunningnationalworkshopsonemergingphotonicfields,includinganOSAIncubatoronControlledLightPropagationthroughComplexMedia,andanNSFWorkshoponNoninvasiveImagingofBrainFunction.HighlightsofourresearchachievementsfortheyearincludeadistinctivePresidentialEarlyCareerAwardforScientistsandEngineers(PECASE)forAssistantProfessorXueHan,anambitiousnewDoD−sponsoredgrantforMulti−ScaleMulti−DisciplinaryModelingofElectronicMaterialsledbyProfessorEnricoBellotti,launchofourNIH−sponsoredCenterforInnovationinPointofCareTechnologiesfortheFutureofCancerCareledbyProfessorCathyKlapperich,andsuccessfulcompletionoftheambitiousIARPA−fundedcontractforNextGenerationSolidImmersionMicroscopyforFaultIsolationinBack−SideCircuitAnalysisledbyProfessorBennettGoldberg.Thesethreeprograms,whichrepresentmorethan14.5M in new research grants and contracts this year. Faculty and staff also expanded their efforts in education and training, through National Science Foundation–sponsored sites for Research Experiences for Undergraduates and for Teachers. As a community, we hosted a compelling series of distinguished invited speakers, and emphasized the theme of Innovations at the Intersections of Micro/Nanofabrication Technology, Biology, and Biomedicine at our annual Future of Light Symposium. We took a leadership role in running national workshops on emerging photonic fields, including an OSA Incubator on Controlled Light Propagation through Complex Media, and an NSF Workshop on Noninvasive Imaging of Brain Function. Highlights of our research achievements for the year include a distinctive Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) for Assistant Professor Xue Han, an ambitious new DoD-sponsored grant for Multi-Scale Multi-Disciplinary Modeling of Electronic Materials led by Professor Enrico Bellotti, launch of our NIH-sponsored Center for Innovation in Point of Care Technologies for the Future of Cancer Care led by Professor Cathy Klapperich, and successful completion of the ambitious IARPA-funded contract for Next Generation Solid Immersion Microscopy for Fault Isolation in Back-Side Circuit Analysis led by Professor Bennett Goldberg. These three programs, which represent more than 20M in research funding for the University, are indicative of the breadth of Photonics Center research interests: from fundamental modeling of optoelectronic materials to practical development of cancer diagnostics, from exciting new discoveries in optogenetics for understanding brain function to the achievement of world-record resolution in semiconductor circuit microscopy. Our community welcomed an auspicious cohort of new faculty members, including a newly hired assistant professor and a newly hired professor (and Chair of the Mechanical Engineering Department). The Industry/University Cooperative Research Center—the centerpiece of our translational biophotonics program—continues to focus on advancing the health care and medical device industries, and has entered its fourth year of operation with a strong record of achievement and with the support of an enthusiastic industrial membership base

    The Boston University Photonics Center annual report 2013-2014

    Full text link
    This repository item contains an annual report that summarizes activities of the Boston University Photonics Center in the 2013-2014 academic year. The report provides quantitative and descriptive information regarding photonics programs in education, interdisciplinary research, business innovation, and technology development. The Boston University Photonics Center (BUPC) is an interdisciplinary hub for education, research, scholarship, innovation, and technology development associated with practical uses of light.This annual report summarizes activities of the Boston University Photonics Center in the 2013–2014 academic year.This has been a good year for the Photonics Center. In the following pages, you will see that the center’s faculty received prodigious honors and awards, generated more than 100 notable scholarly publications in the leading journals in our field, and attracted 14.5Minnewresearchgrantsandcontractsthisyear.Facultyandstaffalsoexpandedtheireffortsineducationandtraining,throughNationalScienceFoundation–sponsoredsitesforResearchExperiencesforUndergraduatesandforTeachers.Asacommunity,wehostedacompellingseriesofdistinguishedinvitedspeakers,andemphasizedthethemeofInnovationsattheIntersectionsofMicro/NanofabricationTechnology,Biology,andBiomedicineatourannualFutureofLightSymposium.Wetookaleadershiproleinrunningnationalworkshopsonemergingphotonicfields,includinganOSAIncubatoronControlledLightPropagationthroughComplexMedia,andanNSFWorkshoponNoninvasiveImagingofBrainFunction.HighlightsofourresearchachievementsfortheyearincludeadistinctivePresidentialEarlyCareerAwardforScientistsandEngineers(PECASE)forAssistantProfessorXueHan,anambitiousnewDoD−sponsoredgrantforMulti−ScaleMulti−DisciplinaryModelingofElectronicMaterialsledbyProfessorEnricoBellotti,launchofourNIH−sponsoredCenterforInnovationinPointofCareTechnologiesfortheFutureofCancerCareledbyProfessorCathyKlapperich,andsuccessfulcompletionoftheambitiousIARPA−fundedcontractforNextGenerationSolidImmersionMicroscopyforFaultIsolationinBack−SideCircuitAnalysisledbyProfessorBennettGoldberg.Thesethreeprograms,whichrepresentmorethan14.5M in new research grants and contracts this year. Faculty and staff also expanded their efforts in education and training, through National Science Foundation–sponsored sites for Research Experiences for Undergraduates and for Teachers. As a community, we hosted a compelling series of distinguished invited speakers, and emphasized the theme of Innovations at the Intersections of Micro/Nanofabrication Technology, Biology, and Biomedicine at our annual Future of Light Symposium. We took a leadership role in running national workshops on emerging photonic fields, including an OSA Incubator on Controlled Light Propagation through Complex Media, and an NSF Workshop on Noninvasive Imaging of Brain Function. Highlights of our research achievements for the year include a distinctive Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) for Assistant Professor Xue Han, an ambitious new DoD-sponsored grant for Multi-Scale Multi-Disciplinary Modeling of Electronic Materials led by Professor Enrico Bellotti, launch of our NIH-sponsored Center for Innovation in Point of Care Technologies for the Future of Cancer Care led by Professor Cathy Klapperich, and successful completion of the ambitious IARPA-funded contract for Next Generation Solid Immersion Microscopy for Fault Isolation in Back-Side Circuit Analysis led by Professor Bennett Goldberg. These three programs, which represent more than 20M in research funding for the University, are indicative of the breadth of Photonics Center research interests: from fundamental modeling of optoelectronic materials to practical development of cancer diagnostics, from exciting new discoveries in optogenetics for understanding brain function to the achievement of world-record resolution in semiconductor circuit microscopy. Our community welcomed an auspicious cohort of new faculty members, including a newly hired assistant professor and a newly hired professor (and Chair of the Mechanical Engineering Department). The Industry/University Cooperative Research Center—the centerpiece of our translational biophotonics program—continues to focus on advancing the health care and medical device industries, and has entered its fourth year of operation with a strong record of achievement and with the support of an enthusiastic industrial membership base

    The Boston University Photonics Center annual report 2014-2015

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    This repository item contains an annual report that summarizes activities of the Boston University Photonics Center in the 2014-2015 academic year. The report provides quantitative and descriptive information regarding photonics programs in education, interdisciplinary research, business innovation, and technology development. The Boston University Photonics Center (BUPC) is an interdisciplinary hub for education, research, scholarship, innovation, and technology development associated with practical uses of light.This has been a good year for the Photonics Center. In the following pages, you will see that the center’s faculty received prodigious honors and awards, generated more than 100 notable scholarly publications in the leading journals in our field, and attracted $18.6M in new research grants/contracts. Faculty and staff also expanded their efforts in education and training, and were awarded two new National Science Foundation– sponsored sites for Research Experiences for Undergraduates and for Teachers. As a community, we hosted a compelling series of distinguished invited speakers, and emphasized the theme of Advanced Materials by Design for the 21st Century at our annual symposium. We continued to support the National Photonics Initiative, and are a part of a New York–based consortium that won the competition for a new photonics- themed node in the National Network of Manufacturing Institutes. Highlights of our research achievements for the year include an ambitious new DoD-sponsored grant for Multi-Scale Multi-Disciplinary Modeling of Electronic Materials led by Professor Enrico Bellotti, continued support of our NIH-sponsored Center for Innovation in Point of Care Technologies for the Future of Cancer Care led by Professor Catherine Klapperich, a new award for Personalized Chemotherapy Through Rapid Monitoring with Wearable Optics led by Assistant Professor Darren Roblyer, and a new award from DARPA to conduct research on Calligraphy to Build Tunable Optical Metamaterials led by Professor Dave Bishop. We were also honored to receive an award from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center to develop a biophotonics laboratory in our Business Innovation Center

    The Boston University Photonics Center annual report 2014-2015

    Full text link
    This repository item contains an annual report that summarizes activities of the Boston University Photonics Center in the 2014-2015 academic year. The report provides quantitative and descriptive information regarding photonics programs in education, interdisciplinary research, business innovation, and technology development. The Boston University Photonics Center (BUPC) is an interdisciplinary hub for education, research, scholarship, innovation, and technology development associated with practical uses of light.This has been a good year for the Photonics Center. In the following pages, you will see that the center’s faculty received prodigious honors and awards, generated more than 100 notable scholarly publications in the leading journals in our field, and attracted $18.6M in new research grants/contracts. Faculty and staff also expanded their efforts in education and training, and were awarded two new National Science Foundation– sponsored sites for Research Experiences for Undergraduates and for Teachers. As a community, we hosted a compelling series of distinguished invited speakers, and emphasized the theme of Advanced Materials by Design for the 21st Century at our annual symposium. We continued to support the National Photonics Initiative, and are a part of a New York–based consortium that won the competition for a new photonics- themed node in the National Network of Manufacturing Institutes. Highlights of our research achievements for the year include an ambitious new DoD-sponsored grant for Multi-Scale Multi-Disciplinary Modeling of Electronic Materials led by Professor Enrico Bellotti, continued support of our NIH-sponsored Center for Innovation in Point of Care Technologies for the Future of Cancer Care led by Professor Catherine Klapperich, a new award for Personalized Chemotherapy Through Rapid Monitoring with Wearable Optics led by Assistant Professor Darren Roblyer, and a new award from DARPA to conduct research on Calligraphy to Build Tunable Optical Metamaterials led by Professor Dave Bishop. We were also honored to receive an award from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center to develop a biophotonics laboratory in our Business Innovation Center

    Gap and channelled plasmons in tapered grooves: a review

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    Tapered metallic grooves have been shown to support plasmons -- electromagnetically coupled oscillations of free electrons at metal-dielectric interfaces -- across a variety of configurations and V-like profiles. Such plasmons may be divided into two categories: gap-surface plasmons (GSPs) that are confined laterally between the tapered groove sidewalls and propagate either along the groove axis or normal to the planar surface, and channelled plasmon polaritons (CPPs) that occupy the tapered groove profile and propagate exclusively along the groove axis. Both GSPs and CPPs exhibit an assortment of unique properties that are highly suited to a broad range of cutting-edge nanoplasmonic technologies, including ultracompact photonic circuits, quantum-optics components, enhanced lab-on-a-chip devices, efficient light-absorbing surfaces and advanced optical filters, while additionally affording a niche platform to explore the fundamental science of plasmon excitations and their interactions. In this Review, we provide a research status update of plasmons in tapered grooves, starting with a presentation of the theory and important features of GSPs and CPPs, and follow with an overview of the broad range of applications they enable or improve. We cover the techniques that can fabricate tapered groove structures, in particular highlighting wafer-scale production methods, and outline the various photon- and electron-based approaches that can be used to launch and study GSPs and CPPs. We conclude with a discussion of the challenges that remain for further developing plasmonic tapered-groove devices, and consider the future directions offered by this select yet potentially far-reaching topic area.Comment: 32 pages, 34 figure

    Investigation of mechanical properties of graphene on silicon wafers

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    University of Technology Sydney. Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology.Graphene is an atomically thin two-dimensional crystalline material with very low mass, high Young’s modulus, high elastic strength, high optical transparency, high-electron mobility, high thermal conductivity and high degree of biocompatibility. Due to these extraordinary properties, graphene has many promising applications. Graphene can be synthesized in vastly different ways, for example by chemical vapour deposition and micromechanical exfoliation. However, the invariably poor graphene/substrate adhesion energy is a major drawback for ensuring the reliability, stability and longevity of sensors and other micro- and nano-mechanical devices, precluding us from achieving semiconductor technology requirements and rendering manufacturing efforts futile. Therefore, synthesising wafer level graphene that has sufficient quality and adhesion with the substrate is still an open and critical research problem. To address these issues, we have demonstrated for the first time a fivefold improvement in adhesion between graphene and its underlying substrate, using a transfer-free, catalytic alloy approach for synthesising a monolayer of graphene on silicon carbide on silicon. An interfacial adhesion energy of 5.7 J/m² between graphene and silicon carbide is found using double cantilever beam testing, as compared to 1.02 J/m² reported for transferred graphene on silicon dioxide. As the obtained adhesion energy is a good starting point for achieving reliable resonant sensors, we have fabricated and evaluated graphene coated silicon carbide membranes, showing quality factor () as high as 2.7x10⁴. We have also investigated the influence of graphene coating on the quality factor of the silicon carbide membrane resonators and reported a significant reduction in damping when a graphene overlayer is present on silicon carbide membranes instead of a conventional metal layer

    Optomechanical, vibrational and thermal properties of suspended graphene membranes

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    Le but de la Nano- Opto- Mécanique et Electronic à base de graphène est d'utiliser des membranes de graphène en suspension comme blocs de construction pour aborder le couplage entre l'optique, la mécanique et l'électronique dans ce nouveau matériau. Avec un module d'Young similaire à celui du diamant (1 TPA), le graphène est une membrane extrêmement rigide, légère et mince (epaaisseur de seulement un atome) qui peut supporter son propre poids sans effondrement ou la rupture lorsqu'il est suspendu. Ces membranes, intégrées dans des dispositifs mécaniques, peuvent être actionnés à partir de DC jusqu'à des fréquences de vibration mécaniques très élevées (GHz). En outre, le graphène est un gaz d'électrons 2D exposé pour lequel une porte électrostatique tunes considérablement la densité de porteurs de charge et ses propriétés optiques. Last but not least, il offre une architecture unique pour effectuer la fonctionnalisation physico-chimiques et obtenir des matériaux hybrides combinant les propriétés particulières des espèces chimisorbées avec ceux du graphène.The aim of the Graphene Nano- Opto- Mechanics and Electronics is to use suspended graphene membranes as building blocks to address the coupling of optics, mechanics and electronics in this novel material. With a Young modulus similar to that of diamond (1 TPa), graphene is an extremely stiff, light and atomically thin membrane that can withstand its own weight without collapsing or breaking when suspended. Such membranes, integrated as mechanical devices, can be actuated from DC up to very high mechanical vibration frequencies (GHz). Moreover, graphene is an exposed 2D electron gas for which an electrostatic gate dramatically tunes the charge carrier density and its optical properties. Last but not least, it provides a unique architecture to perform physico-chemical functionalization and obtain hybrid materials combining the peculiar properties of adsorbed and chemisorbed species with the graphene ones

    Propriétés optomécaniques, vibrationelles et thermiques de membranes de graphène suspendues

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    The aim of the Graphene Nano- Opto- Mechanics and Electronics is to use suspended graphene membranes as building blocks to address the coupling of optics, mechanics and electronics in this novel material. With a Young modulus similar to that of diamond (1 TPa), graphene is an extremely stiff, light and atomically thin membrane that can withstand its own weight without collapsing or breaking when suspended. Such membranes, integrated as mechanical devices, can be actuated from DC up to very high mechanical vibration frequencies (GHz). Moreover, graphene is an exposed 2D electron gas for which an electrostatic gate dramatically tunes the charge carrier density and its optical properties. Last but not least, it provides a unique architecture to perform physico-chemical functionalization and obtain hybrid materials combining the peculiar properties of adsorbed and chemisorbed species with the graphene ones.Le but de la Nano- Opto- Mécanique et Electronic à base de graphène est d'utiliser des membranes de graphène en suspension comme blocs de construction pour aborder le couplage entre l'optique, la mécanique et l'électronique dans ce nouveau matériau. Avec un module d'Young similaire à celui du diamant (1 TPA), le graphène est une membrane extrêmement rigide, légère et mince (epaaisseur de seulement un atome) qui peut supporter son propre poids sans effondrement ou la rupture lorsqu'il est suspendu. Ces membranes, intégrées dans des dispositifs mécaniques, peuvent être actionnés à partir de DC jusqu'à des fréquences de vibration mécaniques très élevées (GHz). En outre, le graphène est un gaz d'électrons 2D exposé pour lequel une porte électrostatique tunes considérablement la densité de porteurs de charge et ses propriétés optiques. Last but not least, il offre une architecture unique pour effectuer la fonctionnalisation physico-chimiques et obtenir des matériaux hybrides combinant les propriétés particulières des espèces chimisorbées avec ceux du graphène
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