63,962 research outputs found

    Civilize Them with Indian Boarding Schools

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    Indigenous communities continue to be pressured to conform to Anglo-American culture. Through the use of Indian boarding schools, Indigenous communities were interrupted in a myriad of detrimental ways related to their culture, especially in regard to intergenerational cultural continuance

    Planning research and educational partnerships with Indigenous communities : practice, realities and lessons

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    Increasingly planning practice and research are having to engage with Indigenous communities in Australia to empower and position their knowledge in planning strategies and arguments. But also to act as articulators of their cultural knowledge, landscape aspirations and responsibilities and the need to ensure that they are directly consulted in projects that impact upon their &lsquo;country&rsquo; generally and specifically. This need has changed rapidly over the last 25 years because of land title claim legal precedents, state and Commonwealth legislative changes, and policy shifts to address reconciliation and the consequences of the fore-going precedents and enactments. While planning instruments and their policies have shifted, as well as research grant expectations and obligations, many of these Western protocols do not recognise and sympathetically deal with the cultural and practical realities of Indigenous community management dynamics, consultation practices and procedures, and cultural events much of which are placing considerable strain upon communities who do not have the human and financial resources to manage, respond, co-operate and inform in the same manner expected of non-Indigenous communities in Australia. This paper reviews several planning formal research, contract research and educational engagements and case studies between the authors and various Indigenous communities, and highlights key issues, myths and flaws in the way Western planning and research expectations are imposed upon Indigenous communities that often thwart the quality and uncertainty of planning outcomes for which the clients, research agencies, and government entities were seeking to create.<br /

    The economic impact of the mining boom on Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians

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    This paper examines changes in Indigenous employment, income and housing costs to identify any localised ‘resource curse’ for Indigenous communities and the Australian population at large. Abstract Until the global financial crisis reduced Australian economic growth in late 2008, Indigenous employment had been increasing in both absolute and relative terms for over a decade. The effect of the international economic contraction has been mitigated by Australia’s booming mining sector, largely due to China’s growing demand for resources. Given that a substantial number of mining operations are on or near Indigenous land, the increase in mining investment may have disproportionately affected Indigenous communities. There are concerns that, in remote mining areas, the increases in housing costs generated by the mining boom mean that anyone who does not work in the mining industry, particularly those who rely on government benefits, will find it harder to afford housing. Localised inflationary tendencies can also affect people employed outside the mining sector, but one would expect that scarcity in the labour market would drive up wages in both mining and non‑mining jobs. This paper examines changes in Indigenous employment, income and housing costs to identify any localised ‘resource curse’ for Indigenous communities and the Australian population at large. The paper draws on data from recent censuses, the geographic location of mines and mining investment to identify some potentially important effects of the mining boom on Indigenous communities. The main finding is that the mining boom has improved employment and income outcomes, but increased average housing costs. While the average increase in income has generally offset the increase in costs, there is some evidence that housing stress for low-income households has increased as a result of the mining boom

    Convenio de Colaboracion entre la Secretaria de Energia y la Comision Nacional para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indigenas (2009)

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    This document announces the collaborative efforts of two governmental entities aimed at improving living conditions within indigenous communities in Mexico. A section of this document outlines the objective of implementing the use of renewable energies in said communities

    Trust Development in Research with Indigenous Communities in the United States

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    A historical backdrop of oppression and exploitation has set the stage for distrust in research relationships with many indigenous communities. Although distrust poses a barrier to conducting research with indigenous communities, it also provides a distinct opportunity to examine factors related to trust development. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to understand the factors that relate to trust development in research relationships with indigenous communities in the United States. This qualitative descriptive study explored the experiences of 13 indigenous and non-indigenous researchers working with indigenous communities. Historical oppression, risk and reputation, power balancing across multiple levels, reciprocity and benevolence, and cross-cultural collaboration were emergent themes related to trust development with indigenous communities. Activities between researchers and indigenous communities occurred within a broader context of historical oppression and were on a continuum between trust-building and trust-breaking

    The civil and family law needs of Indigenous people in Victoria

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    This report identifies the most pressing legal needs of Indigenous Victorians, which involve housing, discrimination and debt.The report presents key findings and recommendations of research conducted in 2012- 2013 by the Indigenous Legal Needs Project (ILNP) in Victoria. The ILNP is a national project. Its aims are to:identify and analyse the legal needs of Indigenous communities in non-criminal areas of law (including discrimination, housing and tenancy, child protection, employment, credit and debt, wills and estates, and consumer-related matters); and provide an understanding of how legal service delivery might work more effectively to address identified civil and family law needs of Indigenous communities. ILNP research is intended to benefit Indigenous people by improving access to civil and family law justice

    Voices From the Congo Basin: Incorporating the Perspectives of Local Stakeholders for Improved REDD Design

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    Presents the concerns of the Congo Basin's local and indigenous communities, community NGOs, and parliament members over the design and implementation of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation such as inequitable revenue distribution

    Indigenous Communities and Community Development Principles in South-East Nigeria: Challenges and Prospects

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    Indigenous communities have fallen victims of underdevelopment arising from the remote nature of their environment coupled with public/private concentration on the urban areas for meaningful infrastructural and super-structural development. This situation has deprived most of these indigenous communities in Nigeria of unleashing their potentials and maximum utilization of their human and non-human resources for socio-economic development in their environment. This paper is motivated by this scenario to look for ways of improving the course of indigenous communities through optimal use of their unharnessed potentials for socio-economic development. The paper discussed the principles of community development, its challenges and prospects for socio-economic growth and sustenance of indigenous communities in Nigeria. This will function as a catalyst for empowering indigenous communities towards socio-economic and sustainable development. Keywords: Indigenous communities, community development, principles, challenges and prospects, sustainability

    Pergeseran Persepsi terhadap Pendidikan Komunitas Adat Terpencil di Pulau Kundur Kabupaten Karimun Provinsi Kepulauan Riau

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    Education is a fundamental thing that must be owned by all levels of society in Indonesia. Equitable and affordable education should be felt by all Indonesian people, Especially for the Indigenous communities in Kundur Island Karimun Regency Riau Archipelago Province namely Duano Indigenous Community and Mantang Indigenous Community. This study aims to determine (1) the socioeconomic conditions of Remote Indigenous Community life on Kundur Island (2) shifting perceptions of Remote Indigenous Communities to education (3) the role of education in influencing the life of Remote Indigenous Communities in Kundur Island. This study uses a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods with a sociology approach and using data collection techniques in the form of observation, interviews, and questionnaires. The results of this study indicate that the desire of the parents of indigenous communities in the island of Kundur to send their children to the higher levels but still constrained by several factors that are difficult to pass. The existence of indigenous communities is reported to have existed since the 1940s and today indigenous communities have occupied their precise neighborhoods for generations. Until now, there are still many community members of indigenous communities who do not complete formal education and found many early childhood children who work to help their parents
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