152,461 research outputs found

    Developing our evidence base (information document)

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    "Purpose: “To provide high quality ,timely evidence that informs and challenges DCELLS strategies , policies and programmes”. This document outlines DCELLS' current and future analytical priorities. It reflects the fact that DCELLS’ work impacts not only upon education, learning and training within and beyond Wales, but also on many other aspects of people’s lives such as health and social care, economic prospects, engagement with society, and individual and community well-being." - page 5

    National Healthy Schools Programme: Developing the Evidence Base

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    CIVIC LIFE: Evidence Base for the Triennial Review

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    This document forms part of the Equality and Human Rights Commission triennial review and covers equalities in civic life. It examines equality in political participation, freedom of language and freedom of worship. The primary aim is to map the various dimensions of equality and inequality in participation in civic and political life. We explore and review equalities, good relations and human rights in relation to civic life, and where possible we examine some of the driving forces behind the differences that we observe

    Healthy and health promoting colleges - an evidence base

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    A report from a study which aimed to identify sources of evidence about existing initiatives which aim to promote physical and emotional health and well-being of young people (aged 14-19) within further education settings in England (or comparable college settings in other countries). Specifically, the study addressed the following questions, 1. What is known about the health-related needs, interests and concerns of young people attending colleges of further education in England? 2. What is known about current ‘healthy college’ provision to promote the health and well-being of students attending colleges of further education? 3. What are seen to be successful and promising approaches to health promotion among younger students attending colleges of further education (or comparable types of educational settings in other countries – such as community colleges)? What approaches show little or no promise? 4. What is known about whether certain types of approaches are more useful for particular groups of students (such as young men, young women or students with disabilities or learning difficulties), or for particular health issues (such as sexual health, smoking cessation or emotional well-being)? 5. Given what is known, what does this suggest for the development of programmes to promote health and well-being in further education (FE) college settings in England

    The evidence-base for stroke education in care homes

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    <b>Summary.</b> <b>Research questions:</b> 1. What are registered care home nurses’ educational priorities regarding stroke care? 2. What are senior care home assistants’ educational priorities regarding stroke care? 3. How do care home nurses conceive stroke care will be delivered in 2010? <b>Study design:</b> This was a 2-year study using focus groups, stroke guidelines, professional recommendations and stroke literature for the development of a questionnaire survey for data collection. Workshops provided study feedback to participants. Data were collected in 2005–2006. <b>Study site:</b> Greater Glasgow NHS Health Board. <b>Population and sample:</b> A stratified random selection of 16 private, 3 voluntary and 6 NHS continuing care homes from which a sample of 115 trained nurses and 19 senior care assistants was drawn. <b>Results:</b> The overall response rate for care home nurses was 64.3% and for senior care assistants, 73.6%. Both care home nurses and senior care assistants preferred accredited stroke education. Care home nurses wanted more training in stroke assessment, rehabilitation and acute interventions whereas senior care assistants wanted more in managing depression, general stroke information and communicating with dysphasic residents. Senior care assistants needed more information on multidisciplinary team working while care home nurses were more concerned with ethical decision-making, accountability and goal setting. <b>Conclusions:</b> Care home staff need and want more stroke training. They are clear that stroke education should be to the benefit of their resident population. Guidelines on stroke care should be developed for care homes and these should incorporate support for continuing professional learning in relation to the resident who has had a stroke

    Psychoanalytic and psychodynamic therapies for depression. The evidence base.

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    David Taylor, a consultant psychotherapist at the Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust (120 Belsize Lane, London NW3 5BA, UK. Email: [email protected]), is the clinical lead of the Tavistock Adult Depression Study (a randomised controlled trial of 60 sessions of weekly psychoanalytic psychotherapy v. treatment as usual for patients with chronic, refractory depression). He is a training and supervising psychoanalyst at the Institute of Psychoanalysis. This article argues that the current approach to guideline development for the treatment of depression is not supported by the evidence: clearly depression is not a disease for which treatment efficacy is best determined by short-term randomised controlled trials. As a result, important findings have been marginalised. Different principles of evidence-gathering are described. When a wider range of the available evidence is critically considered the case for dynamic approaches to the treatment of depression can be seen to be stronger than is often thought. Broadly, the benefits of short-term psychodynamic therapies are equivalent in size to the effects of antidepressants and cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT). The benefits of CBT may occur more quickly, but those of short-term psychodynamic therapies may continue to increase after treatment. There may be a ceiling on the effects of short-term treatments of whatever type. Longer-term psychodynamic treatments may improve associated social, work and personal dysfunctions as well as reductions in depressive symptoms

    One evidence base; three stories: do opioids relieve chronic breathlessness?

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    Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/. The efficacy of low-dose systemic opioids for chronic breathlessness was questioned by the recent Cochrane review by Barnes et al We examined the reasons for this conflicting finding and re-evaluated the efficacy of systemic opioids. Compared with previous meta-analyses, Barnes et al reported a smaller effect and lower precision, but did not account for matched data of crossover trials (11/12 included trials) and added a risk-of-bias criterion (sample size). When re-analysed to account for crossover data, opioids decreased breathlessness (standardised mean differences -0.32; -0.18 to -0.47; I2=44.8%) representing a clinically meaningful reduction of 0.8 points (0-10 numerical rating scale), consistent across meta-analyses

    The evidence base to guide development of Tier 4 CAMHS

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