19,466 research outputs found

    The locative dystopia

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    Locative media uses portable, networked, location aware computing devices for user-led mapping and artistic interventions in which geographical space becomes its canvas. The discourse of locative media gestures to a convergence of the digital domain and geographical space, and the course it plots towards this future demands not only that data be made geographically specific but also that the user - if not defined by their location - at least offers up their location as a condition of entering the game. In this respect, not to mention its choice of tools, locative media operates upon the same plane as military tracking, State and commercial surveillance, forcing a consideration of how locative media might challenge, or be complicit with such forms of social control

    Pintu Terlarang a Disconcerting Spatial Interpretation of Urban Dystopia

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    The main character of the film Pintu terlarang (The forbidden door), Gambir, attains success in the art world by making statues of pregnant women. Part of his creative process is to insert dead foetuses into the wombs of the statues. His troubled soul meets a written request for help by a child he encounters in various places. The journey to find the child leads him to a secret door, revealing a terrifying reality of a dehumanized world. The city, commonly characterized by a sense of vastness, is set in opposition to small, enclosed spaces where individuals converse with their utmost self. The questions explored are: What is the role of space in engendering urban dystopia? In what ways does the selection of different space settings help create a dehumanized world? I argue that urban dystopia is created when the inhabitants of a city return to enclosed spaces in an effort to find an existence. When individuals prefer enclosed spaces and fail to reconstruct existing meanings, tendencies toward dystopia will come forward and city life will degenerate

    Measurement of intangibles in current society: challenges, perspectives and choice

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    Intangible cultural value has temporal, directional, geospatial, transactional, transference & multiplier effects. Social Earnings Ratio non-financial currency is used to unravel volition in dystopia

    Fear images and the eclipse of utopia

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    Economic dystopia in Kyrgyzstan

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    Hailed as a success story for liberal market reforms, Kyrgyzstan in fact provides an example of how the rentier class have become an integral part of the economy, and how democracy has given way to plutocracy

    The algebra of happiness: Yevgeny Zamyatin’s we

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    The article was submitted on 05.06.2015.Yevgeny Zamyatin’s novel We is one of the most important “Utopian-Dystopian” novels of the first half of the 20th century and was originally considered a criticism of the Communism established in Russia after the Bolshevik Revolution, during the so-called War Communism, with the loss of revolutionary thrust and new stifling social rules. As a result, critics have seen We as a dystopian novel, in part inspired by Dostoevsky’s Poem of the Great Inquisitor. Dostoevsky’s opposition between freedom and happiness is in fact deeply reflected in the mirror of Zamyatin’s We as the happiness of the Only State, which is really what people experiment in passively obeying the often unwritten laws issued by the Great Benefactor, is opposed to the burden of choice: the same freedom which the Great Inquisitor saves mankind from with the strict allegiance to the Church laws that, while betraying the message of the Gospel, frees mankind from sin, transferring it to the Church itself. However, it is possible to find a different interpretation of the opposition happiness/freedom that hinges on the idea of beauty weaved into the fabric of Zamyatin’s novel. In Zamyatin’s novel, beauty takes on a redeeming role which, although totally unfree - like the dance the Author writes about at the beginning of the novel - is not subject to any kind of external constraints. This interpretation makes We no longer a dystopia, but a utopia of time, following the pattern about which Zamyatin had written in his essay Skythians? The model of a Scythian who rides along the steppe, who does not know where he comes from, nor where he is going to and whose happiness lies in the journey, in his horse, and in the endless steppe. The idea of beauty as an endless ride therefore transforms a dystopia into a different model in which Utopia is “here and now” forever: a Utopia of time.В статье с парадоксальным названием «Алгебра счастья: “Мы” Евгения Замятина» автор - известный итальянский славист - обращается к наиболее значительному тексту писателя. Роман Евгения Замятина «Мы», один из важнейших романов первой половины XX в., написанный в жанре антиутопии/утопии, первоначально трактовался как критика коммунизма, установившегося в России после Октябрьской революции во времена так называемого военного коммунизма, связанного с потерей революционного подъема и новым удушающим общественным порядком. Вследствие этого критики рассматривают «Мы» как роман-антиутопию, отчасти вдохновленный притчей Достоевского «Великий инквизитор». Противопоставление свободы счастью у Достоевского перекликается с представлением о счастье в Едином Государстве в произведении Замятина, с тем, что люди испытывают, безучастно повинуясь неписаным законам, принятым Благодетелем. Этому чувству противопоставлено бремя выбора - та же свобода, от которой Великий Инквизитор спасает человечество при помощи полного подчинения законам церкви, «исправившей» суть Евангелия и освободившей человечество от греха, взяв его на себя. Однако можно найти и другое толкование оппозиции счастье/свобода, которое основывается на идее красоты, вплетенной в полотно замятинского повествования. В романе Замятина красота играет роль искупительной жертвы, и, хотя она совершенно лишена свободы, она подобна танцу, который автор описывает в начале романа, и не скована никакими внешними условностями. В рамках этой трактовки «Мы» уже не антиутопия, но утопия времени, и выражает идеи, подобные тем, что звучат в статье Замятина «Скифы ли?». Образ скифа, скачущего верхом по степи, не знающего, откуда он и куда направляется, счастье которого - в самой вечной скачке, в коне, в бескрайней степи, становится для писателя знаковым. Представление о красоте как о бесконечном пути, таким образом, преобразует антиутопию в другой жанр, в котором утопия всегда трактуется «здесь и сейчас», то есть как утопия времени

    Construction of Dystopia in Black Mirror: Hated in the Nation

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    In this early emergence, dystopia is not only built by authoritarian oppression but it can be constructed by every individual in the society. This paper intended to analyze how dystopia is constructed through equal power in James Hawes’s 2016 series entitled Black Mirror, particularly in Hated in the Nation episode. A number of issues in this episode are analyzed by Foucault’s power relation theory. In order to determine whether the power network in the society creates dystopia or not, critical dystopia theory is presented by Booker (1994) and Moylan (2000). Since the main causes of dystopia in this episode are technology and social media, theory about technology progress and human regress is proposed by Jonas in Durdan (2013). The data were collected by sorting out some frames and dialogs throughout the episode. It is found that the vicious cycle of hatred is difficult to break so it creates a deteriorating society. The analysis is expected to contribute other elements in postmodern dystopia narrative.Keywords: Black Mirror, Dystopia, Mass Media, Postmodern Dystopia, Power Relation

    Angela carter’s heroes and villains: a dystopian romance

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    The present paper modestly attempts to study Angela Carter’s Heroes and Villains (1969) as a dystopian romance in apocalyptic mode .It is an attempt to present how Angela Carter critically examines Rousseau’s Utopia of Noble Savage in Heroes and Villains. Carter juxtaposed Rousseau’s concept of ‘Noble Savage’ with the Barbarian Jewel, who does not represent natural ‘goodness of man’ and ‘perfectibility’ which are the merits attributed by Rousseau to his noble savage. Carter debunks the romantic idea of a ‘Noble Savage’ as well as an idyllic picture of the countryside, outside the walls of civilization. Carter scrutinizes Rousseau’s utopian idea of Noble Savage and also shows how the western Enlightenment concept of Binarism to establish identity of the privileged group is misleading as well as responsible for mistrust and harmful conflict between communities. Angela Carter combines dystopia with subversion of the genre of romance in Heroes and Villains. It encodes ‘female values’ of love and relatedness as well as ‘male aggressiveness’ and competition. The paper concludes that Angela Carter examines Rousseau’s utopian notion of Noble Savage as well as his notion of the ideal womanhood in Heroes and Villains. She has created a kind of laboratory world in which there are only three communities, the Professors, the Barbarians and the Savages. It is in this post-apocalyptic futurist world that she examines the utopian ideas of Rousseau. She subverts the romantic notion of love, courtship and manners that categorize popular romances
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