18 research outputs found

    To Regulate or Not: Fiji’s Social Media

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    This In Brief seeks to document the proposed plans for curtailing the ‘excesses’ of social media and challenges some of the ongoing claims related to social media. Additionally, it discusses some possible policy considerations for protecting freedom of speech in social media in Fiji and the wider Pacific

    Unpacking Fiji internet law narratives: online safety or online regulation?

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    It took approximately six seconds, with 27 votes against 14 on the 16May 2018 at 5:03pm for the Fiji Parliament to pass the Online Safety Bill (Fijian Parliament, 2018b). Thereafter, the Bill came into force as the Online Safety Act, 2018 (Fijian Government, 2018), despite concerns about its impact on free speech. This commentary examines how the public was conditioned by certain prominent actors, such as the Attorney-General and Media Industry Development Authority (MIDA) chair, with support from government-aligned media. The Online Safety Bill had been touted as legislation designed to protect Fijians from harmful online activities (Doviverata, 2018; Nacei, 2018). However, the Bill’s implementation was preceded by a set of supportive media-facilitated narratives that seems almost too convenient. This commentary scrutinises the series of media facilitated narratives that justified the Online Safety Act. The discussion briefly examines the connection between the media, blogs and social media in Fiji. It then explores the media facilitated narratives to provide a brief critique of the Act as a so-called ‘Trojan Horse’ for safety while risking responsible political free speech. Finally, it seeks to answer whether it is about online ‘Safety’ alone, or ‘Regulation’ of online media

    Religion and the new media: discourses and debates in the 2018 Fiji General Election Campaign

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    This article explores discourses and debates on secularism, religion, and politics in social media in connection with the 2018 Fiji general election campaign, and in interviews with leading figures in churches and religious organisations. It discusses how people responded to these issues. It shows that there is still a pervasive lack of clarity in the Fijian population as to what the terms Christian state, secular state, secularism, and secularisation mean, how people understand, discuss, and debate them, and how this lack of clarity was used politically during the campaign

    Fiji Flag Change: Social Media Responds

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    This In Brief seeks to discuss and assess the public social media responses from the two main social media sites that were publicised by the Fijian government, for public feedback on the flag change proposal

    Political Social Media Campaigning In Fiji's 2014 Elections

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    This research explores the contemporary phenomenon of online political campaigning in the 2014 Fiji Elections. With increasing Internet and mobile penetration, Fijian citizens, especially youths, have become more Internet savvy. Fiji’s youth represents 47% of Fiji’s voting population and some argue that securing the youth vote may have held the key to winning the 2014 Fiji elections. Candidates therefore had begun employing social media to appeal to the younger demographic. This research examines this emerging new trend by analysing the Facebook pages of candidates and parties vying for a seat in Fiji’s 201

    #Feminism: digital technologies and feminist activism in Fiji

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    Social media has become a crucial feature of the Pacific islands in the twenty-first century, providing people with the means to demand greater accountability and transparency, and offering an alternative platform through which to engage in policy processes, dialogue and debate. Increasing social media access and use, has altered the existing media and communications landscape, with implications for mainstream media reporting, censorship and citizen voice. This paper explores this phenomenon through an examination of the digital activism practices of a group of women’s rights activists in Fiji. In doing so, this paper explores how social media is being used as an online platform for information dissemination and debate, as well as the implications this is having ‘offline’ as part of efforts to influence policymaking

    Digital feminism in Fiji

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    This report explores how women’s rights activists in Fiji are using digital technologies, particularly social media. The research involved 22 participants – women aged between 18 and 35. It questions some assumptions about social media’s strengths and limitations as a platform for advocacy. The research highlights social media as valuable for influencing policymaking, particularly in light of challenges to the country’s mainstream media environment

    Disaster Preparedness and the Abeyance of Agency: Christian Responses to Tropical Cyclone Winston in Fiji

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    International practices of disaster preparedness presume human agency, particularly at the household level, as an important pre-emptive response to anticipated natural hazards. Our analysis of Fijian responses to Tropical Cyclone Winston indicates that preparedness is also regarded as important by cyclone survivors but has a moral dimension that can be used to assign blame to underprepared members of the community. However, Fijian villagers’ experiences of terror and awe during Tropical Cyclone Winston also make them aware of the limits of human agency, prompting them to reflect on God’s role in the cyclone and the need for collective repentance and renewed Christian commitment. The effectiveness of disaster preparedness and climate change adaptation efforts can only be enhanced by a better understanding of the values of affected communities, including religious and spiritual values. We seek to contribute to this knowledge by showing how disaster preparedness both converges with and diverges from Fijian Christian practices

    Fiji

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    Political review of the developments in Fiji, in 2021

    The New Pacific Diplomacy and the South Pacific Tuna Treaty

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    The shift to a new Pacific diplomacy, where the Pacific’s agenda is no longer externally driven, but is to an extent led from within the Pacific, can be seen in the case of the negotiation of the South Pacific Tuna Treaty. To demonstrate this shift, this chapter will highlight the factors shaping the inception of the treaty, and those influencing the current negotiations. These include the regional agenda, the Pacific’s leveraging capability, and the influence and roles of the regional institutions. It will highlight the role of the Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) at the time the initial treaty was signed in 1987, and the role of the islands-only Parties to the Nauru Agreement (PNA) in the contemporary era. This will demonstrate how the new Pacific diplomacy has been instrumental in elevating the Pacific’s negotiating position
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