6 research outputs found

    Beyond Borders: Representations of Refugees and Place in Clarkston, Georgia

    Get PDF
    In the last thirty years, socio-political shifts within the city of Clarkston, Georgia, have led to an evolution in representations of the city and of its many refugee and immigrant populations. This dissertation examines the site-specific effects of the evolving policies and practices of refugee resettlement and integration within the city of Clarkston and the emerging immigrant gateway of the South. While the city itself has transformed, so have its representations of refugees, challenging imaginative geographies and complicating the mainstream dichotomic racial imaginative geographies and socio-political representation of the U.S. South. Using qualitative methods, I analyze materials from four years of research including city council minutes, media coverage, field visits, and interviews with key informants to examine the multiple representations of refugees and immigrants. Findings showcase the complicated nature of representations of refugees and immigrants within and around the city, as both assets and adversaries to local communities. Council members, resettlement organizations, and residents construct refugees as beneficial to the local economy and position their “diversity” as an economic advantage. Refugee reception has become increasingly institutionalized through stakeholders at the local scale, particularly through branding endeavors by the city government for economic gain and organizations with moral imperatives. In addition, council members use coded language to portray refugees as racialized victims and transgressors. Inherent in the city’s representation of refugees is a neoliberal multicultural representation of the city itself, which complicates our knowledge of the politics of scale and neoliberal multiculturalism at the local scale. Today, metro Atlanta’s vision for the region and its economic development are inclusive of the representation of immigrants, yet city policies are often created and implemented without the contribution of refugees and immigrants. To highlight the need for attention to immigrants’ voices, I draw on the lived experiences of refugees in Clarkston to demonstrate how identity and belonging are inextricably and mutually constructed through place and that place is constructed through lived experiences. This geographic research highlights the unique features of a gendered and racialized refugee community in the South and their interactions with the local state. These findings demonstrate the need to include the voices of marginalized communities within local decision-making and for more scholarly attention to the everyday experiences of refugees and immigrants

    Savannah\u27s Ethnic Irish Neighborhoods in the Nineteenth Century: A Historical Multimethod Examination

    Get PDF
    The purpose of this thesis is to identify residency patterns and neighborhoods for Savannah-Irish immigrants in the mid-nineteenth century. Using a multimethod approach, this thesis explores historical, social, and economic factors that influenced settlement patterns and cultivated the conditions for an Irish-American identity, particularly in two neighborhoods, Old Fort and Yamacraw. Guided by Yancey et al.’s (1976) emergent ethnicity theory, this study uses archival materials, as well as chi-square tests for association, and the 1860 Federal Census of Chatham County, Georgia, to geolocate Irish immigrants. With an emphasis on County Wexford, Ireland, the results suggest residency was associated with Irish county of origin and occupation; patterns of residency based on ethnicity did exist in mid-nineteenth century Savannah

    Savannah\u27s Ethnic Irish Neighborhoods in the Nineteenth Century: A Historical Multimethod Examination

    Get PDF
    The purpose of this thesis is to identify residency patterns and neighborhoods for Savannah-Irish immigrants in the mid-nineteenth century. Using a multimethod approach, this thesis explores historical, social, and economic factors that influenced settlement patterns and cultivated the conditions for an Irish-American identity, particularly in two neighborhoods, Old Fort and Yamacraw. Guided by Yancey et al.’s (1976) emergent ethnicity theory, this study uses archival materials, as well as chi-square tests for association, and the 1860 Federal Census of Chatham County, Georgia, to geolocate Irish immigrants. With an emphasis on County Wexford, Ireland, the results suggest residency was associated with Irish county of origin and occupation; patterns of residency based on ethnicity did exist in mid-nineteenth century Savannah

    To The Savannah Irish: An Ethnohistory of the Culture from 1812-1880

    Get PDF
    Between the years of 1812-1880, the Savannah Irish created and maintained an identity based on the Irish ideologies of separatism, independence, and egalitarianism. Through an analysis of Hibernian Society archival toasts and semi-structured interviews, the social, economic, and political institutions which influenced the Savannah-Irish culture emerged. While many aspects of Irish life in Savannah are left to be explored, this research serves to illuminate the creation of identity in the public space between Savannah and the Irish through social, economic, and political means

    Savannah Irish Neighborhoods in 1860

    No full text
    Using the emergent ethnicity theory (Yancey, 1976), which establishes that unique ethnic groups are created from social interactions and institutions rather than cultural heritage, this paper is a spatial analysis of Savannah\u27s ethnic Irish neighborhoods. Savannah\u27s history was shaped uniquely by Irish immigrants who were actively involved in politics, economics, and social organizations. The 1850s were the height of Irish immigration to Savannah, but it is in 1860 that an image of a vital, thriving city on the eve of the Civil War is captured. This paper serves to examine the quantitative factors of the Irish in Savannah in 1860 and describe the localized neighborhood effects. I have constructed a database utilizing the 1860 Chatham County Census and city directories to analyze career, age, sex, place of origin, and residence district. At the neighborhood level of statistical analysis, this investigation will demonstrate the spatial and cultural distribution of the Irish in Savannah. The study will investigate two historical Irish neighborhoods, Old Fort, and Yamacraw; these neighborhoods represent a juxtaposition of class and social structure. Preliminary findings suggest housing patterns demonstrate a high correlation with Irish national and county origin. Finally, this study and the use of emergent ethnicity theory may provide a model for other historical ethnic communities or present day transnational communities, such as the Syrian refugees in Europe

    A Wexford Migration to Savannah, Georgia

    No full text
    The goal of this presentation is to analyze the factors that contributed to the Irish diaspora to Savannah, Georgia. Our four-person group has distilled this larger question into three groups: identity, politics, and economics. At a micro-level, we will examine different aspects of push and pull factors: political figures, economic mobility, nationalism, and heritage. The Irish in Savannah followed a broad pattern of migration across the Atlantic. In order to address the Irish diaspora, we will use cross-cultural analysis analyze these broad patterns, and therefore explain why the Irish felt the need to abandon their homeland, even though they were adamant about keeping their culture alive in America. Several researchers have explored the Irish in Savannah (Gleeson 2001; Miller 1900; Shoemaker 1990); however, the micro-level has yet to be explored. In exploring the diaspora from both sides of the Atlantic, we have examined archive materials overseas in the National Archives of Ireland, the Wexford County Archives, the Wexford Library and the Waterford County Archives. At home, we conducted research at the Georgia Historical Society, where we examined Savannah City Directories and minute books from various Irish organizations, such as the Hibernian Society. While in the archives, we found Irish entertainment and media to be essential components of our research. For example, we read about Irish identity in Pike O’Callaghan, a play about the 1798 Rebellion. Perhaps most crucial to our research were the papers of William Graves and Sons, a County Wexford shipping firm that provided passage to a large number of the Irish who left Wexford for Savannah. At this point, our research has uncovered a wealth of detail about Irish nationalism and heritage in Savannah. Our findings point to a strong sense of Irish nationalism in Savannah, with Irish migrants bringing with them to America strong work ethic, activism, and an interest in politics back home in Ireland. Traces of Savannah’s Irish heritage can still be seen even today; for example, the town still celebrates its Irish heritage with one of the largest St. Patrick’s Day parades in the nation, and the Hibernian society continues to meet. Because of the large Irish presence in present-day Savannah, it is important that we understand the factors that contributed to Irish diaspora to Savannah, and why the Irish retained their staunch nationalism despite leaving Ireland
    corecore