8 research outputs found

    Frequency of shuttling (center-crossing).

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    <p>The effect of black, white, and transparent stimuli on shuttling is plotted in <b>panel a</b>; animals in transparent tanks shuttled less frequently than those in black or white tanks. The effect of deep and shallow stimuli on color preference is plotted in <b>panel b</b>; animals in shallow tanks shuttled less frequently than those in deep tanks.</p

    Mean distance from the walls.

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    <p>In the upper portion of <b>panel a</b> is the mean distance from the walls in the deep side of the tank, and in the lower portion of panel a is the mean distance from the walls in the shallow side of the tank. Black, white and transparent stimuli had no effect on distance from the walls. In the upper portion of <b>panel b</b> is the mean distance from the walls in the black side of the tank, and in the lower portion of panel b is the mean distance from the walls in the white side of the tank. Animals remained closer to the walls when the tank was shallow.</p

    Immobility.

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    <p>In the upper portion of <b>panel a</b> is immobility in the deep side of the tank, and in the lower portion of panel a is immobility in the shallow side. Transparent stimuli produced more immobility than black or white stimuli, all of which was in the deep side. In the upper portion of <b>panel b</b> is immobility in the black side of the tank, and in the lower portion of panel b is immobility in the white side; there was no effect of depth on immobility.</p

    Schematic representation of behavior.

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    <p>In <b>panels a–c</b> are the DP groups, and <b>panels d and e</b> are the CP groups. Circle size represents the duration of time in each side, and arrow size represents the frequency of shuttling between the two sides.</p

    Duration of zebrafish on the less-preferred side.

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    <p>The effect of black, white, and transparent stimuli on depth preference is plotted in <b>panel a</b>; animals in black tanks spent more time in the shallow side than those in transparent tanks. The effect of deep and shallow stimuli on color preference is plotted in <b>panel b</b>; there was no effect of depth on color preference.</p

    Illustration of the apparatus.

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    <p>In <b>panels a–c</b> are the configurations used for examining the effect of color (black in <b>panel a</b>, white in <b>panel b</b>, transparent in <b>panel c</b>) on depth preference. In <b>panels d and e</b> are the configurations used for examining the effect of depth (deep in <b>panel d</b>, shallow in <b>panel e</b>) on color preference. Horizontal open areas represent the plexiglas partitions, while areas filled with grey represent the gravel substrate.</p

    Behavioral and Proteomic Analysis of Stress Response in Zebrafish (<i>Danio rerio</i>)

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    The purpose of this study is to determine the behavioral and proteomic consequences of shock-induced stress in zebrafish (<i>Danio rerio</i>) as a vertebrate model. Here we describe the behavioral effects of exposure to predictable and unpredictable electric shock, together with quantitative tandem mass tag isobaric labeling workflow to detect altered protein candidates in response to shock exposure. Behavioral results demonstrate a hyperactivity response to electric shock and a suppression of activity to a stimulus predicting shock. On the basis of the quantitative changes in protein abundance following shock exposure, eight proteins were significantly up-regulated (HADHB, hspa8, hspa5, actb1, mych4, atp2a1, zgc:86709, and zgc:86725). These proteins contribute crucially in catalytic activities, stress response, cation transport, and motor activities. This behavioral proteomic driven study clearly showed that besides the rapid induction of heat shock proteins, other catalytic enzymes and cation transporters were rapidly elevated as a mechanism to counteract oxidative stress conditions resulting from elevated fear/anxiety levels

    Behavioral and Proteomic Analysis of Stress Response in Zebrafish (<i>Danio rerio</i>)

    No full text
    The purpose of this study is to determine the behavioral and proteomic consequences of shock-induced stress in zebrafish (<i>Danio rerio</i>) as a vertebrate model. Here we describe the behavioral effects of exposure to predictable and unpredictable electric shock, together with quantitative tandem mass tag isobaric labeling workflow to detect altered protein candidates in response to shock exposure. Behavioral results demonstrate a hyperactivity response to electric shock and a suppression of activity to a stimulus predicting shock. On the basis of the quantitative changes in protein abundance following shock exposure, eight proteins were significantly up-regulated (HADHB, hspa8, hspa5, actb1, mych4, atp2a1, zgc:86709, and zgc:86725). These proteins contribute crucially in catalytic activities, stress response, cation transport, and motor activities. This behavioral proteomic driven study clearly showed that besides the rapid induction of heat shock proteins, other catalytic enzymes and cation transporters were rapidly elevated as a mechanism to counteract oxidative stress conditions resulting from elevated fear/anxiety levels
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