196 research outputs found

    Ethically sensitive research with ‘children’ and ‘adults’ in custody

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    This chapter draws on data from young men interviewed on two occasions; first as ‘children’ aged 17 years within juvenile Young Offenders’ Institutions (YOIs); and then again as ‘adults’ aged 18 years within young adult/adult prisons about their experiences of transitions. Ethical reviews typically reflect age-determined constructions of child/adult status and those aged under 18 years are deemed to be more ‘vulnerable’, thus attracting more scrutiny from research ethics committees (Economic and Social Research Council [ESRC] 2020). This concern heightens the methodological difficulties of prison research, as incarceration renders children ‘doubly vulnerable’ (Jacobson and Talbot 2017). Such institutions may be obstructive and access must be obtained from a series of gatekeepers. Negotiating the balance between participants’ rights and their best interests (Heptinstall 2000, Thomas and O’Kane 1998), along with gatekeepers’ priorities can be challenging. This chapter outlines how tricky ethical tensions were balanced with participants’ best interests in line with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) (UN 1989). Despite the difficulties encountered, the researcher (JP) took the view that there would be ‘ethical implication[s] of NOT conducting the research’ (Girling 2017, p. 38). The chapter offers recommendations for how researchers might conduct ethically sensitive research with similar cohorts of young people

    The impacts of the drop in staffing provision in the transition between the youth custody estate and young adult/adult estate

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    This article offers a critical view of the differences in staffing provision between the YCE and young adult/adult estate. The data outlines the issues associated with the cliff-edge of staffing training and provision for young adults which is seemingly an accepted aspect of the young adult/adult estate. The accounts of staff and young people demonstrates how their experiences of diminished resources through to the young adult/adult estate are insufficient to provide the level of support required. It is argued that there should be greater numbers of suitably trained prison officers within institutions holding young adults to work effectively with this distinct population

    Children and young peoples’ lyrics and voices capturing their experiences within Youth Justice Services

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    The research aimed to explore young peoples’ authentic experiences of YJS during the covid-19 pandemic. By adopting the creative arts-based method of lyric writing, the research team sought to empower participants through collaboration and participation and to facilitate them leading the narrative (Deakin, Fox and Matos, 2020). This research adopted a creative arts-based method in which participants worked alongside an artist to generate lyrics that captured their experiences within YJS’. Such an approach demonstrated a commitment to participatory, child-first approaches. Two main themes were identified: identity and relationships. The young people vocalised resistance to frequent labelling and their ambitions to move away from past criminal identity and behaviour. Relationships with practitioners could be source of frustration within this but were also highlighted as valuable and supportive. As data collection was remote, owing to the covid-19 pandemic and associated lockdowns, the opportunity to develop relationships with young people within the YJS’ prior to conducting the research was restricted. This approach may have also impacted upon recruitment of participants. The sessions presented short-term interventions and whilst follow-up sessions were offered, many did not take them up. Although the research sample is small and cannot be considered representative, it allows for a valuable insight into the experiences of young people at a particularly challenging time. Upon receiving our findings and recommendations, the first YJS research site has sought to further embed a relationship-based practice model and greater creative/participatory socially prescribed psychosocial therapeutic interventions, including music groups, and spoken word artists to work with children and young people

    Developing creative methodologies: using lyric writing to capture young peoples’ experiences of the youth offending services during the COVID-19 pandemic

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    Purpose The COVID-19 lockdowns (2020–2021) disrupted all aspects of usual functioning of the criminal justice system, the outcomes and impact of which are largely still unknown. The pandemic has affected individuals across the wider society, this includes a negative impact on the social circumstances of children and young people involved within youth offending services (YOS) (Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Probation, 2020; Criminal Justice Joint Inspectorates, 2021). This population frequently represents those from marginalised circumstances and are rarely given the opportunity to participate meaningfully in the services they are involved in. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of the young people serving orders with the YOS during Covid19 lockdowns and requirements. Design/methodology/approach This paper outlines a creative methodology and method used to uncover the experiences and perceptions of young people undergoing an order within a YOS during the COVID-19 lockdowns. The arts-based approach entailed a novel and creative method using a lyric artist to engage with young people through a virtual platform, supporting them to create lyrics about their experiences of the YOS during this time. Findings The artist developed a successful rapport with young people based on familiarity with, and passion for, music. He promoted their strengths, improving their confidence which was perceived to elicit more in-depth perspectives that might not have otherwise been obtained using more traditional methods. As such, the method and methodology outlined developed the young people’s social and communicative skills whilst producing meaningful feedback that can contribute to the YOS recovery plan and thus future of the service. Practical implications This paper reports on a novel arts-based research methodology, implemented to capture meaningful data from participants during the COVID-19 pandemic. Originality/value This paper reports on a novel arts-based research methodology, implemented to capture meaningful data from participants during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Criminological Research, Policy and PracticeDeveloping creative methodologies: using lyric writing to capture young peoples’ experiences of the Youth Offending Services during the Covid19 pandemic

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    The Covid19 lockdowns (2020-2021) disrupted all aspects of usual functions of the Criminal Justice System, the outcomes and impact of which are largely still unknown. The pandemic affected individuals across the wider society, this includes the social circumstances of young people involved within Youth Offending Services (YOS) (Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Probation, 2020; Criminal Justice Joint Inspectorates, 2021). This population is frequently drawn from marginalised circumstances and rarely given the opportunity to participate meaningfully in the services they are involved in. This paper outlines a creative methodology and method used to uncover the experiences and perceptions of the young people undergoing an order within a YOS during the Covid19 lockdowns. The arts-based approach entailed a novel and creative method using an artist to engage with young people through a virtual platform, supporting them to devise lyrics which captured their perceptions and experiences of the YOS during this time. The artist developed a successful rapport with young people based on, familiarity with and passion for, music. He promoted their strength, improving their confidence which was perceived to elicit more in-depth perspectives that might not have otherwise been obtained using more traditional methods. As such, the method and methodology outlined developed the young peoples social and communicative skills whilst producing meaningful feedback that can contribute to the YOS recovery plan and thus future of the service. This paper reports on a novel arts-based research methodology, implemented to capture meaningful data from participants during the Covid19 pandemic. This paper reports on a novel arts-based research methodology, implemented to capture meaningful data from participants during the Covid19 pandemic

    YOUR MUSIC OR MINE, MISS? CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE PATHS TO INCLUSIVE MUSIC EDUCATION

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    This study examines the way in which secondary aged pupils from minority ethnic groups are currently served by the music provision offered in schools and from Music Education Hubs in England. The research considers the pupils’ experiences and perceptions, it investigates how teachers conceive and operationalise pedagogy in response to cultural diversity, and identifies the institutional cultures and practices that may impact on minority ethnic pupils’ active engagement and participation in elective music provision. The principle aims of this doctoral study are to foreground the voices of the pupils in identifying pedagogy and practice which is responsive to cultural diversity, and to make recommendations for initial teacher education and continuing professional development which advance inclusive teaching and learning in music. Employing a theoretical framework of critical race theory, interviews were undertaken with ten secondary school music teachers and four Music Education Hub leaders. Group interviews were undertaken with fourteen focus groups, comprising fifty-one pupils in total, in three case study schools in West Yorkshire. The analysis indicates that pupils valued ownership, choice and agency in their musical learning and open accessibility of resources and musical experiences. Pupils were keen to learn about the music from their cultural heritages, they articulated the potential of this as a culturally sustaining pedagogy and as a way of developing cultural understanding. At the same time, some recognised their teachers’ lack of knowledge, lack of sensitivity and their reluctance to confront difficult political histories and contexts which would lead to a greater understanding of the music. The analysis identified a lack of data to monitor the ‘reach’ of the music provision provided by the Music Education Hubs and schools, and a lack of governance, challenge and critical reflection on this issue. The analysis indicates that pupils valued ownership, choice and agency in their musical learning and open accessibility of resources and musical experiences. Pupils were keen to learn about the music from their cultural heritages, they articulated the potential of this as a culturally sustaining pedagogy and as a way of developing cultural understanding. At the same time, some recognised their teachers’ lack of knowledge, lack of sensitivity and their reluctance to confront difficult political histories and contexts which would lead to a greater understanding of the music. The analysis identified a lack of data to monitor the ‘reach’ of the music provision provided by the Music Education Hubs and schools, and a lack of governance, challenge and critical reflection on this issu
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