44 research outputs found

    Course Lecture: Beyond the article as the favorite piece of scholarly communication

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    The third of a 5-part series of lectures on scholarly communication, this lecture introduces learners to the ways in which various information architecture structures, such as indexes or natural-language-processing algorithms, impact information access and use. Activities allow students to explore and then teach each other about how the internet has changed over time and exists differently across the world, as well as how practitioners in their own discipline communicate beyond the academic article format. This lecture was designed for the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences Occupational Therapy Doctorate Program. This lecture is appropriate for adult and emerging adult learners with very little or basic understandings of scholarly communication, information architecture, the history of the internet, search engines, and databases. Learning objectives: Recognizes the cultural, historical, physical, political, social, or other context within which the information was created, and understands the impact of context on interpreting the information. (ACRL HSIG 3.2) Recognizes how scientific, medical, and OT practice information is formally and informally produced, organized, and disseminated. (ACRL HSIG 1.3) Examines and compares information and evidence from various sources in order to evaluate reliability, validity, accuracy, authority, currency, and point of view or bias. (ACRL HSIG 3.2

    Course Lecture: The Knowledge Economy

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    The first of a 5-part series of lectures on scholarly communication, this lecture introduces learners to the scholarly communications landscape by exploring its roots in historical and cultural events such as colonization and the growth of the internet. Two activities enable students to explore the legal implications of reusing various materials as well as the speakers and audiences of top journals in occupational therapy. This lecture was designed for the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences Occupational Therapy Doctorate Program. This lecture is appropriate for adult and emerging adult learners with very little or basic understandings of scholarly communication, copyright, creative commons, economic aspects of research and academia, and the globalization of scholarly communication

    A framework for anti-racist information literacy instruction: exemplar, process, and structure

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    Are instructional librarians having needed conversations with patrons about how research can perpetuate systemic discrimination and racism? A framework developed collaboratively between UND librarians and focused on exemplar, process, and structure provides a starting point. Learn how you can interrogate the conceptual processes and information architecture behind academic knowledge dissemination systems in order to foster a more anti-racist, equitable, and critical form of information literacy.https://commons.und.edu/cfl-lpp/1018/thumbnail.jp

    Identification of Cancer Related Risk and Protective Factors for American Indian Youth: A Mixed Studies Review

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    Introduction: Many causes of cancer related morbidity and mortality can be traced back to childhood behaviors. The culmination of cancer related risk and protective factors impacting the health and wellbeing of American Indian youth is unknown. The aim of this Mixed Studies Review was to identify cancer related risk and protective factors among American Indian youth. Results will be shared with Tribal communities to inform surveillance efforts. Methods: A Mixed Studies Review process was deemed most appropriate for the search process and data collection. 7 databases were included in the search along with 3 databases that were hand searched. Google Scholar and Google power searching were also conducted. Covidence was utilized for abstract and full-text review. Out of 1512 articles, 75 articles were included for review and data from each article was sorted out into the levels of the Socio Ecological Model. Results: After extracting significant cancer-related risk and protective factors from the 75 relevant articles, cancer related themes were identified at the individual, relationship (family and non family), community, institutional, and cultural levels of the socio-ecological model. It was observed that the risk and protective factor profile for substance use spanned all levels of the socio-ecological model, whereas physical health-diet indicators and sexual health indicators did not. Most articles (n = 58, 77%) focused on substance use-related risk and protective factors. Discussion: The method that was used for this study can be utilized by other professionals researching risk and protective factors impacting the health and well-being of American Indian youth for a multitude of health outcomes. Tribal communities will be able to use the results from our literature review to inform the creation of a community specific data collection tool focused on cancer related risk and protective factors. Upon completion of the overarching research, results will be shared with the community and can be used to inform ongoing surveillance efforts, influence priorities for intervention and education work, and inform the management of resources. The continuation of community informed and driven research with Tribal communities is essential to the health and well-being of Tribal Nations as community grounded research is limited

    Information literacy curriculum mapping in the health sciences

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    Instructional medical librarians are uniquely positioned in a context governed by multiple instructional frameworks emerging from librarianship and the professions with which they liaise. Yet very little literature exists on medical librarians’ use of curriculum mapping to align their instruction with these frameworks. This review illuminates the current state of curriculum mapping in medical librarianship.We searched five bibliographic databases for articles published between 2010 and August 2021 and centred on information literacy(IL)curriculum mapping within a health sciences university context. Studies were included based upon pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted using an instrument developed primarily a priori, with some codes developed emergently in response to preliminary review of the data.We included 127 studies focused on curriculum mapping, of which only 24 included structures which might be considered “curriculum maps”. Across all 127 studies included, The Association of College & Research Libraries’ Information Literacy Competency Standards for Libraries for Higher Education was the most-used ILframework, though versions of evidence-based practice were used more often, with a great deal of diversity and incomplete reporting on how these frames informed instruction of discrete concepts and skills. Within the 24 articles containing figurative curriculum maps, the same diversity of concepts and incomplete reporting was present, with librarians mapping IL frameworks to classroom activities more often than learning outcomes or competencies.Development of curricular maps aligning discrete IL concepts and skills with different disciplinary contexts is needed to provide instructors with a modular structure they might implement in their own contexts. To further the identification of best practices, future research should examine existing curricular maps made by librarian

    Feasibility of an Assessment Tool as a Data-Driven Approach to Reducing Racial Bias in Biomedical Publications.

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    The editorial independence of biomedical journals allows flexibility to meet a wide range of research interests. However, it also is a barrier for coordination between journals to solve challenging issues such as racial bias in the scientific literature. A standardized tool to screen for racial bias could prevent the publication of racially biased papers. Biomedical journals would maintain editorial autonomy while still allowing comparable data to be collected and analyzed across journals. A racially diverse research team carried out a three-phase study to generate and test a racial bias assessment tool for biomedical research. Phase 1, an in-depth, structured literature search to identify recommendations, found near complete agreement in the literature on addressing race in biomedical research. Phase 2, construction of a framework from those recommendations, provides the major innovation of this paper. The framework includes three dimensions of race: 1) context, 2) tone and terminology, and 3) analysis, which are the basis for the Race Equity Vetting Instrument for Editorial Workflow (REVIEW) tool. Phase 3, pilot testing the assessment tool, showed that the REVIEW tool was effective at flagging multiple concerns in widely criticized articles. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed REVIEW tool to reduce racial bias in research. Next steps include testing this tool on a broader sample of biomedical research to determine how the tool performs on more subtle examples of racial bias. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s10916-021-01777-w

    The Forum: Spring 2011

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    Spring 2011 journal of the Honors Program at the University of North Dakota. The issue includes stories, poems, essays and art by undergraduate students.https://commons.und.edu/und-books/1064/thumbnail.jp

    Critical Thinking in Occupational Therapy Education: A Systematic Mapping Review

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    Critical thinking is a component of occupational therapy education that is often intertwined with professional reasoning, even though it is a distinct construct. While other professions have focused on describing and studying the disciplinary-specific importance of critical thinking, the small body of literature in occupational therapy education on critical thinking has not been systematically analyzed. Therefore, a systematic mapping review was conducted to examine, describe, and map existing scholarly work about critical thinking in occupational therapy education. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were set, database searches conducted, and 63 articles identified that met criteria for full review based on their abstracts. Thirty-five articles were excluded during full review, leaving 28 articles for analysis and coding using a data extraction tool. Eleven articles (39%) had a primary focus of critical thinking, and of those 11 articles, the majority were about instructional methods. Qualitative inquiry (n = 9) was the most frequently used method to examine critical thinking among the study full sample (N = 28). Four themes emerged: 1) critical thinking is a process with varied outcomes; 2) learner aptitude is essential for developing critical thinking; 3) critical thinking can be facilitated through various methods; and 4) critical thinking underpins other important constructs in occupational therapy. Needs that were identified were that critical thinking is best intentionally threaded across a curriculum with outcomes in mind; and more studies examining critical thinking in occupational therapy education, employing diverse designs, are needed

    Mapping Review of Fieldwork Education Literature

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    Fieldwork is an integral phase of occupational therapy education, bolstered by a small but growing evidence base. A broad understanding of the state of that evidence base is necessary to inform the directions for future growth. The purpose of this work was to establish the current state of occupational therapy fieldwork literature, map that literature to recognized criteria for educational research, and identify gaps in the existing literature. Authors followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines to conduct a mapping review of articles with a primary focus on fieldwork education of occupational therapy (OT) or occupational therapy assistant (OTA) students in United States (Accreditation for Occupational Therapy Education)-based programs. Mapping criteria included level of education [OT, OTA], level of fieldwork [Level I, Level II], and categories of the AOTA Education Research Agenda - Revised (2018). Sources included four databases (Academic Search Premier, CINAHL, ERIC, PubMed) and one additional journal (Journal of Occupational Therapy Education). A total of 1,619 articles were identified, with 67 articles meeting inclusion criteria. The 67 included articles disproportionately focused on Level II OT fieldwork (53%, n=36), with sparse representation of Level I OTA fieldwork (1.5%, n=1), and addressed only two categories of the Education Research Agenda (2018; 80%, n=54). Level I fieldwork, occupational therapy assistant programs, and large swaths of the association’s Education Research Agenda (2018) were dramatically (or completely) underrepresented in fieldwork education research, suggesting important priorities for the immediate future of occupational therapy fieldwork education

    Gender-specific aspects in the clinical presentation of cardiovascular disease

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    More than a quarter of a million women die each year in the industrialized countries from cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and current projections indicate that this number will continue to rise with our ageing population. Important sex-related differences in the prevalence, presentation, management and outcomes of different CVD have discovered in the last two decades of cardiovascular research. Nevertheless, much evidence supporting contemporary recommendations for testing, prevention and treatment of CVD in women is still extrapolated from studies conducted predominantly in men. The compendium of CVD indicates that current research and strategy development must focus on gender-specific issues to address the societal burden and costs related to these incremental shifts in female gender involvement. Indeed, this significant burden of CVD in women places unique diagnostic, treatment and financial encumbrances on our society that are only further intensified by a lack of public awareness about the disease on the part of patients and clinicians alike. This societal burden of the disease is, in part, related to our poor understanding of gender-specific pathophysiologic differences in the presentation and prognosis of CVD and the paucity of diagnostic and treatment guidelines tailored to phenotypic differences in women. In this, scenario is of outmost importance to know these differences to provide the best care for female patients, because under-recognition of CVD in women may contribute to a worse clinical outcome. This review will provide a synopsis of available evidence on gender-based differences in the initial presentation, pathophysiology and clinical outcomes of women affected by CVD. © 2010 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique
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