93 research outputs found

    Kalgoorlie Alcohol Action Project: Working with a Community to Prevent Alcohol Problems

    Get PDF

    ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG USE IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE WORKPLACE

    Get PDF

    'Pick a Skipper': an evaluation of a designated driver program to prevent alcohol related injury in a regional Australian city

    Get PDF
    The 'Community Mobilization for the Prevention of Alcohol-Related Injury' (COMPARI) project undertook a designated driver intervention for young adults, known as 'Pick-a-Skipper', in the regional Western Australian city of Geraldton, which has a population of ~25 000. The first component of the program was a television advertising campaign encouraging people to 'Pick-a-Skipper' if they were going out to drink. The second component of the program comprised a promotion targeting nightclub patrons. The drivers of two or more passengers were provided with free soft drink all night by the nightclub. The 'Picka-Skipper' campaign succeeded in persuading a significant number of those young Geraldton drinkers, who were intending to drive to and from their location of drinking, to select non-drinking drivers as 'Skippers' before they began consuming alcohol. It was also found that the mass media component was much more important in the success of the program than the on-site licensed premises component; that males were significantly less likely to select a 'Skipper' and more likely to undertake high-risk-taking behaviour; that inaccurate knowledge about 'Skippers' was also associated with high-risk-taking behaviour and accurate knowledge of the 'Skipper' concept was associated with increased frequency of 'Skipper' selection; and that passengers defined as 'high-risk takers' are more likely to increase their consumption of alcohol if they have designated a driver. The study indicates that an extensive media campaign, providing positive images and utility knowledge on designating a non-drinking driver, can have a significant impact on drinking and driving behaviour in a local community

    Investigating the Stress Levels of Early Childhood, Primary and Secondary Pre-service Teachers during Teaching Practicum

    Get PDF
    This study investigated stress levels of pre-service teachers (PSTs) across three categories of teaching context: early childhood, primary and secondary. This paper focused on exploring the stressors in the completion of tasks in teaching practicum in the three categories of teaching context and an awareness of and access to support systems. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and an online questionnaire were used to measure the nature and level of stress. Significant results were found in relation to the school climate and the stress levels of PSTs across the three different teaching contexts. These findings have implications in terms of understanding different PSTsí stress levels across the three teaching contexts and ways they could be supported to reduce their stress level and achieve better study outcomes

    Comparing Stress Levels of Graduate and Undergraduate Pre-Service Teachers Following Their Teaching Practicums

    Get PDF
    In comparison to undergraduate pre-service teachers (PSTs), graduate PSTs have previously completed a three-year bachelor degree and are enrolled in initial teacher education (ITE) programs to become a teacher. Following a review of literature on teachers’ sense of stress, reflection and identity development, this study compared the stress levels and concerns of graduate PSTs with those of undergraduate PSTs. One hundred and fifty-one graduate and one hundred and fifty-nine undergraduate PSTs participated in this study. The graduate PSTs had significantly higher stress levels than undergraduate PSTs (p \u3c .01). Contributing stressors from both groups’ own demographic background and teaching practicum perspectives were investigated and compared. These findings provide an empirical basis from which to develop appropriate strategies to support both groups of PSTs to manage their stress, develop their identity and personal beliefs and increase their retention in teacher education programs

    Gender and Stress levels among Pre-Service Teachers

    Get PDF
    This study used gender-sensitive research to investigate stress levels and stressors among pre-service teachers. The differences and similarities in stress levels between male and female pre-service teachers were studied. There were five significant findings: 1) both male and female pre-service teachers had high-stress levels; 2) male pre-service teachers had higher stress levels than females; 3) male pre-service teachers\u27 stress has a strong relationship with their ages, while it was not for female pre-service teachers; 4) male pre-service teachers preferred to undertake their placement and commence their teaching career in middle or higher year level sectors, while female students preferred to teach in middle or lower year level sectors; and 5) while male and female students had similar knowledge about available support, their expectations of support were different. These findings can inform future gender-appropriate support mechanisms for pre-service teachers, leading to better retention in their studies and future career
    • …
    corecore