287 research outputs found

    Climatic Factors as Determinants of International Migration

    Get PDF
    We examine environmental factors as potential determinants of international migration. We distinguish between unexpected short-run factors, captured by natural disasters, as well as long-run climate change and climate variability. Building on a simple neo-classical model we use a panel dataset of bilateral migration flows for the period 1960-2000, the time and dyadic dimensions of which additionally allow us to control for numerous time-varying and time invariant factors. As a whole, we find little direct impact of climatic change on international migration in the medium to long run across our entire sample. Using the rate of urbanization as a proxy for internal migration we find strong evidence that natural disasters beget greater flows of migrants to urban environs.international migration, climate change, natural disasters, income maximization

    Liberalization and Stock Market Co-Movement between Emerging Economies

    Get PDF
    In this paper, we investigate the impact of trade and financial liberalization on the degree of stock market co-movement among emerging economies. Using a sample of 25 developing countries observed over 15 years, we estimate the impact of reforms which aim at opening these countries to trade and financial channels to the rest of the world. The estimation of time-varying cross-country correlations allows the econometric investigation to be performed using a panel data framework, raising hence the quality of the statistical inference. Our results offer strong support in favor of a positive impact of trade and financial liberalization reforms on the degree of cross-country stock market linkages.stock market synchronization, financial integration, trade integration, emerging markets

    Networks Effects in International Migration : Education versus Gender

    Get PDF
    This paper analyses the impact of networks on the structure of international migration flows to OECD countries. In particular, we look at whether diaspora effects are different across education levels and gender. Using new data allowing to include both dimensions, we are able to analyze the respective impact of networks on the proportion of each category of migrant. Therefore, unlike the preceding literature on macro determinants of international migration, we can identify the factors that influence the selection in terms skills and in terms of gender. We find that network effects vary by education level but not by gender.Migration,Human capital, network/diaspora externalities, Gender

    On the Robustness of Brain Gain Estimates

    Get PDF
    Recent theoretical studies suggest that migration prospects can raise the expected return to human capital and thus foster education investment at home or, in other words, induce a brain gain. In a recent paper (Beine, Docquier and Rapoport, Economic Journal, 2008) we used the Docquier and Marfouk (2006) data set on emigration rates by education level to examine the impact of brain drain migration on gross (pre-migration) human capital formation in developing countries. We found a positive effect of skilled migration prospects on human capital growth in a cross-section of 127 developing countries, with an elasticity of about 5 percent. In this paper we assess the robustness of our results to the use of alternative brain drain measures, definitions of human capital, and functional forms. We find that the results hold using the Beine et al. (2007) alternative brain drain measures controlling for whether migrants acquired their skills in the home or in the host country. We also regress other indicators of human capital investment on skilled migration rates and find a positive effect on youth literacy while the effect on school enrolment depends on the exact specification chosen.brain drain, brain gain, migration

    Diaspora effects in international migration : key questions and methodological issues

    Get PDF
    This paper reviews the existing literature on the impact of migrants networks on the patterns of international migration. It covers the theoretical channels at stake in the global effect of the networks. It identifies the key issues, namely the impact on size, selection and concentration of the migration flows. The paper also reviews the empirical hurdles that the researchers face in assessing the importance of networks. The key issues concern the choice of micro vs a macro approach, the definition of a network, the access to suitable data and the adoption of econometric methods accounting for the main features of those data. Finally, the paper reports a set of estimation outcomes reflecting the main findings of the macro approach.Population Policies,Voluntary and Involuntary Resettlement,Human Migrations&Resettlements,International Migration,Anthropology

    Trade integration and industrial specialization in Central Europe.

    Get PDF
    In this paper we study the impact of trade integration on the degree ofindustrial specialization in thirteen countries of Central and Eastern Eu-rope. The results show that trade integration leads to long-run industrialspecialization in these countries. In contrast, an earlier paper by Beine& Coulombe (2004) on industrial specialization in Canada ¯nds long rundiversi¯cation as a result of trade liberalization with the U.S. Given thatthe Central and East European countries are still in an earlier stage ofdevelopment than Canada, we interpret the di®erent results that we ob-tain as evidence that the relationship between trade liberalization andindustrial specialization is not a monotonic one, but can di®er along thedevelopment path.Trade; Integration; Studies; International; International trade; Finance;

    On the robustness of brain gain estimates

    Get PDF
    Recent theoretical studies suggest that migration prospects can raise the expected return to human capital and thus foster education investment at home or, in other words, induce a brain gain. In a recent paper (Beine, Docquier and Rapoport, Economic Journal, 2008) we used the Docquier and Marfouk (2006) data set on emigration rates by education level to examine the impact of brain drain migration on gross (pre-migration) human capital formation in developing countries. We found a positive effect of skilled migration prospects on human capital growth in a cross-section of 127 developing countries, with an elasticity of about 5 percent. In this paper we assess the robustness of our results to the use of alternative brain drain measures, definitions of human capital, and functional forms. We find that the results hold using the Beine et al. (2007) alternative brain drain measures controlling for whether migrants acquired their skills in the home or in the host country. We also regress other indicators of human capital investment on skilled migration rates and find a positive effect on youth literacy while the effect on school enrolment depends on the exact specification chosen.
    corecore