135 research outputs found

    Crypto and Blockchain Fundamentals

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    I believe blockchain will do for trusted transactions what the Internet has done for information. - Ginni Rometty, CEO of IBM Since the 1990s, we have had an Internet of Information that allows us to seamlessly share information such as documents, images, emails, and videos over the Internet. While most Internet users do not need to understand the details of the technical protocols operating underneath user-friendly software interfaces, it is helplful to understand how they work at a high-level. With the Internet of Information, copies of information are routed over the Internet. If a sender emails a friend, the sender keeps the original email, and the friend receives a copy of the email. To transact value, i.e., money, over the Internet, one cannot send a copy. Instead, after the transfer of value is complete, the sender should no longer have the money, but rather the recipient should

    Self-Sovereign Identity and Verifiable Credentials in Your Digital Wallet

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    Nine likely scenarios arising from the growing use of robots

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    The future of work is less predetermined and more nuanced than many think, write Leslie P. Willcocks and Mary C. Lacit

    Information Systems Outsoucing and Insourcing: Lessons and Experiences

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    Funny Business: Public Opinion of Outsourcing and Offshoring as Reflected in U.S. and Indian Political Cartoons

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    In this paper, we studied the public’s opinion of outsourcing and offshoring as reflected in political cartoons. Researchers in many fields have used political cartoons to track public opinion, yet we are unaware of any such research in the field of IS. We analyzed the content of 165 political cartoons from the U.S. and India that depict offshoring and outsourcing. Overall, U.S./Western political cartoons portray outsourcing and offshoring negatively, causing lost jobs for workers and poorer customer service for consumers. Indian political cartoons focus on jobs gained and the labor and infrastructure constraints caused by the rapid growth of ITO and BPO industries. We also compared the content of political cartoons to IS academic research. We found both similarities and differences. One similarity is that lower costs were found to be the most common reason depicted/cited for outsourcing/offshoring in political cartoons and IS academic research. One difference is that political cartoonists primarily empathize and thus promote the interests of the workers, direct supervisors, and customers most affected by outsourcing/offshoring whereas IS researchers primarily promote the interests of the firm. We also discuss the use of political cartoons as an effective pedagogical device in global outsourcing courses

    Businesses will increasingly use robots to deal with theexplosion of data

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    The term “Robotic Process Automation” (RPA) connotes visions of physical robots wandering around offices doing the job of humans. However, the term really means automation of service tasks. Let’s think of business processes such as transferring data from multiple input sources such as email and spreadsheets to systems of record like Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and Customer Relationship Management (CRM). Here the term RPA most commonly refers to configuring software to do the job

    Employing U.S. Military Families to Provide Business Process Outsourcing Services: A Case study of Impact Sourcing and Reshoring

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    This paper describes how a startup business process outsourcing (BPO) provider named Liberty Source helped a large U.S.-based client reshore business services from an established Indian BPO provider. Founded in 2014, Liberty Source is a for-profit firm that provides a competitive alternative to offshoring while fulfilling its social mission to launch and sustain the careers of U.S. military spouses and veterans who face various employment disadvantages. Thus, the case describes reshoring in the context of impact sourcing. It addresses key impact sourcing issues pertaining to workforce development, scalability, and impact on employees. The impact was positive: the workers found the employment and stable salary were beneficial, “the military” culture fit well with the workers, and workers received considerable flexibility and greater career options. Liberty Source was able to reduce a client’s costs after reshoring the client’s processes because Liberty Source’s U.S. site had about 20 percent fewer full time equivalents (FTEs) FTEs than the original India location and because Liberty Source received subsidies. We found evidence that the offshore BPO provider and Liberty source experienced difficulties with finding enough skilled staff for the wages offered and both firms experienced attrition problems, although attrition was greater in India

    A new approach to automating services

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    Companies are achieving productivity gains by using software robots to perform routine, rules-based service processes. If implemented well, such automation can result in high-performing human-robot teams, in which software robots and human employees complement one another

    Panel 2 Best Practices in Information Systems Sourcing

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    When Eastman Kodak announced that it was outsourcing its information systems (IS) function in 1989 to IBM, DEC and Businessland (now Entex Information Services), it created quite a stir in the IT industry. Never before had such a well known organization, where IS was considered to be a strategic asset, turned it over to third party providers. Since then, both large and small companies have found it acceptable, indeed fashionable, to transfer their IS assets, leases and staff to outsourcing vendors. Kodak appears to have legitimized outsourcing, leading to what some have called “the Kodak effect.” Senior executives at some of the most well known companies in the U.S., such as General Motors, Halliburton, Hughes Aircraft, Scott Paper, American Express, Bethlehem Steel, Continental Bank, Amtrak, Enron, National Car Rental, and Delta Airlines, have followed Kodak’s example and signed long term contracts worth hundreds of millions of dollars with outsourcing “partners.” Recently, a number of high-profile multi-billion dollar “mega-deals” have been signed by J P Morgan, Xerox, General Dynamics, and McDonnell Douglas. Nor is this trend only fashionable in the United States. Lufthansa in Germany; KF Group in Sweden; British Petroleum, Guiness, Inland Revenue and British Aerospace in the U.K.; Canada Post in Canada; Swiss Bank in Switzerland; and Lend Lease and the South Australian government in Australia have all signed significant contracts with outsourcing vendors such as IBM, EDS, CSC, SHL Systemhouse, AT&T Solutions, Andersen Consulting, and Perot Systems. Such deals signal a rise of outsourcing globally. Some outsourcing deals go so far as to involve the formation of new jointly held companies between the outsourcer and client, e.g., TransQuest (Delta Airlines and AT&T Solutions), Technology Service Solutions (Kodak and IBM), and Systor AG (Swiss Bank and Perot Systems)
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