1,098 research outputs found

    THE WAEA -- WHICH NICHE IN THE PROFESSION?

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    The Western Agricultural Economics Association has evolved though challenges that have had both regional and national dimensions. We continue to seek our niche in the profession. The challenge for both current and future leadership will be to rationalize the diversity of membership interests into a program which provides both challenge and sustenance for all member participants. The Association should give significant forethought to leading informed discussion and research on significant problems and issues of the West. We should continue to address these in our annual meetings and in our journal or alternative publications.Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession,

    THE DEREGULATION OF NEW ZEALAND AGRICULTURE: MARKET INTERVENTION (1964-84) AND FREE MARKET READJUSTMENT (1984-90)

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    The impacts of deregulation on New Zealand's agricultural sector are examined. Economic liberalization of all sectors of economic activity is the hallmark of current economic policy designs in New Zealand. This is in sharp contrast to previous policies reliant on massive government assistance to and intervention in agriculture. The study provides insights into the cumulative and distortionary extent of previous assistance policies, discusses the rationale in removing public financial assistance, and reviews the readjustment process. As a case study, New Zealand's experience reveals difficulties which may confront farmers in other economies where policy makers seek a return to free market conditions.Agricultural and Food Policy,

    Management of Multipurpose Heterogeneous Fishing Fleets Under Uncertainty

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    This paper describes an approach to modeling fisheries that can be useful in policy analysis when the population dynamics are not well known and the fleet is composed of a variety of multipurpose vessels. An empirical application of the methodology to the northern California Dungeness crab fishery is discussed. A multivariate time-series model provides the intertemporal (year-to-year) relationships for a simulation model describing both within season and year-to-year fleet behavior. Appropriate modifications of the simulation model parameters reflect alternative policy scenarios. The analysis of the simulation outcomes provide insight into fleet response to several management alternatives that have been considered for the crab fishery.Environmental Economics and Policy, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Risk and Uncertainty,

    Barnfield

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    Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog

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    We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness--mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat \LambdaCDM cosmology, we find \sigma_8(\Omega_m/0.25)^{0.41} = 0.832\pm 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness--mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find \sigma_8=0.807\pm 0.020 and \Omega_m=0.265\pm 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.Comment: comments welcom

    Use of traditional knowledge by the United States Bureau of Ocean Energy Management to support resource management

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    Professionals who collect and use traditional knowledge to support resource management decisions often are preoccupied with concerns over how and if traditional knowledge should be integrated with science. To move beyond the integration dilemma, we treat traditional knowledge and science as distinct and complementary knowledge systems. We focus on applying traditional knowledge within the decision-making process. We present succinct examples of how the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management has used traditional knowledge in decision making in the North Slope Borough, Alaska: 1) using traditional knowledge in designing, planning, and conducting scientific research; 2) applying information from both knowledge systems at the earliest opportunity in the process; 3) using traditional knowledge in environmental impacts assessment; 4) consulting with indigenous leaders at key decision points; and 5) applying traditional knowledge at a programmatic decision level. Clearly articulating, early in the process, how best to use traditional knowledge and science can allow for more complete and inclusive use of available and pertinent information

    Clinical management and research priorities for high-risk prostate cancer in the UK:meeting report of a multidisciplinary panel in conjunction with the NCRI Prostate Cancer Clinical Studies Localised Subgroup

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    The management of high-risk prostate cancer has become increasingly sophisticated, with refinements in radical therapy and the inclusion of adjuvant local and systemic therapies. Despite this, high-risk prostate cancer continues to have significant treatment failure rates, with progression to metastasis, castrate resistance and ultimately disease-specific death. In an effort to discuss the challenges in this field, the UK National Clinical Research Institute’s Prostate Cancer Clinical Studies localised subgroup convened a multidisciplinary national meeting in the autumn of 2014. The remit of the meeting was to debate and reach a consensus on the key clinical and research challenges in high-risk prostate cancer and to identify themes that the UK would be best placed to pursue to help improve outcomes. This report presents the outcome of those discussions and the key recommendations for future research in this highly heterogeneous disease entity
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