30 research outputs found

    An Interview with W.C. Jefferson (part two)

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    The second part of Jefferson’s oral history interview took place in the Reeder Media Center on October 11, 2023, and covers Jefferson’s story post-graduation. After law school, Jefferson returned with his family to Ohio where he was dean of students at his alma mater, Central State University. He then described working as a public defender in Dayton, Ohio, particularly enjoying negotiation work. In coping with PTSD, Jefferson moved to Tucson, Arizona where became a contracts administrator for Hughes Aircraft. Jefferson then described taking a new position in Saudi Arabia, where he lived and worked for five years. Wanting to return to the US, Jefferson then took a position as a negotiator before taking up teaching, later returning to Saudi Arabia for his present job representing the business interests of a member of the Saudi royal family. The interview concluded with Jefferson describing lessons he learned from the law school and the legacy of the law school today.https://scholarship.law.wm.edu/oralhist_all/1007/thumbnail.jp

    An Interview with W.C. Jefferson (part one)

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    So what it is, is that we\u27re not all born equal, but what we all should have is a chance to be the best we can be. -- Jeff Jefferson ------------------------------------ The first part of Jefferson’s oral history took place via Zoom on September 26, 2023. Jefferson started by discussing his undergraduate education at Central State in Ohio, where he participated in ROTC. Afterwards, he joined the army and completed two tours in Vietnam during the Vietnam War. He then discussed starting law school and how he balanced work and family during his 1L year. Jefferson described a meeting with then-Dean James Whyte, and the effort to recruit more Black students that resulted from it. The last bit of the interview touched on law school facilities, class and faculty, and the namesake of the Black Law Students Association (BLSA).https://scholarship.law.wm.edu/oralhist_all/1006/thumbnail.jp

    Optical symmetries and anisotropic transport in high-Tc superconductors

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    A simple symmetry analysis of in-plane and out-of-plane transport in a family of high temperature superconductors is presented. It is shown that generalized scaling relations exist between the low frequency electronic Raman response and the low frequency in-plane and out-of-plane conductivities in both the normal and superconducting states of the cuprates. Specifically, for both the normal and superconducting state, the temperature dependence of the low frequency B1gB_{1g} Raman slope scales with the cc-axis conductivity, while the B2gB_{2g} Raman slope scales with the in-plane conductivity. Comparison with experiments in the normal state of Bi-2212 and Y-123 imply that the nodal transport is largely doping independent and metallic, while transport near the BZ axes is governed by a quantum critical point near doping p0.22p\sim 0.22 holes per CuO2_{2} plaquette. Important differences for La-214 are discussed. It is also shown that the cc- axis conductivity rise for TTcT\ll T_{c} is a consequence of partial conservation of in-plane momentum for out-of-plane transport.Comment: 16 pages, 8 Figures (3 pages added, new discussion on pseudogap and charge ordering in La214

    Size Doesn't Matter: Towards a More Inclusive Philosophy of Biology

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    notes: As the primary author, O’Malley drafted the paper, and gathered and analysed data (scientific papers and talks). Conceptual analysis was conducted by both authors.publication-status: Publishedtypes: ArticlePhilosophers of biology, along with everyone else, generally perceive life to fall into two broad categories, the microbes and macrobes, and then pay most of their attention to the latter. ‘Macrobe’ is the word we propose for larger life forms, and we use it as part of an argument for microbial equality. We suggest that taking more notice of microbes – the dominant life form on the planet, both now and throughout evolutionary history – will transform some of the philosophy of biology’s standard ideas on ontology, evolution, taxonomy and biodiversity. We set out a number of recent developments in microbiology – including biofilm formation, chemotaxis, quorum sensing and gene transfer – that highlight microbial capacities for cooperation and communication and break down conventional thinking that microbes are solely or primarily single-celled organisms. These insights also bring new perspectives to the levels of selection debate, as well as to discussions of the evolution and nature of multicellularity, and to neo-Darwinian understandings of evolutionary mechanisms. We show how these revisions lead to further complications for microbial classification and the philosophies of systematics and biodiversity. Incorporating microbial insights into the philosophy of biology will challenge many of its assumptions, but also give greater scope and depth to its investigations

    Implementing core outcomes in kidney disease: report of the Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology (SONG) implementation workshop

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    There are an estimated 14,000 randomized trials published in chronic kidney disease. The most frequently reported outcomes are biochemical endpoints, rather than clinical and patient-reported outcomes including cardiovascular disease, mortality, and quality of life. While many trials have focused on optimizing kidney health, the heterogeneity and uncertain relevance of outcomes reported across trials may limit their policy and practice impact. The international Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology (SONG) Initiative was formed to identify core outcomes that are critically important to patients and health professionals, to be reported consistently across trials. We convened a SONG Implementation Workshop to discuss the implementation of core outcomes. Eighty-two patients/caregivers and health professionals participated in plenary and breakout discussions. In this report, we summarize the findings of the workshop in two main themes: socializing the concept of core outcomes, and demonstrating feasibility and usability. We outline implementation strategies and pathways to be established through partnership with stakeholders, which may bolster acceptance and reporting of core outcomes in trials, and encourage their use by end-users such as guideline producers and policymakers to help improve patient-important outcomes

    An Interview with W.C. Jefferson (part one)

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    So what it is, is that we\u27re not all born equal, but what we all should have is a chance to be the best we can be. -- Jeff Jefferson ------------------------------------ The first part of Jefferson’s oral history took place via Zoom on September 26, 2023. Jefferson started by discussing his undergraduate education at Central State in Ohio, where he participated in ROTC. Afterwards, he joined the army and completed two tours in Vietnam during the Vietnam War. He then discussed starting law school and how he balanced work and family during his 1L year. Jefferson described a meeting with then-Dean James Whyte, and the effort to recruit more Black students that resulted from it. The last bit of the interview touched on law school facilities, class and faculty, and the namesake of the Black Law Students Association (BLSA).https://scholarship.law.wm.edu/oralhist_all/1006/thumbnail.jp

    An Interview with W.C. Jefferson (part two)

    No full text
    The second part of Jefferson’s oral history interview took place in the Reeder Media Center on October 11, 2023, and covers Jefferson’s story post-graduation. After law school, Jefferson returned with his family to Ohio where he was dean of students at his alma mater, Central State University. He then described working as a public defender in Dayton, Ohio, particularly enjoying negotiation work. In coping with PTSD, Jefferson moved to Tucson, Arizona where became a contracts administrator for Hughes Aircraft. Jefferson then described taking a new position in Saudi Arabia, where he lived and worked for five years. Wanting to return to the US, Jefferson then took a position as a negotiator before taking up teaching, later returning to Saudi Arabia for his present job representing the business interests of a member of the Saudi royal family. The interview concluded with Jefferson describing lessons he learned from the law school and the legacy of the law school today.https://scholarship.law.wm.edu/oralhist_all/1007/thumbnail.jp
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