1,133 research outputs found

    Teaching Human Rights: Confronting the Contradictions

    Full text link
    Teaching human rights means taking on a series of controversies over what human rights are, how they are determined, and how they are (or are not) upheld.  The "possession paradox" is that often human rights are declared but many, or even most, people do not actually enjoy them.  In teaching human rights we must convey both the promise of human rights and the discrepancy between that promise and their fulfillment.  I review a number of controversies in the current application of human rights, many of which arise from that discrepancy.  I then suggest the use of literary works and simulation games that can sometimes convey meanings more effectively than expository material

    An American Sociologist in Iran

    Get PDF
    I was invited to a conference in Tehran on Occupy Wall Street. I was hesitant to accept because I feared that my criticisms of US policy through the lens of OWS might lend support to the oppressive Iranian regime, but I thought it might be an opportunity to express solidarity with the Iranian people against possible US or Israeli aggression. In the end I decided to go and found it an eye-opening experience. On my return I was attacked as a terrorist by apologists for Israel and censored by Tehran University because, in a paper I submitted at the conference sponsors\u27 request, I compared Occupy Wall Street to the Green Movement which had been repressed in Tehran by the Iranian government

    A Review of the Open Educational Resources (OER) Movement: Achievements, Challenges, and New Opportunities

    Get PDF
    Examines the state of the foundation's efforts to improve educational opportunities worldwide through universal access to and use of high-quality academic content

    The antibody loci of the domestic goat (Capra hircus)

    Get PDF
    The domestic goat (Capra hircus) is an important ruminant species both as a source of antibody-based reagents for research and biomedical applications and as an economically important animal for agriculture, particularly for developing nations that maintain most of the global goat population. Characterization of the loci encoding the goat immune repertoire would be highly beneficial for both vaccine and immune reagent development. However, in goat and other species whose reference genomes were generated using short-read sequencing technologies, the immune loci are poorly assembled as a result of their repetitive nature. Our recent construction of a long-read goat genome assembly (ARS1) has facilitated characterization of all three antibody loci with high confidence and comparative analysis to cattle. We observed broad similarity of goat and cattle antibody-encoding loci but with notable differences that likely influence formation of the functional antibody repertoire. The goat heavy-chain locus is restricted to only four functional and nearly identical IGHV genes, in contrast to the ten observed in cattle. Repertoire analysis indicates that light-chain usage is more balanced in goats, with greater representation of kappa light chains (~ 20-30%) compared to that in cattle (~ 5%). The present study represents the first characterization of the goat antibody loci and will help inform future investigations of their antibody responses to disease and vaccination

    Dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates with dipole-dependent scattering length

    Full text link
    We consider a Bose-Einstein condensate of polar molecules in a harmonic trap, where the effective dipole may be tuned by an external field. We demonstrate that taking into account the dependence of the scattering length on the dipole moment is essential to reproducing the correct energies and for predicting the stability of the condensate. We do this by comparing Gross-Pitaevskii calculations with diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. We find very good agreement between the results obtained by these two approaches once the dipole dependence of the scattering length is taken into account. We also examine the behavior of the condensate in non-isotropic traps

    Market Orientation Within University Schools Of Business: Can A Dynamical Systems Viewpoint Applied To A Non-Temporal Data Set Yield Valuable Insights For University Managers?

    Get PDF
    This study investigates the use of using complexity theory – the study of nonlinear dynamical systems of which chaos and catastrophe theory are subsets – in the analysis of a non temporal data set to derive valuable insights into the functioning of university schools of business. The approach is unusual in that studies of nonlinearity in complex dynamical systems typically involve longitudinal data.  Challenges associated with such studies usually involve establishing nonlinearity, obtaining a data set with a sufficient number of entries, and robust mathematical and computational requirements for effective analysis.  The format of the paper is as follows: 1) a general description of complex systems is presented which identifies a number of generally accepted characteristics of complex systems, 2) a description of the data set and the research technique utilized, 3) a presentation of the data set as an “attractor” landscape as typically defined in complex systems analysis, 4) potential insights that may be derived from the analysis; and 5) conclusions and recommendations for further study.  The value of the study is to demonstrate that within the framework of complexity theory, non longitudinal data may be used to derive valuable managerial insights into the functioning of organizations such as university schools of business

    Managing Complex Dynamical Systems

    Get PDF
    Management commonly engages in a variety of research designed to provide insight into the motivation and relationships of individuals, departments, organizations, etc. This paper demonstrates how the application of concepts associated with the analysis of complex systems applied to such data sets can yield enhanced insights for managerial action

    Penetrating ulcer of the thoracic aorta: What is it? How do we recognize it? How do we manage it?

    Get PDF
    AbstractBackground: Although classic type A and B aortic dissections have been well described, less is known about the natural history of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers of the thoracic aorta. This study differentiates penetrating ulcer from aortic dissection, determines the clinical features and natural history of these ulcers, and establishes appropriate correlates regarding optimal treatment. Methods: A retrospective review of patient records and imaging studies was conducted with 198 patients with initial diagnoses of aortic dissection (86 type A, 112 type B) at our institution from 1985 to 1997. Results: Of the 198 patients, 15 (7.6%) were found to have a penetrating aortic ulcer on re-review of computed tomographic scans, magnetic resonance images, angiograms, echocardiograms, intraoperative findings, or pathology reports. Two ulcers (13.3%) were located in the ascending aorta; the other 13 (86.7%) were in the descending aorta. In comparison with those with type A or B aortic dissection, patients with penetrating ulcer were older (mean age 76.6 years, p = 0.018); had larger aortic diameters (mean diameter 6.5 cm); had ulcers primarily in the descending aorta (13 of 15 patients, 86.7%); and more often had ulcers associated with a prior diagnosed or managed AAA (6 of 15 patients, 40.0%; p = 0.0001). Risk for aortic rupture was higher among patients with penetrating ulcers (40.0%) than patients with type A (7.0%) or type B (3.6%) aortic dissection (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: Accurate recognition and differentiation of penetrating ulcers from classic aortic dissection at initial presentation is critical for optimal treatment of these patients. For penetrating ulcer, the prognosis may be more serious than with classic type A or B aortic dissection. Surgical management is advocated for penetrating ulcers in the ascending aorta and for penetrating ulcers in the descending aorta that exhibit early clinical or radiologic signs of deterioration. (J Vasc Surg 1998;27:1006-16.

    The salt consumption of sheep: Fattening lambs

    Get PDF
    1. Common salt (sodium chloride) is one of the essential nutrients in the rations of sheep and lambs, and the proper provision of it makes for a more profitable and satisfactory sheep husbandry. 2. Free-choice salt feeding with our present knowledge appears to be the most satisfactory method of allowance under Corn-belt conditions to secure near-optimum nutritional results. 3. When salt is arbitrarily allowed, mixed with the feeds, experimental results indicate that with our present understanding of the factors controlling salt needs, it is very difficult to approximate the correct quantitative allowance. 4. Researches with wintering ewes indicate that salting the feed may be easily overdone, or underdone. An absence of salt from the feeds allowed ewes resulted in lesser gains, less efficient use of feeds, an impaired lamb crop and a decreased wool yield. The ewes not fed salt developed a marked craving for it. 5. The records kept on 1,306 winter-fed lambs show an average daily salt consumption of 0.011 pound per lamb, the range by lots being from 0.001 to 0.019 pound. It is estimated that lambs fed at Ames secure about one-half of their total sodium (pure common salt contains 39.34 percent of the mineral sodium) and three-fourths of their chlorine (salt contains 60.66 percent of chlorine) from the salt box (salt self-fed). Ames campus water supplies but very little of the total salt constituents, but the feed provides practically all the sodium and chlorine not supplied in the salt box. 6. The character and composition of the rations fed affect in large measure the salt consumption and r equirements of fattening lambs. Feeding beet molasses markedly decreased salt consumption, whereas alfalfa hay had the opposite effect. 7. Fattening lambs consume much more salt per unit weight than steers fed under similar conditions, and whereas the daily salt consumption of lambs increases during the feeding period, that of the steers decreases. Lambs in the finishing lots consume more roughage in proportion to concentrates than do steers; this ratio of roughage to concentrates is the more marked as the period of feeding progresses. The greater the proportion of roughage, the larger apparently is the salt consumption. 8. The salt required for a hundred pounds gain on 1,306 fattening lambs averaged 3.78 pounds, the range being from 0.21 to 11.18 pounds. A typical representative of an average lamb, gaining 30 pounds in our experiments, would therefore require a little over one and a tenth pounds of salt during the winter feeding period. 9. The observations and data as available and interpreted indicate that the free-choice feeding of salt of high grade, block or flake, is good practice in the fattening of lambs

    Impact of Level of Effort on the Effects of Compliance with the 3-Hour Rule

    Get PDF
    Objective To determine if patients’ level of effort (LOE) in therapy sessions during traumatic brain injury (TBI) rehabilitation modifies the effect of compliance with the 3-Hour Rule of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Design Propensity score methodology applied to the TBI-Practice-Based Evidence (TBI-PBE) database, consisting of multi-site, prospective, longitudinal observational data. Setting Acute inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRF). Participants Patients (n=1820) who received their first IRF admission for TBI in the US and were enrolled for 3 and 9 month follow-up. Main Outcome Measures Participation Assessment with Recombined Tools-Objective-17, FIMTM Motor and Cognitive scores, Satisfaction with Life Scale, and Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Results When the full cohort was examined, no strong main effect of compliance with the 3-Hour Rule was identified and LOE did not modify the effect of compliance with the 3-Hour Rule. In contrast, LOE had a strong positive main effect on all outcomes, except depression. When the sample was stratified by level of disability, LOE modified the effect of compliance, particularly on the outcomes of participants with less severe disability. For these patients, providing 3 hours of therapy for 50%+ of therapy days in the context of low effort resulted in poorer performance on select outcome measures at discharge and up to 9 months post discharge compared to patients with <50% of 3-hr therapy days. Conclusions LOE is an active ingredient in inpatient TBI rehabilitation, while compliance with the 3-Hour Rule was not found to have a substantive impact on the outcomes. The results support matching time in therapy during acute TBI rehabilitation to patients’ LOE in order to optimize long-term benefits on outcomes
    • …
    corecore