40 research outputs found

    Exploring Pre-service Teachers\u27 Knowledge of and Ability to Use Text Messaging

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    This study aimed to assess the pre-service teachers’ knowledge of and ability to use text messaging, and assist their use of this technology in the classroom teaching context. Data were gathered by means of a questionnaire and text message exercises. Fifty-three pre-service teachers participated in the study. It was found that although different tasks required different contributions of word numbers to complete the text messages, the percentages of text abbreviations were the same in all text messages. It was also found that participants who used more text abbreviations in their text messages had more correct scores in translating text abbreviations into Standard English. Moreover, participants who rated themselves higher in their self-rated writing and reading abilities used more text abbreviations in their text messages. Teacher educators may find this paper useful in understanding pre-service teachers’ knowledge and ability to use text messages, with a further view to developing professional training sessions for improving their abilities in using text messaging technologies effectively in their teaching

    Investigating the Stress Levels of Early Childhood, Primary and Secondary Pre-service Teachers during Teaching Practicum

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    This study investigated stress levels of pre-service teachers (PSTs) across three categories of teaching context: early childhood, primary and secondary. This paper focused on exploring the stressors in the completion of tasks in teaching practicum in the three categories of teaching context and an awareness of and access to support systems. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and an online questionnaire were used to measure the nature and level of stress. Significant results were found in relation to the school climate and the stress levels of PSTs across the three different teaching contexts. These findings have implications in terms of understanding different PSTsí stress levels across the three teaching contexts and ways they could be supported to reduce their stress level and achieve better study outcomes

    Comparing Stress Levels of Graduate and Undergraduate Pre-Service Teachers Following Their Teaching Practicums

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    In comparison to undergraduate pre-service teachers (PSTs), graduate PSTs have previously completed a three-year bachelor degree and are enrolled in initial teacher education (ITE) programs to become a teacher. Following a review of literature on teachers’ sense of stress, reflection and identity development, this study compared the stress levels and concerns of graduate PSTs with those of undergraduate PSTs. One hundred and fifty-one graduate and one hundred and fifty-nine undergraduate PSTs participated in this study. The graduate PSTs had significantly higher stress levels than undergraduate PSTs (p \u3c .01). Contributing stressors from both groups’ own demographic background and teaching practicum perspectives were investigated and compared. These findings provide an empirical basis from which to develop appropriate strategies to support both groups of PSTs to manage their stress, develop their identity and personal beliefs and increase their retention in teacher education programs

    Reconceptualise a dynamic framework of the learning constructs in higher education

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    This paper reconceptualised the interrelated learning constructs in higher education based on the Dynamic Systems Theory (DST). The university students' learning experience before, during and post the Emergency Online Learning (EOL) was investigated to explore the dynamic changes among the learning constructs in higher education. A case study of a Chinese university was conducted, and one hundred and ninety-three university students participated in the questionnaire. The data collected from this empirical research identify different hierarchical constructs of the conceptualised learning environment and reconceptualise the period of system reformation influenced by the EOL. The key findings include the identifications of the attractors and repellors framed by the DST and the impact on the changes in the learning constructs. The results of this paper contribute to further understanding of the university constructs' changes to better plan and support students' active learning in higher education

    Gender and Stress levels among Pre-Service Teachers

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    This study used gender-sensitive research to investigate stress levels and stressors among pre-service teachers. The differences and similarities in stress levels between male and female pre-service teachers were studied. There were five significant findings: 1) both male and female pre-service teachers had high-stress levels; 2) male pre-service teachers had higher stress levels than females; 3) male pre-service teachers\u27 stress has a strong relationship with their ages, while it was not for female pre-service teachers; 4) male pre-service teachers preferred to undertake their placement and commence their teaching career in middle or higher year level sectors, while female students preferred to teach in middle or lower year level sectors; and 5) while male and female students had similar knowledge about available support, their expectations of support were different. These findings can inform future gender-appropriate support mechanisms for pre-service teachers, leading to better retention in their studies and future career

    Reviewing progress: 7 Year Trends in Characteristics of Adults and Children Enrolled at HIV Care and Treatment Clinics in the United Republic of Tanzania.

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    To evaluate the on-going scale-up of HIV programs, we assessed trends in patient characteristics at enrolment and ART initiation over 7 years of implementation. Data were from Optimal Models, a prospective open cohort study of HIV-infected (HIV+) adults (>=15 years) and children (<15 years) enrolled from January 2005 to December 2011 at 44 HIV clinics in 3 regions of mainland Tanzania (Kagera, Kigoma, Pwani) and Zanzibar. Comparative statistics for trends in characteristics of patients enrolled in 2005--2007, 2008--2009 and 2010--2011 were examined. Overall 62,801 HIV+ patients were enrolled: 58,102(92.5%) adults, (66.5% female); 4,699(7.5%) children.Among adults, pregnant women enrolment increased: 6.8%, 2005--2007; 12.1%, 2008--2009; 17.2%, 2010--2011; as did entry into care from prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) programs: 6.6%, 2005--2007; 9.5%, 2008--2009; 12.6%, 2010--2011. WHO stage IV at enrolment declined: 27.1%, 2005--2007; 20.2%, 2008--2009; 11.1% 2010--2011. Of the 42.5% and 29.5% with CD4+ data at enrolment and ART initiation respectively, median CD4+ count increased: 210cells/muL, 2005--2007; 262cells/muL, 2008--2009; 266cells/muL 2010--2011; but median CD4+ at ART initiation did not change (148cells/muL overall). Stavudine initiation declined: 84.9%, 2005--2007; 43.1%, 2008--2009; 19.7%, 2010--2011.Among children, median age (years) at enrolment decreased from 6.1(IQR:2.7-10.0) in 2005--2007 to 4.8(IQR:1.9-8.6) in 2008--2009, and 4.1(IQR:1.5-8.1) in 2010--2011 and children <24 months increased from 18.5% to 26.1% and 31.5% respectively. Entry from PMTCT was 7.0%, 2005--2007; 10.7%, 2008--2009; 15.0%, 2010--2011. WHO stage IV at enrolment declined from 22.9%, 2005--2007, to 18.3%, 2008--2009 to 13.9%, 2010--2011. Proportion initiating stavudine was 39.8% 2005--2007; 39.5%, 2008--2009; 26.1%, 2010--2011. Median age at ART initiation also declined significantly. Over time, the proportion of pregnant women and of adults and children enrolled from PMTCT programs increased. There was a decline in adults and children with advanced HIV disease at enrolment and initiation of stavudine. Pediatric age at enrolment and ART initiation declined. Results suggest HIV program maturation from an emergency response

    Exploring Pre-service Teachers’ Knowledge of and Ability to Use Text Messaging

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    This study aimed to assess the pre-service teachers’ knowledge of and ability to use text messaging, and assist their use of this technology in the classroom teaching context. Data were gathered by means of a questionnaire and text message exercises. Fifty-three pre-service teachers participated in the study. It was found that although different tasks required different contributions of word numbers to complete the text messages, the percentages of text abbreviations were the same in all text messages. It was also found that participants who used more text abbreviations in their text messages had more correct scores in translating text abbreviations into Standard English. Moreover, participants who rated themselves higher in their self-rated writing and reading abilities used more text abbreviations in their text messages. Teacher educators may find this paper useful in understanding pre-service teachers’ knowledge and ability to use text messages, with a further view to developing professional training sessions for improving their abilities in using text messaging technologies effectively in their teaching
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