633 research outputs found

    Katie Edwards, Assistant Professor of Psychology, COLA travels to South Africa and Kenya

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    Prof. Edwards travelled to Africa to learn more about the innovative sexual violence prevention work happening across the African continent and to discuss similarities and differences in violence prevention in South Africa and the U.S

    Institutional Title IX Requirements for Researchers Conducting Human Subjects Research on Sexual Violence and other Forms of Interpersonal Violence

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    The purpose of this white paper is to provide guidance on how university and college Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) and IRB administrators can oversee, and researchers can conduct, research investigating the different aspects of Sexual Violence and other forms of Interpersonal Violence

    Now or Later?: Deciding when to Pursue a Doctorate Degree in Psychology

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    Correlates of Help-Seeking Following Stalking Victimization: A Study of College Women

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    The current study explored factors related to college women’s coping processes associated with stalking using an online survey methodology. Results (N= 305 college women reporting stalking victimization within the last three years) showed that 85% of women disclosed their stalking experiences most commonly to female friends. Additionally, women used a variety of coping mechanisms in response to their stalking victimization; although avoiding thinking about or acting on the stalking experience were the most common strategies, victims rated direct forms of coping as more effective in deterring the stalking behavior. Women’s coping responses to stalking were related to a number of personal (e.g., hypergender ideologies), relational (e.g., social support), and assault characteristic (e.g., stalking frequency, self-blame) variables. These data underscore the importance of programs and services aimed towards supporting survivors’ coping from stalking victimization

    UNH Psychologist Katie Edwards Receives Early Career Award

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    Should I Say Something? Dating and Sexual Aggression Bystander Intervention Among High School Youth

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    Using data from a sample of 218 high school youth from three high schools in New England (one rural, two urban), this brief discusses dating and sexual aggression bystander intervention among high school youth. Authors Katie Edwards, Robert Eckstein, and Kara Anne Rodenhizer-Stämpfli report that an overwhelming majority (93.6 percent) of high school students reported having the opportunity to intervene during the past year in situations of dating aggression or sexual aggression; however, in over one-third of the episodes (37.4 percent) students reported not intervening. Girls were more likely to intervene in situations of dating and sexual aggression than boys, and youth with histories of dating and sexual aggression were more likely to intervene than youth without these histories. Focus group data revealed that barriers to bystander intervention included avoidance of drama or a desire to fuel drama, social status and personal repercussions, closeness with the victim and/or perpetrator, the victim being male and the perpetrator female, the failure of the dating or sexual aggression to meet a certain threshold, the dating and sexual aggression occurring online, anticipated negative reactions from the perpetrator or victim, and an inability to relate to the situation. Given the mounting evidence that bystander education is a critical component of dat­ing and sexual aggression prevention, the authors urge policy makers and educators to enhance the presence of this type of education in high school health curricula and related course curricula

    A Program to Improve Social Reactions to Sexual and Partner Violence Disclosures Reduces Posttraumatic Stress in Subsequently Victimized Participants

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    Objective: Research consistently documents the high rates and deleterious outcomes of dating and sexual violence (DSV) among college students. Thus, there is an urgency to identify cost-effective interventions that can mitigate the negative outcomes associated with these forms of violence. The purpose of the current study was to conduct secondary analyses to assess whether a two-session, face-to-face social support intervention (i.e., Supporting Survivors and Self) would confer psychological benefits for participants who subsequently experienced DSV victimization. Method: Participants were 187 full-time undergraduate students from a university in the northeastern United States who reported at least one form of DSV in the six months following implementation of the program. Results: No intervention effect was identified for self-blame or depressive symptoms among subsequent victims. However, the intervention led to lower levels of overall posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms, including avoidance and changes in cognition and mood symptoms, for participants who experienced unwanted sexual intercourse and/or physical intimate partner violence in the treatment versus those in the control condition. Gender did not moderate intervention effects

    Teaching Therapeutic Yoga to Medical Outpatients: Practice Descriptions, Process Reflections, and Preliminary Outcomes

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    This article describes therapeutic Yoga practices designed for a medical population with mixed diagnoses and a wide range of health challenges. We present preliminary data from 54 adults who participated in Yoga classes at a community medical center serving seventeen counties in Northeast Georgia. Findings suggest that attending therapeutic group Yoga classes can improve health perceptions and mindfulness. These findings are discussed in terms of implications for clinical practice and future research. The Yoga practices are described in detail, for the benefit of teachers and researchers who wish to replicate the practices
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