130 research outputs found

    Mortality rates from leading causes of death due to infectious diseases per 100,000 people per year in northeast Thailand between 2004 and 2010.

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    <p>Mortality rate attributable to CAB was calculated as the number of CAB patients who died within 30 days of the admission per 100,000 people per year. Death due to other infectious diseases shown was defined in patients who were admitted to the study hospitals, died within 30 days of admission, and had the primary cause of death based on ICD-10 codes of HIV disease (B20–24), tuberculosis (A15–19), lower respiratory tract infection (J09–18), and diarrhea (A09), after excluding those who died within 30 days due to CAB as described above.</p

    Age- and gender- specific incidence rate of community-acquired bacteremia (CAB), northeast Thailand, 2004–2010.

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    <p>CAB was defined in patients who had pathogenic organisms isolated from blood taken in the first 2 days of admission and without a hospital stay within 30 days prior to the admission. The incidence rate of CAB was calculated as the number of CAB identified in the participating hospitals per 100,000 people per year.</p

    30-day mortality associated with community-acquired bacteremia (CAB) in northeast Thailand by age group.

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    <p>30-day mortality associated with community-acquired bacteremia (CAB) in northeast Thailand by age group.</p

    Mortality and Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) Lost in Adults 15–60 Years Old in 2002 for Three Selected Indicator Diseases, by World Bank Income Level [4]

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    <p>Mortality and Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) Lost in Adults 15–60 Years Old in 2002 for Three Selected Indicator Diseases, by World Bank Income Level [<a href="http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.0050175#pmed-0050175-b004" target="_blank">4</a>]</p

    Management and outcomes of severe dengue patients presenting with sepsis in a tropical country

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    <div><p>Background</p><p>Dengue is a common cause of infection in adults in tropical countries. Sepsis is a syndrome of systemic manifestations induced by infection of any organisms; including bacterial, fungal and viral agents. Here, we investigated the diagnosis, management and outcomes of dengue patients presenting with sepsis in a prospective study of community-acquired sepsis in Thailand.</p><p>Methods</p><p>From June to December 2015, 874 adult patients (age≥18 years) with suspected or documented community-acquired infection, with ≥3 diagnostic criteria for sepsis according to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012, and within 24 hours of admission were evaluated. Serum was stored and later tested for dengue PCR assays.</p><p>Results</p><p>A total of 126 patients had dengue PCR assays positive (2 DENV-1, 12 DENV-2, 24 DENV-3 and 88 DENV-4), and 5 of them (4%) died. We found that attending physicians suspected dengue infection on admission in 84 patients (67%), and recorded dengue infection as the final diagnosis in 96 patients (76%). Four of five fatal cases were diagnosed and treated as septic shock not due to dengue. In multivariable analysis, there was a trend showing that age≥60 years, hypoxemia and misdiagnosis of dengue by attending physicians were associated with 28-day mortality.</p><p>Conclusions</p><p>A number of adult patients who died of dengue are misdiagnosed as severe sepsis and septic shock. Diagnosis of dengue based on clinical features alone is difficult. Rapid diagnostic tests for dengue may need to be routinely used in adult patients presenting with sepsis and septic shock in tropical countries. This approach could improve diagnosis and management of those patients.</p></div

    Additional file 9: of Utility of SOFA score, management and outcomes of sepsis in Southeast Asia: a multinational multicenter prospective observational study

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    Table S8. Number of organ system failures (maximum SOFA score ≥ 3 points) up to 24 h of admission and 28-day mortality in sepsis patients. (DOCX 61 kb

    Additional file 1: of Utility of SOFA score, management and outcomes of sepsis in Southeast Asia: a multinational multicenter prospective observational study

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    Figure S1. Study sites. Red dots represent nine study areas. (1) Jakarta, (2) Yogyakarta and (3) Makassar in Indonesia; (4) Bangkok, (5) Chiang Rai and (6) Ubon Ratchathani in Thailand; and (7) Hanoi, (8) Hue and (9) Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam. (TIFF 9143 kb
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