3,160 research outputs found

    How to Build a Museum

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    Who are museums for? This question drove our research. Originally motivated by a Travel-Learning Course in Spring 2017 to Manchester, London, and Liverpool, this project seeks to explore the narratives, motivations, and cultural implications for museum exhibits. We focused particularly on art museums. Our primary inspiration was the International Museum of Slavery at the Maritime Museum (Liverpool) and the London, Sugar and Slavery exhibit at the Museum of London Docklands (London). While both historical exhibits, we wanted to examine the symbolism and motivations for creating these exhibits as a form of public history and consciousness in Britain, and apply it to an American political climate. We used our research to create an art museum titled “Culinary Routes/Migratory Routes” at the Ross Art Museum from October 25, 2018 to December 13, 2018. Our exhibit was part of the 2018 Sagan National Colloquium, “Arts and Activism,” and focused on the migration/immigration process through the context of food. We performed academic research during the Spring 2018 semester as part of an independent study, in which we studied modern aesthetic theory behind museum layout, accessibility, and narrative structure. We also contacted local galleries and researched art that would fit our theme. We then applied these theories to drafting publicity information, introductions, and captions/curriculum material for our own exhibit over the summer. During the Fall 2018 semester, we prepared tours and presentation materials for our exhibit’s launch to the Delaware and OWU community. This presentation explains our academic research, process of selecting art, and application of theory into practice on OWU’s campus. It also serves as a celebration of liberal arts principles, as our project was a collaborative effort between Dr. Nancy Comorau (English Literature), Anna L. Davies ’19 (English major), and Erin Fletcher (Director of the Ross Art Museum)

    The rat retrosplenial cortex as a link for frontal functions: a lesion analysis

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    Cohorts of rats with excitotoxic retrosplenial cortex lesions were tested on four behavioural tasks sensitive to dysfunctions in prelimbic cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, or both. In this way the study tested whether retrosplenial cortex has nonspatial functions that reflect its anatomical interactions with these frontal cortical areas. In Experiment 1, retrosplenial cortex lesions had no apparent effect on a set-shifting digging task that taxed intradimensional and extradimensional attention, as well as reversal learning. Likewise, retrosplenial cortex lesions did not impair a strategy shift task in an automated chamber, which involved switching from visual-based to response-based discriminations and, again, included a reversal (Experiment 2). Indeed, there was evidence that the retrosplenial lesions aided the initial switch to response-based selection. No lesion deficit was found on an automated cost-benefit task that pitted size of reward against effort to achieve that reward (Experiment 3). Finally, while retrosplenial cortex lesions affected matching-to-place task in a T-maze, the profile of deficits differed from that associated with prelimbic cortex damage (Experiment 4). When the task was switched to a nonmatching design, retrosplenial cortex lesions had no apparent effect on performance. The results from the four experiments show that many frontal tasks do not require the retrosplenial cortex, highlighting the specificity of their functional interactions. The results show how retrosplenial cortex lesions spare those learning tasks in which there is no mismatch between the internal and external representations used to guide behavioural choice. In addition, these experiments further highlight the importance of the retrosplenial cortex in solving tasks with a spatial component

    Non-equilibrium states of a photon cavity pumped by an atomic beam

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    We consider a beam of two-level randomly excited atoms that pass one-by-one through a one-mode cavity. We show that in the case of an ideal cavity, i.e. no leaking of photons from the cavity, the pumping by the beam leads to an unlimited increase in the photon number in the cavity. We derive an expression for the mean photon number for all times. Taking into account leaking of the cavity, we prove that the mean photon number in the cavity stabilizes in time. The limiting state of the cavity in this case exists and it is independent of the initial state. We calculate the characteristic functional of this non-quasi-free non-equilibrium state. We also calculate the energy flux in both the ideal and open cavity and the entropy production for the ideal cavity.Comment: Corrected energy production calculations and made some changes to ease the readin

    Quantitative Analysis of Survivin Protein Expression and Its Therapeutic Depletion by an Antisense Oligonucleotide in Human Lung Tumors

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    RNA-directed antisense and interference therapeutics are a promising treatment option for cancer. The demonstration of depletion of target proteins within human tumors in vivo using validated methodology will be a key to the application of this technology. Here, we present a flow cytometric-based approach to quantitatively determine protein levels in solid tumor material derived by fiber optic brushing (FOB) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Focusing upon the survivin protein, and its depletion by an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) (LY2181308), we show that we can robustly identify a subpopulation of survivin positive tumor cells in FOB samples, and, moreover, detect survivin depletion in tumor samples from a patient treated with LY2181308. Survivin depletion appears to be a result of treatment with this ASO, because a tumor treated with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy did not exhibit a decreased percentage of survivin positive cells. Our approach is likely to be broadly applicable to, and useful for, the quantification of protein levels in tumor samples obtained as part of clinical trials and studies, facilitating the proof-of-principle testing of novel targeted therapies

    Identification of a Core Amino Acid Motif within the α Subunit of GABAARs that Promotes Inhibitory Synaptogenesis and Resilience to Seizures

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    The fidelity of inhibitory neurotransmission is dependent on the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) at the appropriate synaptic sites. Synaptic GABAARs are constructed from α(1-3), β(1-3), and γ2 subunits, and neurons can target these subtypes to specific synapses. Here, we identify a 15-amino acid inhibitory synapse targeting motif (ISTM) within the α2 subunit that promotes the association between GABAARs and the inhibitory scaffold proteins collybistin and gephyrin. Using mice in which the ISTM has been introduced into the α1 subunit (Gabra1-2 mice), we show that the ISTM is critical for axo-axonic synapse formation, the efficacy of GABAergic neurotransmission, and seizure sensitivity. The Gabra1-2 mutation rescues seizure-induced lethality in Gabra2-1 mice, which lack axo-axonic synapses due to the deletion of the ISTM from the α2 subunit. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the ISTM plays a critical role in promoting inhibitory synapse formation, both in the axonic and somatodendritic compartments

    Further Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations of two Planck ERCSC clusters with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager

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    We present follow-up observations of two galaxy clusters detected blindly via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect and released in the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue. We use the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager, a dual-array 14-18 GHz radio interferometer. After radio source subtraction, we find a SZ decrement of integrated flux density -1.08+/-0.10 mJy toward PLCKESZ G121.11+57.01, and improve the position measurement of the cluster, finding the centre to be RA 12 59 36.4, Dec +60 04 46.8, to an accuracy of 20 arcseconds. The region of PLCKESZ G115.71+17.52 contains strong extended emission, so we are unable to confirm the presence of this cluster via the SZ effect.Comment: 4 tables, 3 figures, revised after referee's comments and resubmitted to MNRA

    Microwave observations of spinning dust emission in NGC6946

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    We report new cm-wave measurements at five frequencies between 15 and 18GHz of the continuum emission from the reportedly anomalous "region 4" of the nearby galaxy NGC6946. We find that the emission in this frequency range is significantly in excess of that measured at 8.5GHz, but has a spectrum from 15-18GHz consistent with optically thin free-free emission from a compact HII region. In combination with previously published data we fit four emission models containing different continuum components using the Bayesian spectrum analysis package radiospec. These fits show that, in combination with data at other frequencies, a model with a spinning dust component is slightly preferred to those that possess better-established emission mechanisms.Comment: submitted MNRA

    Assessing the Dream-Lag Effect for REM and NREM Stage 2 Dreams

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    This study investigates evidence, from dream reports, for memory consolidation during sleep. It is well-known that events andmemories from waking life can be incorporated into dreams. These incorporations can be a literal replication of what occurredin waking life, or, more often, they can be partial or indirect. Two types of temporal relationship have been found tocharacterize the time of occurrence of a daytime event and the reappearance or incorporation of its features in a dream. Thesetemporal relationships are referred to as the day-residue or immediate incorporation effect, where there is the reappearance offeatures from events occurring on the immediately preceding day, and the dream-lag effect, where there is the reappearanceof features from events occurring 5–7 days prior to the dream. Previous work on the dream-lag effect has used spontaneoushome recalled dream reports, which can be from Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (REM) and from non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep(NREM). This study addresses whether the dream-lag effect occurs only for REM sleep dreams, or for both REM and NREM stage2 (N2) dreams. 20 participants kept a daily diary for over a week before sleeping in the sleep laboratory for 2 nights. REM andN2 dreams collected in the laboratory were transcribed and each participant rated the level of correspondence between everydream report and every diary record. The dream-lag effect was found for REM but not N2 dreams. Further analysis indicatedthat this result was not due to N2 dream reports being shorter, in terms of number of words, than the REM dream reports.These results provide evidence for a 7-day sleep-dependent non-linear memory consolidation process that is specific to REMsleep, and accord with proposals for the importance of REM sleep to emotional memory consolidation

    Adolescent Experiences with Self-Asphyxial Behaviors and Problematic Drinking in Emerging Adulthood

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    Self-asphyxial behavior to achieve a euphoric high (The Choking Game; TCG), occurs most often during early adolescence. Participants in TCG often engage in other risky behaviors. This study investigated the relationship between prior experience with TCG and problematic drinking behaviors in emerging adulthood. Emerging adults, 18 to 25 years old (N = 1248), 56% female, and 78% Caucasian completed an online survey regarding knowledge of and prior engagement in TCG and current drinking behaviors. Participants who personally engaged in TCG during childhood/adolescence or were familiar with TCG reported significantly more problematic drinking behaviors during emerging adulthood. Those present when others engaged in TCG but resisted participation themselves reported significantly less current problematic drinking behaviors than those who participated, but significantly more current problematic drinking behaviors than those never present. Emerging adults with increased social familiarity with TCG during adolescence endorsed greater problematic drinking behaviors. Results suggest resistance skills may generalize across time/activities
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