7 research outputs found

    Room Temperature Metalation of 2H-TPP Monolayer on Iron and Nickel Surfaces by Picking up Substrate Metal Atoms

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    Here, it is demonstrated, using high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, that 2<i>H</i>-tetraphenyl porphyrins metalate at room temperature by incorporating a surface metal atom when a (sub)monolayer is deposited on 3d magnetic substrates, such as Fe(110) and Ni(111). The calculations demonstrate that the redox metalation reaction would be exothermic when occurring on a Ni(111) substrate with an energy gain of 0.89 eV upon embedding a Ni adatom in the macrocycle. This is a novel way to form, <i>via</i> chemical modification and supramolecular engineering, 3d-metal–organic networks on magnetic substrates with an intimate bond between the macrocycle molecular metal ion and the substrate atoms. The achievement of a complete metalation by Fe and Ni can be regarded as a test case for successful preparation of spintronic devices by means of molecular-based magnets and inorganic magnetic substrates

    <i>In Situ</i> Observations of the Atomistic Mechanisms of Ni Catalyzed Low Temperature Graphene Growth

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    The key atomistic mechanisms of graphene formation on Ni for technologically relevant hydrocarbon exposures below 600 °C are directly revealed <i>via</i> complementary <i>in situ</i> scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For clean Ni(111) below 500 °C, two different surface carbide (Ni<sub>2</sub>C) conversion mechanisms are dominant which both yield epitaxial graphene, whereas above 500 °C, graphene predominantly grows directly on Ni(111) <i>via</i> replacement mechanisms leading to embedded epitaxial and/or rotated graphene domains. Upon cooling, additional carbon structures form exclusively underneath rotated graphene domains. The dominant graphene growth mechanism also critically depends on the near-surface carbon concentration and hence is intimately linked to the full history of the catalyst and all possible sources of contamination. The detailed XPS fingerprinting of these processes allows a direct link to high pressure XPS measurements of a wide range of growth conditions, including polycrystalline Ni catalysts and recipes commonly used in industrial reactors for graphene and carbon nanotube CVD. This enables an unambiguous and consistent interpretation of prior literature and an assessment of how the quality/structure of as-grown carbon nanostructures relates to the growth modes

    <i>In Situ</i> Observations of the Atomistic Mechanisms of Ni Catalyzed Low Temperature Graphene Growth

    No full text
    The key atomistic mechanisms of graphene formation on Ni for technologically relevant hydrocarbon exposures below 600 °C are directly revealed <i>via</i> complementary <i>in situ</i> scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For clean Ni(111) below 500 °C, two different surface carbide (Ni<sub>2</sub>C) conversion mechanisms are dominant which both yield epitaxial graphene, whereas above 500 °C, graphene predominantly grows directly on Ni(111) <i>via</i> replacement mechanisms leading to embedded epitaxial and/or rotated graphene domains. Upon cooling, additional carbon structures form exclusively underneath rotated graphene domains. The dominant graphene growth mechanism also critically depends on the near-surface carbon concentration and hence is intimately linked to the full history of the catalyst and all possible sources of contamination. The detailed XPS fingerprinting of these processes allows a direct link to high pressure XPS measurements of a wide range of growth conditions, including polycrystalline Ni catalysts and recipes commonly used in industrial reactors for graphene and carbon nanotube CVD. This enables an unambiguous and consistent interpretation of prior literature and an assessment of how the quality/structure of as-grown carbon nanostructures relates to the growth modes

    <i>In Situ</i> Observations of the Atomistic Mechanisms of Ni Catalyzed Low Temperature Graphene Growth

    No full text
    The key atomistic mechanisms of graphene formation on Ni for technologically relevant hydrocarbon exposures below 600 °C are directly revealed <i>via</i> complementary <i>in situ</i> scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For clean Ni(111) below 500 °C, two different surface carbide (Ni<sub>2</sub>C) conversion mechanisms are dominant which both yield epitaxial graphene, whereas above 500 °C, graphene predominantly grows directly on Ni(111) <i>via</i> replacement mechanisms leading to embedded epitaxial and/or rotated graphene domains. Upon cooling, additional carbon structures form exclusively underneath rotated graphene domains. The dominant graphene growth mechanism also critically depends on the near-surface carbon concentration and hence is intimately linked to the full history of the catalyst and all possible sources of contamination. The detailed XPS fingerprinting of these processes allows a direct link to high pressure XPS measurements of a wide range of growth conditions, including polycrystalline Ni catalysts and recipes commonly used in industrial reactors for graphene and carbon nanotube CVD. This enables an unambiguous and consistent interpretation of prior literature and an assessment of how the quality/structure of as-grown carbon nanostructures relates to the growth modes

    Chemistry of the Methylamine Termination at a Gold Surface: From Autorecognition to Condensation

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    13The self-assembly of the naphthylmethylamine molecules (NMA) on the Au(111) surface is investigated by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Three well-defined phases are observed upon different thermal treatments at the monolayer stage. The role played by the methylamine termination is evidenced in both the molecule–molecule and molecule–substrate interactions. The autorecognition process of the amino groups is identified as the driving factor for the formation of a complex hydrogen bonding scheme in small molecular clusters, possibly acting also as a precursor of a denitrogenation condensation process induced by thermal annealing.reservedmixedDri, Carlo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Balducci, Gabriele; Furlan, Sara; Stener, Mauro; Feng, Zhijing; Comelli, Giovanni; Castellarin-Cudia, Carla; Cvetko, Dean; Kladnik, Gregor; Verdini, Alberto; Floreano, Luca; Cossaro, AlbanoDri, Carlo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Balducci, Gabriele; Furlan, Sara; Stener, Mauro; Feng, Zhijing; Comelli, Giovanni; Castellarin Cudia, Carla; Cvetko, Dean; Kladnik, Gregor; Verdini, Alberto; Floreano, Luca; Cossaro, Alban

    <i>In Situ</i> Observations of the Atomistic Mechanisms of Ni Catalyzed Low Temperature Graphene Growth

    No full text
    The key atomistic mechanisms of graphene formation on Ni for technologically relevant hydrocarbon exposures below 600 °C are directly revealed <i>via</i> complementary <i>in situ</i> scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For clean Ni(111) below 500 °C, two different surface carbide (Ni<sub>2</sub>C) conversion mechanisms are dominant which both yield epitaxial graphene, whereas above 500 °C, graphene predominantly grows directly on Ni(111) <i>via</i> replacement mechanisms leading to embedded epitaxial and/or rotated graphene domains. Upon cooling, additional carbon structures form exclusively underneath rotated graphene domains. The dominant graphene growth mechanism also critically depends on the near-surface carbon concentration and hence is intimately linked to the full history of the catalyst and all possible sources of contamination. The detailed XPS fingerprinting of these processes allows a direct link to high pressure XPS measurements of a wide range of growth conditions, including polycrystalline Ni catalysts and recipes commonly used in industrial reactors for graphene and carbon nanotube CVD. This enables an unambiguous and consistent interpretation of prior literature and an assessment of how the quality/structure of as-grown carbon nanostructures relates to the growth modes

    Chemical Bonds and Charge-Transfer Dynamics of a Dye–Hierarchical-TiO<sub>2</sub> Hybrid Interface

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    The adsorption of Zn-tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) on nanoporous hierarchically organized anatase TiO<sub>2</sub> structures and the properties of the corresponding hybrid interface were studied by synchrotron radiation experiments. The molecular structure, electronic properties, and bonding with nanostructured TiO<sub>2</sub> surfaces were analyzed by photoemission (XPS and UPS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The charge transfer at the interface was investigated by means of valence band resonant photoemission experiments (ResPES) at the C K-edge. We show that the charge-transfer dynamics between the photoexcited ZnTPP and TiO<sub>2</sub> is strongly influenced by the presence of defects on the TiO<sub>2</sub> surface. On a stoichiometric anatase nanostructure, ZnTPP bonding occurs primarily via carbon atoms belonging to the molecular phenyl rings, and this creates a preferential channel for the charge transfer. This phenomenon is reduced in the case of defective TiO<sub>2</sub> surface, where ZnTPP interacts mainly through the molecule macrocycle. Our results represent a surface science study of the dye molecule behavior on a nanoporous TiO<sub>2</sub> photoanode relevant to dye-sensitized or hybrid solar cell applications, and they show the importance of the surface oxidation state for the charge-transfer process
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