63 research outputs found

    SPATIAL INTEGRATION ON THE HUNGARIAN MILK MARKET

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    The geographical separation of markets is of a special importance in agriculture, as often, agricultural products are bulky and/or perishable, and the place of consumption may be different from that of production, implying possibly expensive transport costs (SEXTON ET AL., 1991). The imperfectly integrated markets may send wrong price information signals to producers and other actors of the marketing chain, resulting incorrect production and marketing decisions. The aim of the article is to map the horizontal integration on the milk market in the Hungarian milk market using up-to-date Vector Error Correction (VECM) and Threshold Error Correction (TEVCM) methods.horizontal integration, transition economy, threshold cointegration, Livestock Production/Industries, Marketing,

    Marketing and pricing dynamics in the presence of structural breaks - the Hungarian pork market

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    The study of marketing margins and price transmission on various commodity markets has been a popular research topic of the past decades (see MEYER, VON CRAMONTAUBADEL, 2004, for a recent survey), however with a few exceptions these studies focused on developed economies. In this paper we examine the above phenomena on the: Hungarian pork market. The Johansen (maximum likelihood) or Engle and Granger (two step) cointegration tests do not reject the no-cointegration null hypothesis between the Hungarian pork producer and retail price series. Therefore we apply the Gregory and Hansen procedure with recursively estimated breakpoints and ADF statistics, and found that the prices are cointegrated with a structural break occurring in April 1996. Exogeneity tests reveal the causality running from producer to retail prices both on long and short run. Homogeneity tests are rejected, suggesting a mark-up pricing strategy. Price transmission modelling suggests that, price transmission on the Hungarian pork meat market is symmetric on the long, but asymmetric on the short-run, i.e. processors, wholesalers or retailers might take temporary advantage should price changes occur.price transmission, marketing margin, pricing, structural breaks, Hungarian pork market, Demand and Price Analysis, Marketing,

    Survival and Growth of Family Farms in a Transition Country – The Hungarian Case

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    The paper investigates the validity of Gibrat’s Law in Hungarian agriculture. We use FADN data between 2001 and 2007 and employ quantile regression techniques to test the validity of Gibrat’s Law across quantiles. The Law is strongly rejected for all quantiles, providing strong evidence that smaller farms tend to grow faster than larger ones. We provide a number of socio-economic factors that can explain farm growth. Of these we found that total subsidies received by farm and far operator’s age are the most significant factors.Gibrat’s Law, family farm, quantile regression, transition agriculture, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Consumer/Household Economics, P32, Q12, Q19,

    Price transmission on the Hungarian milk market

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    There has been little systematic analysis of the extent to which organic farming policies have influenced growth in the organic sector. Analyses of organic farming policy instruments, for the most part, provide extensive and detailed reviews of instruments applied either in a single country or across countries. Hence, there is a great need to examine systematically whether there is a relationship between the introduction of organic farming policies and the growth of the organic food sector, and whether particular designs of organic farming policies are more effective than others. In this paper, we take the first step in the endeavour of analysing the effects of organic farming by undertaking an econometric analysis of the relationship between organic farming policies in Denmark and the UK and their effects on the number of farmers and growers converting to organic production.Price transmission, Gregory-Hansen cointegration, Hungarian milk market, Demand and Price Analysis, Livestock Production/Industries,

    SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS AND THE STRUCTURAL CHANGE OF DIETARY INTAKE IN HUNGARY: A PANNEL STUDY

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    Typically, big changes in the economic system lead to alterations on the disposable income of families and thus on their spending for different type of products, including food. These may imply, in the long run, a structural modification of the quality of diet of the population. After the fall of the socialist system, in the past two decades Central and Eastern European countries, including Hungary, went through a profound, and sometimes difficult transition of their political and economic systems, shifting from a centralized planned economy to an open market economy, and more importantly, the European Union integration. Economic change in lower-income and transitional economies of the world appears to coincide with increasing rapid social change. With respect to nutrition there is evidence that those countries are changing their diets and that these changes seem to be happening at a faster pace than ever before. In this paper we analyze the evolution of Hungarian dietary patterns based on socio-economic status (SES) data between 1993 and 2007. Data allows to define and profile several clusters based on aggregated consumption data, than to inspect the influence of SES variables using OLS and multinominal logit estimations.Transition economy, food consumption patterns, cluster analysis, logit analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty, Health Economics and Policy,

    Monetary Impacts and Overshooting of Agricultural Prices in a Transition Economy: The Case of Slovenia

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    The paper focus on the time adjustment paths of the exchange rate and agricultural producer and industrial prices in response to unanticipated monetary shocks following model developed by Saghaian et al. (2002). We employ Johansen's cointegration test along with a vector error correction model to investigate whether agricultural producer prices overshoot in a transition economy. Results indicate that agricultural prices adjust faster than industrial prices to innovations in the money supply, affecting relative prices in the short run, but strict long-run money neutrality does not hold. The impulse response analysis shows that an exogenous shock to the money supply has a significant and volatile effect on the three price variables. Initially, both the agricultural producer prices and industrial prices undershoot their long-run path. Industrial prices recover in the fourth, agricultural producer prices in sixth month. The extent of overshooting in agricultural prices is twice as large as for exchange rates or industrial prices. This indicates that in the case of monetary shocks the sectors associated with flexible changes bear the burden of adjustment vis-à-vis the sectors with sticky changes. The exchange rate pass-through on agricultural producer prices revealed by the forecast error variance analysis indicates the relatively greater importance of the exchange rate than the money supply in explaining the expected variation of the agricultural producer price. This is consistent with floating exchange rate policy, while agricultural trade policy for sensitive products has been more restricted until Slovenia joined the European Union.agricultural prices, exchange rates, monetary shocks, overshooting, transition economy, Financial Economics, C32, E51, P22, Q11,

    The impact of non-farm income on the investment in agriculture: evidence from Hungary and Slovenia

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    The article investigates the impact of non-farm income on the investment for Hungarian and Slovenian farms using FADN panel data for the years 2004-2008 and different econometric estimation approaches. We find that non-farm income is more important for Slovenian farms than for Hungarian farms. Farm gross investment is positively associated with real sales growth and cash flow implying the absence of soft budget constraint. Gross farm investment is negatively associated with non-farm income, but positively associated with investment subsidies. Specific results by country are found depending on growing vs. declining real sales and on farm indebtedness.non-farm income, farm investment, soft budget constraint, panel data analysis, Community/Rural/Urban Development, D81, D92, O12, Q12, C23,

    The Choice of Marketing Cooperative in a Transition Agriculture

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    The agriculture in transition countries can be described by considerable uncertainties. In these countries public institutions are ineffective in ensuring contract enforcement. The absence of enforceable contract to set up any kind of vertical co-ordination has become difficult. In addition, this creates severe barriers for price discovery involving high transaction costs to co-ordinate market exchanges. Although there is a wealth of literature on marketing cooperative, but research on their role in transition agriculture is scarce. This paper tries to contribute to this gap. In this paper we have analysed the potential benefits and costs of the marketing cooperatives in Hungary employing transaction cost economics framework. The results presented add to a small literature on the marketing cooperatives in transition agriculture. We found that the quantity, the existence of contract, flexibility and trust are the most important factor for farmers to selling their product via cooperative. The cluster analysis provides some additional insights regarding farmers' choices. Namely, direct benefits including price, input finance extension services and speed of payments from cooperative membership have also important role. The most striking result is that the diversification and reputation has positive influences on the share of cooperative. Furthermore, large farmers have less willingness to sell their product to the cooperative. Surprisingly, asset specificity has rather negative effects on the share of cooperative.Agribusiness,

    Farm growth in Hungary, Slovenia and France

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    The article investigates the validity of Gibrat’s Law for French, Hungarian and Slovenian farms with FADN data and Heckman selection models, quantiles regressions and panel unit root tests. The contribution to the literature is threefold. First, we compare farm growth in countries with rather different farm structures. Second, we apply two different testing techniques. Finally, we focus on specialised crop and dairy farms rather than all farms, avoiding biases due to heterogeneous structures across the agricultural sector. Results reject the Gibrat’s Law for crop farms in France (except for one sub-period) and Hungary but confirm it for French and Slovenian dairy farms.farm growth, Gibrat's Law, panel unit root, quintile regression, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management,
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