2 research outputs found

    Table_1_Transcriptomic analysis reveals the potential crosstalk genes and immune relationship between IgA nephropathy and periodontitis.docx

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    BackgroundIt is well known that periodontitis has an important impact on systemic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate potential crosstalk genes, pathways and immune cells between periodontitis and IgA nephropathy (IgAN).MethodsWe downloaded periodontitis and IgAN data from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Differential expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) were used to identify shared genes. Then, Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed on the shared genes. Hub genes were further screened using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression, and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn according to the screening results. Finally, single-sample GSEA (ssGSEA) was used to analyze the infiltration level of 28 immune cells in the expression profile and its relationship with shared hub genes.ResultsBy taking the intersection of WGCNA important module genes and DEGs, we found that the SPAG4, CCDC69, KRT10, CXCL12, HPGD, CLDN20 and CCL187 genes were the most important cross-talk genes between periodontitis and IgAN. GO analysis showed that the shard genes were most significantly enriched in kinase regulator activity. The LASSO analysis results showed that two overlapping genes (CCDC69 and CXCL12) were the optimal shared diagnostic biomarkers for periodontitis and IgAN. The immune infiltration results revealed that T cells and B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and IgAN.ConclusionThis study is the first to use bioinformatics tools to explore the close genetic relationship between periodontitis and IgAN. The SPAG4, CCDC69, KRT10, CXCL12, HPGD, CLDN20 and CCL187 genes were the most important cross-talk genes between periodontitis and IgAN. T-cell and B-cell-driven immune responses may play an important role in the association between periodontitis and IgAN.</p

    Cytidine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides in combination with CD40 ligand decrease periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss in a TLR9-independent manner

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    <div><p>Abstract Local administration of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), agonist cytidine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODNs), and CD40 ligand (CD40L) can decrease ligature-induced periodontal inflammation and bone loss in wild type (WT) mouse. Objective: This study aimed to explore whether such effect is dependent on TLR9 signaling. Material and Methods: Purified spleen B cells isolated from WT C57BL/6J mice and TLR9 knockout (KO) mice were cultured for 48 hours under the following conditions: CD40L, CpG+CD40L, CpG at low, medium and high doses. We determined B cell numbers using a hemocytometer at 24 h and 48 h. Percentages of CD1dhiCD5+ B cells were detected by flow cytometry. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA expression and protein secretion were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and by ELISA, respectively. The silk ligature was tied around the maxillary second molars for 14 days, during which the CpG+CD40L mixture or PBS was injected into palatal gingiva on days 3, 6, and 9. Results: For both WT and TLR9 KO mice, CpG significantly induced B cell proliferation, increased IL-10 mRNA expression and protein secretion of IL-10 but reduced CD1dhiCD5+ B cells population; local injection of CpG+CD40L mixture significantly decreased alveolar bone loss and the number of TRAP-positive cells adjacent to the alveolar bone surface, and significantly increased the gingival mRNA expression of IL-10 and decreased RANKL and IFN-γ mRNA expression. Conclusions: These results indicated that CpG plus CD40L decreased periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss in a TLR9-independent manner in ligature-induced experimental periodontitis.</p></div
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