5 research outputs found

    Reviving Informed Consent: Using Risk Perception in Clinical Trials

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    The current doctrine of informed consent falls far short of its potential to serve as a valuable safeguard for human research subjects. Instead of providing a channel of communication between physician and subject, informed consent is a lifeless entity responsible for a large portion of the misunderstanding existing between these parties. Acknowledging risk perception principles may help transform the informed consent process into an effective communication of health risks

    Regulating Functional Foods: Pre- and Post-Market Strategy

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    As best we understand the government, its first argument runs along the following lines: that health claims lacking significant scientific agreement are inherently misleading because they have such an awesome impact on consumers as to make it virtually impossible for them to exercise any judgment at the point of sale. It would be as if the consumers were asked to buy something while hypnotized, and therefore they are bound to be misled. We think this contention is almost frivolous

    Appropriate Aims: Setting Boundaries for Reprogenetic Technology

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    Not too long ago, ten fingers and ten toes defined a successful birth. Not too far from now, ten fingers and ten toes will be just the beginning. Parents always hope for a healthy baby, and medical advances continue to help secure the fulfillment of this hope. But reprogenetics, a new combination of technology and science that allows us to choose the genes, and thus the traits, of the children we create, is raising new questions about what it means to have a healthy baby

    Facilitating Access of Aids Drugs While Maintaining Strong Patent Protection

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    The AIDS pandemic has thrust the subject of patent protection into the spotlight, a spotlight that has attracted the attention of broad audience including interested parties from the political, legal, and medical communities. Can the United States\u27 scheme of strong patent protection for pharmaceutical products withstand the increased attention

    Regulating Functional Foods: Pre- and Post-Market Strategy

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    As best we understand the government, its first argument runs along the following lines: that health claims lacking significant scientific agreement are inherently misleading because they have such an awesome impact on consumers as to make it virtually impossible for them to exercise any judgment at the point of sale. It would be as if the consumers were asked to buy something while hypnotized, and therefore they are bound to be misled. We think this contention is almost frivolous
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