566 research outputs found

    Learning joint feature adaptation for zero-shot recognition

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    Zero-shot recognition (ZSR) aims to recognize target-domain data instances of unseen classes based on the models learned from associated pairs of seen-class source and target domain data. One of the key challenges in ZSR is the relative scarcity of source-domain features (e.g. one feature vector per class), which do not fully account for wide variability in target-domain instances. In this paper we propose a novel framework of learning data-dependent feature transforms for scoring similarity between an arbitrary pair of source and target data instances to account for the wide variability in target domain. Our proposed approach is based on optimizing over a parameterized family of local feature displacements that maximize the source-target adaptive similarity functions. Accordingly we propose formulating zero-shot learning (ZSL) using latent structural SVMs to learn our similarity functions from training data. As demonstration we design a specific algorithm under the proposed framework involving bilinear similarity functions and regularized least squares as penalties for feature displacement. We test our approach on several benchmark datasets for ZSR and show significant improvement over the state-of-the-art. For instance, on aP&Y dataset we can achieve 80.89% in terms of recognition accuracy, outperforming the state-of-the-art by 11.15%

    Learning joint feature adaptation for zero-shot recognition

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    Zero-shot recognition (ZSR) aims to recognize target-domain data instances of unseen classes based on the models learned from associated pairs of seen-class source and target domain data. One of the key challenges in ZSR is the relative scarcity of source-domain features (e.g. one feature vector per class), which do not fully account for wide variability in target-domain instances. In this paper we propose a novel framework of learning data-dependent feature transforms for scoring similarity between an arbitrary pair of source and target data instances to account for the wide variability in target domain. Our proposed approach is based on optimizing over a parameterized family of local feature displacements that maximize the source-target adaptive similarity functions. Accordingly we propose formulating zero-shot learning (ZSL) using latent structural SVMs to learn our similarity functions from training data. As demonstration we design a specific algorithm under the proposed framework involving bilinear similarity functions and regularized least squares as penalties for feature displacement. We test our approach on several benchmark datasets for ZSR and show significant improvement over the state-of-the-art. For instance, on aP&Y dataset we can achieve 80.89% in terms of recognition accuracy, outperforming the state-of-the-art by 11.15%

    Group Membership Prediction

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    The group membership prediction (GMP) problem involves predicting whether or not a collection of instances share a certain semantic property. For instance, in kinship verification given a collection of images, the goal is to predict whether or not they share a {\it familial} relationship. In this context we propose a novel probability model and introduce latent {\em view-specific} and {\em view-shared} random variables to jointly account for the view-specific appearance and cross-view similarities among data instances. Our model posits that data from each view is independent conditioned on the shared variables. This postulate leads to a parametric probability model that decomposes group membership likelihood into a tensor product of data-independent parameters and data-dependent factors. We propose learning the data-independent parameters in a discriminative way with bilinear classifiers, and test our prediction algorithm on challenging visual recognition tasks such as multi-camera person re-identification and kinship verification. On most benchmark datasets, our method can significantly outperform the current state-of-the-art.Comment: accepted for ICCV 201

    BPGrad: Towards Global Optimality in Deep Learning via Branch and Pruning

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    Understanding the global optimality in deep learning (DL) has been attracting more and more attention recently. Conventional DL solvers, however, have not been developed intentionally to seek for such global optimality. In this paper we propose a novel approximation algorithm, BPGrad, towards optimizing deep models globally via branch and pruning. Our BPGrad algorithm is based on the assumption of Lipschitz continuity in DL, and as a result it can adaptively determine the step size for current gradient given the history of previous updates, wherein theoretically no smaller steps can achieve the global optimality. We prove that, by repeating such branch-and-pruning procedure, we can locate the global optimality within finite iterations. Empirically an efficient solver based on BPGrad for DL is proposed as well, and it outperforms conventional DL solvers such as Adagrad, Adadelta, RMSProp, and Adam in the tasks of object recognition, detection, and segmentation
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