7 research outputs found

    A Microwave-Responsive Supramolecular Adhesive for Strong Adhesion of Thermolabile Substrates

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    We report a microwave-responsive supramolecular adhesive through the construction of cross-linked networks based on the coordination interaction between iron oxide nanoparticles and a catechol-based polymer. By microwave irradiation, the supramolecular adhesive can be quickly and selectively heated, causing strong adhesion for thermolabile substrates with negligible thermal damage. It can firmly and reversibly bond with diverse plastic substrates and shows an adhesion strength of 3.5 MPa toward glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin. Moreover, it displays excellent multiple reusability with almost no loss of adhesion strength after ten times reuse. Owing to the strong penetrability of microwave heating, it is anticipated that this kind of supramolecular adhesive shows great potential in microelectronics and fine chemical industry

    A Microwave-Responsive Supramolecular Adhesive for Strong Adhesion of Thermolabile Substrates

    No full text
    We report a microwave-responsive supramolecular adhesive through the construction of cross-linked networks based on the coordination interaction between iron oxide nanoparticles and a catechol-based polymer. By microwave irradiation, the supramolecular adhesive can be quickly and selectively heated, causing strong adhesion for thermolabile substrates with negligible thermal damage. It can firmly and reversibly bond with diverse plastic substrates and shows an adhesion strength of 3.5 MPa toward glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin. Moreover, it displays excellent multiple reusability with almost no loss of adhesion strength after ten times reuse. Owing to the strong penetrability of microwave heating, it is anticipated that this kind of supramolecular adhesive shows great potential in microelectronics and fine chemical industry

    A Microwave-Responsive Supramolecular Adhesive for Strong Adhesion of Thermolabile Substrates

    No full text
    We report a microwave-responsive supramolecular adhesive through the construction of cross-linked networks based on the coordination interaction between iron oxide nanoparticles and a catechol-based polymer. By microwave irradiation, the supramolecular adhesive can be quickly and selectively heated, causing strong adhesion for thermolabile substrates with negligible thermal damage. It can firmly and reversibly bond with diverse plastic substrates and shows an adhesion strength of 3.5 MPa toward glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin. Moreover, it displays excellent multiple reusability with almost no loss of adhesion strength after ten times reuse. Owing to the strong penetrability of microwave heating, it is anticipated that this kind of supramolecular adhesive shows great potential in microelectronics and fine chemical industry

    Faradaic Rectification in Electrochemical Deionization and Its Influence on Cyclic Stability

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    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is a typical configuration of electrochemical deionization, which suffers from severe desalination capacity degradation derived from uncontrolled parasitic reactions. In this work, Faradaic rectification, the phenomenon by which electrode potentials and side reactions are dynamically regulated due to the asymmetrical anode/cathode Faradaic reactions, was studied under various CDI operation conditions. It was found that the Faradaic rectification in CDI would lead to capacity degradation indirectly by accelerating carbon anode oxidation and would be influenced by the cell voltage, flow rate, and asymmetric electrode construction. We also found an unconventional degradation mechanism in Faradaic cathode hybrid-CDI (HCDI) caused by the dramatic electrode-potential redistribution, which is derived from Faradaic rectification rather than the electrode structure decay. By adding a cation-exchange membrane to block the dissolved oxygen from cathode, the Faradaic rectification was suppressed successfully, and thus, the cyclic performance of CDI and HCDI was significantly increased by 59 and 46%, respectively (in 100 h cycling). This study provides an insight into understanding the Faradaic rectification in electrochemical deionization and its influence on CDI/HCDI cyclic stability, which should be of value to future explore cost-competitive membrane-less electrochemical deionization construction

    Measurements of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed from OH-initiated Photo-oxidation of Isoprene Using Online Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

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    Isoprene is a significant source of atmospheric organic aerosol; however, the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and involved chemical reaction pathways have remained to be elucidated. Recent works have shown that the photo-oxidation of isoprene leads to form SOA. In this study, the chemical composition of SOA from the OH-initiated photo-oxidation of isoprene, in the absence of seed aerosols, was investigated through the controlled laboratory chamber experiments. Thermal desorption/tunable vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (TD-VUV-TOF-PIAMS) was used in conjunction with the environmental chamber to study SOA formation. The mass spectra obtained at different photon energies and the photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra of the SOA products can be obtained in real time. Aided by the ionization energies (IE) either from the ab initio calculations or the literatures, a number of SOA products were proposed. In addition to methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, and 3-methyl-furan, carbonyls, hydroxycarbonyls, nitrates, hydroxynitrates, and other oxygenated compounds in SOA formed in laboratory photo-oxiadation experiments were identified, some of them were investigated for the first time. Detailed chemical identification of SOA is crucial for understanding the photo-oxidation mechanisms of VOCs and the eventual formation of SOA. Possible reaction mechanisms will be discussed

    Hierarchically Porous Carbon Derived from PolyHIPE for Supercapacitor and Deionization Applications

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    Hierarchically porous carbon (HPC) materials with interconnected porous texture are produced from a porous poly­(divinylbenzene) precursor, which is synthesized by polymerizing high-internal-phase emulsions. After carbonation, the macroporous structures of the poly­(divinylbenzene) precursor are preserved and enormous micro-/mesopores via carbonation with KOH are produced, resulting in an interconnected hierarchically porous network. The prepared HPC has a maximum specific surface area of 2189 m<sup>2</sup> g<sup>–1</sup>. The electrode materials for supercapacitors and capacitive deionization devices employing the formed HPC exhibit a high specific capacity of 88 mA h g<sup>–1</sup> through a voltage range of 1 V (319 F g<sup>–1</sup> at 1 A g<sup>–1</sup>) and a superior electrosorption capacity of 21.3 mg g<sup>–1</sup> in 500 mg L<sup>–1</sup> NaCl solution. The excellent capacitive performance could be ascribed to the combination of high specific surface area and favorable hierarchically porous structure

    CODD-Pred: A Web Server for Efficient Target Identification and Bioactivity Prediction of Small Molecules

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    Target identification and bioactivity prediction are critical steps in the drug discovery process. Here we introduce CODD-Pred (COmprehensive Drug Design Predictor), an online web server with well-curated data sets from the GOSTAR database, which is designed with a dual purpose of predicting potential protein drug targets and computing bioactivity values of small molecules. We first designed a double molecular graph perception (DMGP) framework for target prediction based on a large library of 646 498 small molecules interacting with 640 human targets. The framework achieved a top-5 accuracy of over 80% for hitting at least one target on both external validation sets. Additionally, its performance on the external validation set comprising 200 molecules surpassed that of four existing target prediction servers. Second, we collected 56 targets closely related to the occurrence and development of cancer, metabolic diseases, and inflammatory immune diseases and developed a multi-model self-validation activity prediction (MSAP) framework that enables accurate bioactivity quantification predictions for small-molecule ligands of these 56 targets. CODD-Pred is a handy tool for rapid evaluation and optimization of small molecules with specific target activity. CODD-Pred is freely accessible at http://codd.iddd.group/
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