139 research outputs found

    The Effect of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Psychosocial Wellbeing

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    As a result of adversity, trauma, or maltreatment, a child’s primary defense is to engage in self-blame in order to maintain a belief in a safe world. Without intervention, these adaptive strategies may continue to shape the way survivors relate to themselves and make meaning out of negative events. This study hypothesized that participants with adversity in childhood have an increased likelihood of low self-compassion (indicating tendencies towards self-judgment, overidentification, and isolation). This study further hypothesized a positive correlation between posttraumatic growth, resilience and hardiness. Participants in this study were adults recruited from three online sites (social networking, online forum, and a local university); participants ranged in age from 18-64, sexually and ethnically diverse. The majority of participants were white, United States born, female, and were between the age of 18-24. Participants were surveyed using the Adverse Childhood Experience survey, Self-Compassion Scale- Short Form, Connor Davidson Resilience Scale, Hardiness Questionnaire, Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, and two one-item scales measuring religion and attachment. Results were analyzed using a Pearson correlation and path analysis. Self-compassion was not significantly correlated to ACEs, and a strong correlation was observed between resilience and self-compassion. Resilience and posttraumatic growth had a moderate correlation, resilience and hardiness had a strong correlation, and there was no significant correlation observed between hardiness and posttraumatic growth. The results from the path analysis found that resilience mediates the relationship between adversity and the development of posttraumatic growth. Moreover, adversity in childhood had a small negative correlation to religion, resilience, self-compassion, and hardiness

    Hydrodynamic propulsion of human sperm

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    The detailed fluid mechanics of sperm propulsion are fundamental to our understanding of reproduction. In this paper, we aim to model a human sperm swimming in a microscope slide chamber. We model the sperm itself by a distribution of regularized stokeslets over an ellipsoidal sperm head and along an infinitesimally thin flagellum. The slide chamber walls are modelled as parallel plates, also discretized by a distribution of regularized stokeslets. The sperm flagellar motion, used in our model, is obtained by digital microscopy of human sperm swimming in slide chambers. We compare the results of our simulation with previous numerical studies of flagellar propulsion, and compare our computations of sperm kinematics with those of the actual sperm measured by digital microscopy. We find that there is an excellent quantitative match of transverse and angular velocities between our simulations and experimental measurements of sperm. We also find a good qualitative match of longitudinal velocities and computed tracks with those measured in our experiment. Our computations of average sperm power consumption fall within the range obtained by other authors. We use the hydrodynamic model, and a prototype flagellar motion derived from experiment, as a predictive tool, and investigate how sperm kinematics are affected by changes to head morphology, as human sperm have large variability in head size and shape. Results are shown which indicate the increase in predicted straight-line velocity of the sperm as the head width is reduced and the increase in lateral movement as the head length is reduced. Predicted power consumption, however, shows a minimum close to the normal head aspect ratio

    Comparative growth rates in wild types and carotenoid mutants of Sporobolomyces salmonicolor

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    Sporobolomyces salmonicolor is a pink basidiomycetous funus. When a cell produces a bud, the bud is devoid of a nucleus until it is nearly grown. At this time, the nucleus of the parent cell divides, one of the daughter nuclei passing into the bud and the other remaining in the parent. Cells are also capable of producing aerial sterigmata on which spores develop and become situated asymmetrically on the end of the sterigmata like the basidlospores of the hymenomycetes. Just before the spore attains full size, a nucleus migrates from the parent cell through the sterigma into the spore. Violent discharge of the spore takes place immediately after a drop of liquid, appearing at the hilum of the spore, reaches the size of the spore, both spore and drop being shot away together. It is therefore easy to develop colonies from single spores for genetic study by isolation of the individual spores

    Utilization of Assay Performance Characteristics to Estimate Hemoglobin A1c Result Reliability

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    BACKGROUND: Allowable total error (TE(a)) goals for hemoglobin (Hb) A(1c) require minimal assay imprecision and bias and implementation of a robust QC monitoring program. Here, we compare the combined influence on the risk of reporting unreliable results of TE(a) goals, a routine QC practice, and assay performance characteristics of 6 Hb A(1c) instruments across 4 academic medical centers. METHODS: The CLSI protocols EP-5 and EP-9 were applied to investigate Hb A(1c) result imprecision and bias on the Variant II Turbo and Variant II (Bio-Rad), G8 (Tosoh), Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing (Sebia), COBAS Integra 800 (Roche), and DCA Vantage (Siemens). Patient-weighted σ values and the risk of reporting unreliable Hb A(1c) results were determined for each assay at TE(a) specifications of 5%, 6%, and 7%. RESULTS: A large range of patient-weighted σ values spanning 0.5 orders of magnitude at a 6% TE(a) was observed. Although imprecision for all instruments was <3%, bias impacted the majority of the σ changes observed. Estimates for reporting unreliable results varied almost 500-fold based on analytical performance alone. CONCLUSIONS: Considerable differences in the probability of reporting unreliable Hb A(1c) results between different NGSP (formerly the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program)-certified platforms were observed. At a 6% TE(a), our study indicates all but the Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing requires that the maximum affordable QC be run. Risk estimates for individual laboratories' Hb A(1c) methods can be used to assess QC practices and residual risk of an unreliable Hb A(1c) result

    Perfusion CT in Patients With Spontaneous Lobar Intracerebral Hemorrhage

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    Experimental Hypertension

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    Series parallel connected composite amplifiers

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    Thesis (M.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1983.MICROFICHE COPY AVAILABLE IN ARCHIVES AND ENGINEERINGIncludes bibliographical references.by George B. Yundt.M.S

    CRYSTALLINE XYLAN AND MANNAN

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