234 research outputs found

    Parameter values for vessel wall mechanics.

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    <p><i>D</i><sub><i>0</i></sub>, passive vessel diameter; <i>C</i><sub><i>myo</i></sub>, activation tension sensitivity; <i>C</i><sub><i>pass</i></sub> and <i>C'</i><sub><i>pass</i></sub>, passive tension strength and sensitivity, respectively; <i>C</i><sub><i>act</i></sub>, <i>C'</i><sub><i>act</i></sub>, and <i>C"</i><sub><i>act</i></sub>, maximally active peak tension, length dependence, and tension range, respectively; <i>C</i><sub><i>meta</i></sub>, activation conducted response sensitivity.</p><p>Parameter values for vessel wall mechanics.</p

    Model predicted pressure-flow curves.

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    <p>(A) Pressure-flow relations predicted by models with and without myocardial compression effect and zero-flow pressure model are compared with experimental data. (B) The effect of parameter K on predicted pressure-flow relation.</p

    Illustration of transmural pressure, internal pressure, external pressure and vessel wall tension.

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    <p>Illustration of transmural pressure, internal pressure, external pressure and vessel wall tension.</p

    Predicted diameter changes in adenosine infusion and inhibition of NO synthesis conditions were compared with experimental data.

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    <p>(A) Diameter changes in adenosine infusion. (B) Diameter changes in inhibition of NO synthesis.</p

    The effect of oxygen demand on auto-regulation behavior.

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    <p>The effect of oxygen demand on auto-regulation behavior.</p

    Flow regulation behavior in blocked coronary during moderate exercise condition.

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    <p>(A) Normalized flow rate. (B) Activation. (C) Contributions of the response mechanisms. (Diameters of stenosis section were normalized to its value in reference state (without stenosis)).</p

    Representative segment model.

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    <p>Coronary vascular tree is represented by 11 regions connected in series. Each region is assumed to contain an array of identical segments in parallel.</p

    Values of structural and hemodynamic parameters in the reference state.

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    <p>Values in bold are prescribed, and the remaining values are calculated based on geometric and hemodynamic considerations.</p><p>Values of structural and hemodynamic parameters in the reference state.</p

    Ruthenium Poly(ethylenimine)/Gold Nanoparticles Immobilized on Dendritic Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for a CA15‑3 Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor via Cu<sub>2</sub>O@PDA Dual Quenching

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    The development of a specifically sensitive approach for CA15-3 detection is of great significance for the early diagnosis and treatment monitoring of breast cancer. In the present work, an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was constructed for the sensitive and selective detection of CA15-3 based on a dual-quenching strategy. Ru­(dcbpy)32+, poly­(ethylenimine) (PEI), and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were immobilized on dendritic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (DMSNs) (Ru-PEI/AuNPs@DMSNs) with high ECL efficiency due to the high loading amounts of Ru­(dcbpy)32+, the shortened electron-transfer path between the luminophore and coreactant, and the excellent conductivity and localized surface plasmon resonance effect of AuNPs. In the presence of CA15-3, a Cu2O nanoparticles coated with poly­(dopamine) (Cu2O@PDA) nanocomposite was introduced to the synthesized Ru-PEI/AuNPs@DMSNs through antigen–antibody interaction, resulting in a remarkable ECL quenching due to the dual quenchers of Cu2O and PDA. Under the optimal conditions, the fabricated sensor was used to detect CA15-3 in a wide linear range of 5.0 × 10–5–6.0 × 102 U mL–1 with a low limit of detection of 2.4 × 10–6 U mL–1. The dual-quenching ECL immunosensor was successfully applied for the determination of CA15-3 in patient serum, indicating the potential applicability of the present immuosensor for the clinical determination of CA15-3 and other cancer biomarkers

    Preference for infant-directed speech in infants with hearing aids (Wang et al., 2018)

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    <div><b>Purpose: </b>It is well established that (a) infants prefer listening to infant-directed speech (IDS) over adult-directed speech (ADS), and (b) IDS facilitates speech, language, and cognitive development, compared with ADS. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether infants with hearing aids (HAs), similar to their peers with normal hearing (NH), show a listening preference for IDS over ADS.</div><div><b>Method: </b>A total of 42 infants participated in the study. In Experiment 1, 9 infants with hearing loss, who had approximately 12 months of experience (mean chronological age of 17.57 months) with HAs, and 9 infants with NH, who had similar chronological age (17.54 months), were tested. In Experiment 2, 10 infants with hearing loss, who had approximately 4 months of experience (mean chronological age of 9.86 months) with HAs, and 14 infants with NH, who had similar chronological age (9.09 months), were tested. Infants were tested on their listening preference in 3 randomized blocks: IDS versus silence, ADS versus silence, and IDS versus ADS blocks, using the central fixation preference procedure.</div><div><b>Results: </b>Experiment 1 showed that infants with HAs, similar to their peers with NH, listened longer to both IDS and ADS relative to silence; however, neither infants with HAs nor infants with NH showed a listening preference for IDS over ADS. In Experiment 2, both infants with HAs and infants with NH showed a listening preference for IDS and ADS relative to silence; in addition, both groups preferred listening to IDS over ADS.</div><div><b>Conclusions:</b> Infants with HAs appear to have sufficient access to the acoustic cues in the speech that allow them to develop an age-equivalent IDS preference. This may be attributed to a combination of being able to use the hearing they do have before receiving HAs and early device fitting. Given previously demonstrated positive associations between IDS preference and language development, this research encourages early interventions focusing on maximizing early auditory experience in infants with hearing loss.</div><div><br></div><div><b>Supplemental Material S1.</b> Acoustic characteristics: mean F0 (Hz), F0 range (Hz), and sentence durations (s) of infant-directed speech (IDS) and adult-directed speech (ADS) stimuli for each speaker.</div><div><br></div><div>Wang, Y., Bergeson, T. R., & Houston, D. M. (2018). Preference for infant-directed speech in infants with hearing aids: Effects of early auditory experience. <i>Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 61, </i>2431–2439<i>.</i> https://doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0086</div
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