60 research outputs found

    Final Words, Final Shots: Kurosawa, Bortko and the Conclusion of Dostoevsky???s Idiot

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    In their article "Final Words, Final Shots: Kurosawa, Bortko, and the Conclusion of Dostoevsky???s Idiot" Robert O. Efird and Saera Yoon discuss film adaptations of Dostoevsky???s novel. Both in his homeland and abroad, the major works of Fyodor Dostoevsky have largely made for disappointing film adaptations. This article examines the cultural diversity and aesthetic motivations underlying two very different adaptations of his novel Idiot, with particular attention to the concluding scenes. Both Akira Kurosawa and Vladimir Bortko follow the novelist's lead by hinting at some form of hope and future redemption amidst the tragedy but, for different reasons, they both fail to capture the rich ambiguity and creative ambivalence of Dostoevsky's final words. As the authors argue, the novelist's fluid dialogic aesthetic tends to disappear in visual adaptations, yet paradoxically thrives when released into new contexts less dependent on fidelity to his words. These two adaptations, despite their relative success, demonstrate the inherent difficulty of cinematizing the dynamics of Dostoevsky's art

    Final Words, Final Shots: Kurosawa, Bortko and the Conclusion of Dostoevsky’s \u3cem\u3eIdiot\u3c/em\u3e

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    In their article Final Words, Final Shots: Kurosawa, Bortko, and the Conclusion of Dostoevsky’s Idiot Robert O. Efird and Saera Yoon discuss film adaptations of Dostoevsky’s novel. Both in his homeland and abroad, the major works of Fyodor Dostoevsky have largely made for disappointing film adaptations. This article examines the cultural diversity and aesthetic motivations underlying two very different adaptations of his novel Idiot, with particular attention to the concluding scenes. Both Akira Kurosawa and Vladimir Bortko follow the novelist\u27s lead by hinting at some form of hope and future redemption amidst the tragedy but, for different reasons, they both fail to capture the rich ambiguity and creative ambivalence of Dostoevsky\u27s final words. As the authors argue, the novelist\u27s fluid dialogic aesthetic tends to disappear in visual adaptations, yet paradoxically thrives when released into new contexts less dependent on fidelity to his words. These two adaptations, despite their relative success, demonstrate the inherent difficulty of cinematizing the dynamics of Dostoevsky\u27s art

    Intertextuality in kurosawa's film adaptation of dostoevsky's The Idiot

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    Analyzes the role intertextuality plays in the adjustments Akira Kurosawa made when he translated the classic novel by Dostoevsky onto screen. Kurosawa's (Hakuchi), a film adaptation of Dostoevsky's The Idiot, has been the subject of mixed reviews. While some consider the film a successful adaptation that captures the spirit of the original, others criticize Hakuchi for its overly faithful rendition of the novel. What has been missing is an investigation of Kurosawa's filmic strategy. Yoon examines the transposition of a chronotope - the spatial move from the center to the periphery and the treatment of the time setting - and suggests that Hakuchi is no simple modernization of the novel, but a work in which we can see how Kurosawa fleshes out his own interpretation of a tragic journey. In so doing, it becomes apparent that Kurosawa rationalizes the polyphonic novel and attempts to create a new kind of melodrama.close

    Intertextuality in Kurosawa\u27s Film Adaptation of Dostoevsky\u27s The Idiot

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    In her article, Intertextuality in Kurosawa\u27s Film Adaptation of Dostoevsky\u27s The Idiot Saera Yoon analyzes the role intertextuality plays in the adjustments Akira Kurosawa made when he translated the classic novel by Dostoevsky onto screen. Kurosawa\u27s 白痴 (Hakuchi), a film adaptation of Dostoevsky\u27s The Idiot, has been the subject of mixed reviews. While some consider the film a successful adaptation that captures the spirit of the original, others criticize Hakuchi for its overly faithful rendition of the novel. What has been missing is an investigation of Kurosawa\u27s filmic strategy. Yoon examines the transposition of a chronotope — the spatial move from the center to the periphery and the treatment of the time setting — and suggests that Hakuchi is no simple modernization of the novel, but a work in which we can see how Kurosawa fleshes out his own interpretation of a tragic journey. In so doing, it becomes apparent that Kurosawa rationalizes the polyphonic novel and attempts to create a new kind of melodrama

    From Natal'ia to Marfa : the Evolution of Karamzin's Historical Tales

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    Karamzin left an indelible mark on Russian literature with his contributions to the development of the nascent national literature. Karamzin, a truly gigantic figure, served as a role model for his admirers in the realm of historical fiction and historiography. Among others, A. S. Pushkin and N. V. Gogol followed in Karamzin???s footsteps and tried hand on both history writing and historical tales. This paper is an examination of Karamzin???s two historical tales, ???Natl???ia, the Boyar???s Daughter??? (1792) and ???Marfa, the Mayoress??? (1802). Given that the two works were written ten years apart, the investigation of the two tales will offer us an insight into the evolution of Karamzinian aesthetics. The first significant transition from ???Natl???ia??? to ???Marfa??? is to be found in the treatment of the historical past. While ???Natal???ia??? is set in the fuzzy past, without specific temporal markers, ???Marfa??? is anchored in concrete historical event as it deals with the fall of Novgorod. The shift points to the course taken by the author in looking at history. Karamzin aspires to represent the ideal history in ???Natal???ia,??? which embodies the essence of Sentimental values. Yet ten years later, the author assumes a significantly different view on the national history, which results in a much more serious and authoritative tone of the narrator of ???Marfa.??? Similarly, Natal???ia and Marfa, the eponymous heroines of the two tales, testify to the evolution of Karamzin???s treatment of history. Whereas Natal???ia symbolizes the ideal girl of Russian past, embodying all the major virtues of a Sentimental heroine, Marfa is a much more complex figure, representing, on the one hand, a motherly leader and, on the other hand, a widow consumed with irrational passion. All in all, ???Marfa??? is a clear breakaway from the Sentimental historical tale and prepares the author to turn to full-fledged historiography. Interestingly, though, Karamzin???s legacy of historical fiction relies more upon ???Natal???ia??? than ???Marfa.??? The Captain's Daughter by Pushkin and Taras Bul'ba by Gogol reveal their indebtedness to Karamzin's view of the interrelationship between history and human, and his treatment of historical time, both of which are best represented in ???Natal'ia.???.clos

    Enclosure and Rupture : Gogol???s ???Old-World Landowners???

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    ?????? ????????? ?????????(1835)??? ????????? ?????? ??????????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ??? ???????????? ?????????. ???????????? ???????????? ??? ??????????????? ???????????? ????????? ????????? ??????????????? ??? ????????? ?????? ????????? ???????????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ????????????. ??? ????????? ?????? ????????? ???????????? ??????????????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ?????? ??????????????? "??????"??? "??????"????????? ??????????????? ??????????????? ????????????. ?????? ?????? ????????? ?????????????????????????? ???????????????? ??? ????????? ?????? ????????? ??????, ??? "??????, ??????, ??????"??? ??????????????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ????????????. ?????? ??????????????? ?????? ????????????????????? ???????????? ????????? "?????????"??? ????????? ????????? ?????????. ???????????? ?????? ????????? ???????????? ?????????????????? ?????????, ?????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ???????????? ????????? ????????? ??????????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ??? ?????? ???????????? ????????? ?????? ???????????? ?????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ??????????????? ?????? ????????????. ????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ???????????? ?????? ????????? ?????? ?????? ????????? ?????? ??????. ???????????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ??? ????????? ???????????? ???????????? ?????? ???????????? ????????????. ???????????? ????????? ?????? ??????????????? "??????"??? ????????????. ??? ????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ??????????????? ???????????? ????????? ???????????? ????????????. ???????????? ?????? ????????? ?????? ???????????? ????????? ???????????? ???????????? ???????????? ???????????? ????????????. ?????? ?????? ???????????? ?????? ?????? ??? ????????? ???????????? ?????? ?????? ??????????????????. ????????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ???????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ???????????? ????????? ??????. ????????? ??? ????????? "???"??? ?????? ????????? ??????. ???????????? ??????, ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ??????????????? ??? ?????? ?????????. ?????? ????????? ???????????? ???????????? ??????????????? ??????????????? ????????? ??? ????????? ?????????????????? ????????????. ?????? ??????????????? ????????? ???????????? ?????? ????????? "???????????? ????????????"??? ??????????????? ??? ????????? ????????????. ?????? ???????????? ??? ????????? ?????? ???????????? ???????????? ?????? ????????????. ??? ?????? ???????????? ??? ????????? "???????????? ????????????"??? ???????????? ????????? ?????? ??????. ????????? ????????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ??????????????? ?????? ?????? ??????????????????. ?????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ???????????? ????????????, ????????? ???????????? ????????????.clos

    In Search of the Sentimentalist Narrator: A Study of ???Bednaia Liza???

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    1792?????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ???????????? ???????????? ???????????? ????????? "????????????"??? ??????????????? 18????????? ???????????? ??????????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ???????????? ????????????. ????????? ???????????? ???????????? ?????? ??? ??????????????? ?????????????????? ???????????? ????????? ?????? ?????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ?????? ??????. ??? ???????????? ?????? ???????????? ?????? ?????? ????????? ?????? ???????????? ????????? ???????????? ??? ?????? ?????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ????????????. ?????? ????????? ???????????? ??????????????? ??????????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ??? ????????? ???????????? ????????? ???????????? ?????? ??? ????????? ???????????? ???????????? ?????? ????????? ?????? ???????????? ?????? ????????? ?????? ??? ?????? ????????????. ??? ?????? ????????? ?????? ???????????? ???????????? ????????? ???????????? ??????????????? ?????? ???????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ???????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ?????????. ???????????? ????????? ????????? ??????, ????????? ????????? ??????/???????????? ???????????? ????????? ????????????. ????????? ?????? ????????? ??????????????? ????????? ?????? ??? ?????? ????????? ????????????. ?????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ??????????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ??? ????????? ???????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ?????? ???????????? ??? ?????? ????????????. ?????? ????????? ????????? ?????????????????? ????????? ????????? ?????????????????? ???????????? ?????? ?????? ???????????? ???????????? ????????? ?????? ?????????. ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ????????????. ????????? ??????????????? ?????? ???????????? ???????????? ???????????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ???????????? ??????????????? ?????? ????????? ???????????? ?????? ??????????????? ????????? ??? ????????????. ??????????????? ??? ???????????? ???????????? ???????????? ???????????? ?????? ????????? ???????????? ???????????? ????????? ?????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ?????????, ????????? ???????????? ????????? ????????? ?????? ??? ???????????? ?????????????????? ?????????.clos

    ????????? ????????? ????????? ??????????????? ??????: ?????? ????????? ??????

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    Novgorod occupies a special position in Russian culture. The city boasts of its colorful history adorned with its mercantile ties with Western Europe in the medieval age. Yet the most unique element of its history lies in its experience of the "republicanism," a political system Russia eradicated since the downfall of Novgorod. While Novgorod succumbed to Moscow in the fifteenth century and never regained its glory, it was reborn as a viable literary theme in Russian literature in the late eighteenth century. This paper overviews the theme of Novgorod, looking into the individual manifestations from a play written by Catherine the Great to a poema by Lermontov. In particular, so-called "Vadim Novgorodskii," a character caught between history and myth, looms large as he serves as the representative of Novgorod"s freedom against the oppression under a foreign ruler. The treatment of Vadim Novgorodskii undergoes noteworthy changes from the eighteenth century to the nineteenth century. Despite major differences in the interpretation Of vadim, both Catherine the Great and Kniazhnin created Vadim as, first and foremost, a political animal. Placed in the middle of power struggle, Vadim"s actions are motivated by political cause to reclaim liberty. This political dimension remains intact in the works produced in the nineteenth century. Yet Pushkin and Lermontov added another significant dimension to the rebel: personal history steeped with Romantic traits. At the hands of two great Russian writers, Vadim is created as a thoroughly unfortunate hero who suffers from failures in multiple aspects: his noble ideals and personal happiness are both cruelly crushed by fate. Consequently, Vadim is endowed with more sophisticated personality and Pushkin as well as Lermontov attempted to transform Vadim from a one-dimensional political rebel to a multi-faceted Romantic hero.clos

    Intertextuality in The Turkish Gambit: Tolstoy and Akunin

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    Identity and Politics: Film Adaptation of Taras Bulba

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    This paper aims at examining the political and cultural spectrum of Vladimir Bortko???s film Taras Bulba (2009), a reinterpretation of the novella by Nikolai Gogol (1842). As the film was conceived and released to mark the two centennial anniversary of the writer???s birth, Bortko faithfully follows the path charted out by Gogol in 1842, particularly the infamous ???Russification??? of Ukranian Cossacks. By heavily referencing to Russian cultural treasures such as Tiutchev???s poem, paintings, and Eisenstein???s film, Bortko reinforces Gogol???s political ideology with regards to Ukrainian Cossacks. Yet Bortko???s film adaptation diverges from the Gogol???s 1842 novella in its treatment of Poland, the representative of Western Europe. Overall, the film appears to reiterate Gogol???s hostility towards the Catholic civilization. Nevertheless, Bortko inserts a significant twist of plot (the episode surrounding the birth of the Polish lady???s son by Andrii) into his film narrative and in so doing, leaves a room for a different vision for future, in comparison with Gogol???s work. Therefore, Bortko???s film interpretation operates in two tracks that beg for discrimination: on the one hand, an affirmation of the Russian identity of Ukrainian Cossacks and, on the other hand, a subtle duplicity of Russia???s relationship with the West.clos
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