339 research outputs found

    Replacing fossil fuels wtih solar energy in an SME in UK and Kurdistan, Iraq: Kansas fried chicken case study

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    Energy management and analysis are more common in large companies since they have the resources and commitment to assign such tasks to employee compared to SMEs. Only a very small proportion of the overall business costs pertains to energy requirements and therefore SMEs pay little attention to energy analysis and management. Fossil fuels, which cause issues related to global warming, can viably be replaced with renewable energy sources such as solar energy. Trends in solar cell development are likely to yield a potential solution to problems generated by an over reliance on fossil fuels. Solar solutions are relatively simple to implement in SMEs than in large corporation and the combined impact small businesses is likely to be much greater. A micro-business has been utilized as a cases study for the purposes of illustration in the UK and Kurdistan-Iraq. Even though Kurdistan-Iraq is abundant in oil and gas, its climatic favour the implementation of solar cells which can replace the existing use of non-renewable fossil fuel. Our comparative study suggests that solar can replaced a reasonable amount of the energy needs even in the UK and a much higher amount in Kurdistan-Iraq. Using 20% efficient solar, can replace 23% and 70% of the energy requirements of the microbusiness in UK and Kurdistan-Iraq respectively

    第774回 千葉医学会例会・第二内科例会 54.

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    InterProScan results. InterProScan [34] queries sequences against 16 member databases enabling protein classification by family as well as by conserved domains; the number of annotations and the percent of sequences receiving annotations varied across the different databases. (XLSX 32 kb

    Table_1_Generalized Trust and Financial Risk-Taking in China – A Contextual and Individual Analysis.docx

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    <p>Previous evidence from developed nations has suggested that more trusting individuals are more likely to take financial risks, such as investing in the stock market. Previous studies have found that Chinese citizens have particularly high generalized trust and are more risk-seeking in investment compared with Americans, which makes China an interesting case. The current study examines the relation between generalized trust and stock market participation in China at both a contextual and individual level. Across provinces, a lower level of generalized trust was associated with stock market participation. For example, the stock market participation was four times higher in provinces with the lowest level of perceived fairness than in provinces with the highest level of perceived fairness. The contextual effects of less generalized trust suggest an association between risk-taking behaviors and societal level inequality. At the individual level, trust of strangers was associated with risk preference in highly educated and wealthy people but its effect on risk behaviors was not clear. The findings suggest that trust may affect financial risk-taking behavior at different levels through different pathways, and that cultural differences in understanding of trust also need to be considered.</p

    Additional file 1: of Transcriptomic analysis reveals unique molecular factors for lipid hydrolysis, secondary cell-walls and oxidative protection associated with thermotolerance in perennial grass

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    Heat map of GO term enrichment analysis for up-regulated DEGs in A. stolonifera (P) and A. scabra (N). Scale represents log10 of P-value in the enrichment analysis. (JPEG 575 kb

    Additional file 1 of Association between obesity, physical activity, and cognitive decline in Chinese middle and old-aged adults: a mediation analysis

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    Supplementary Material 1: Table S1. Permutations of trajectory groups of cognitive function scores and corresponding Bayesian Information Criterion. Table S2. The participants' characteristics according to the cognitive function trajectory groups. Table S3. Association between lipid metabolites with trajectories of cognitive function. Figure S1. Trajectories of the cognitive function score and its five measures (immediate word recall, delayed word recall, orientation, visuo-construction, and attention). The solid lines mean estimated values and the dotted lines display the 95% CI

    The majority of persisting spores associated tightly with the lung tissue.

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    <p>Mice were inoculated i.n. with ∼1.3×10<sup>7</sup> spores/mouse (<b>A</b> and <b>B</b>) and ∼1.1×10<sup>8</sup> spores/mouse (<b>C</b> and <b>D</b>). Lungs were lavaged with sterile PBS and collected. Total bacteria (closed circles) and spore (open circles) titers in the lung tissues and BAL fluids at 2 (<b>A</b> and <b>C</b>) and 4 (<b>B</b> and <b>D</b>) weeks were determined. The results were combined from at least two independent experiments. *, <i>p</i><0.05; ***, <i>p</i><0.001; compared to respective total bacteria and spore titers in the lung tissue.</p

    Bacterial and spore burden in the lungs of mice at 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-intranasal inoculation.

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    <p>Mice were inoculated i.n. with ∼1.1×10<sup>8</sup> or ∼1.3×10<sup>7</sup> spores/mouse. Lungs were harvested at 2, 4, and 8 weeks, homogenized, and dilution plated with or without heat treatment. The results were combined from at least two independent experiments. Closed circles represent total viable bacteria and open circles heat-resistant dormant spores. *, <i>p</i><0.05; **, <i>p</i><0.01; compared to respective total bacteria and spore titers at 2 weeks.</p

    Confocal analysis of immunofluorescently stained lung sections.

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    <p>Lung sections were stained as described in the Materials and Methods section and analyzed by confocal microscopy. Representative images are shown. <b>A</b>, an image showing a spore (red) surrounded by F-actin (green). The projections show all planar views, including <i>xy</i> (center panel), <i>xz</i> (right panel) and <i>yz</i> (top panel)-stacks. <b>B</b>, the section was stained with wheat germ agglutinin to outline the plasma membrane (red) and anti-BclA antibodies to detect spores (green). Scale bars represent 10 µm.</p

    Representative images of immunofluorescently stained lung sections from mice challenged with <i>B. anthracis</i> spores.

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    <p>Mice were infected i.n. with ∼10<sup>8</sup> spores/mouse. Lungs were harvested at 2 and 4 weeks, fixed, sectioned and stained with anti-BclA antibodies and secondary antibodies conjugated to Alexa Fluor 594 (red), Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated phalliodin (green) and DAPI (blue), as described in the Materials and Methods section. Representative images are shown to indicate spore association with the small airway epithelium (<b>A</b> and <b>B</b>) and the alveolar epithelium (<b>C</b>–<b>E</b>). Arrows indicate spores. The areas around those spores were enlarged and shown in boxed insets. Scale bars represent 10 µm.</p

    <i>B. anthracis</i> spores persisted in the lung significantly better than spores of <i>B. subtilis</i>.

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    <p>Mice were inoculated i.n. with 7702 spores (<i>B. ant</i>), PY79 spores (<i>B. sub</i>), or overnight cultures of HB101 (<i>E. coli</i>) at a dose of ∼1.3×10<sup>7</sup> cfu/mouse. Lungs were harvested at 2 (<b>A</b>) and 4 (<b>B</b>) weeks post-inoculation, homogenized, and plated for total viable bacteria (closed circles) or heat-resistant dormant spores (open circles). The results were combined from at least 2 independent experiments. **, <i>p</i><0.01; ***, <i>p</i><0.001; compared to respective total bacteria and spore titers in <i>B. anthracis</i> infected lungs.</p
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