5 research outputs found

    Enforced Remote Work During the Covid-19 Pandemic: The Relationship between Remote Working Intensity and Employee Motivation Using A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    No full text
    Since the time corona virus disease (COVID-19) outbreak was first reported in December 2019, the world has never been the same. With rapid spread of the disease, individuals, organisations and governments took steps to curtail the damage that followed including travel restrictions, social distancing and remote working. Little is known based on empirical evidence of the relationship between remote working and employee motivation. This study employed survey research design, and analysed data using structural equation modelling. Using self-determination approach, the study found that, although remote working saved commuting time for employees and improved work-life balance for most, it did not improve employee motivation. One reason for this was that remote working took employees by surprise and many saw it as forced flexibility because they had no other option and had no input in the decision to work remotely. The negative relationship between remote working and employee motivation is also connected to lack of face-to-face collaboration, inadequate peer support and social isolation. Building digital competencies require time and effort, and the frequent interruption of work due to other demands at home negatively affected work, creating stress, mental health challenges and other psychosocial risk issues. These present an opportunity for organisations to formulate and implement policies that support remote working, and ultimately improve engagement and motivational outcomes in the new normal. Research paper Keywords: Remote working, COVID-19, work from home; basic psychological needs, self-determination, motivation Reference to this paper should be made as follows: Nwoko, C., & Yazdani, K. (2022). Enforced Remote Work During the Covid-19 Pandemic: The Relationship between Remote Working Intensity and Employee Motivation Using A Structural Equation Modelling Approach. Journal of Entrepreneurship, Business and Economics, 10(2S2), 165–200

    Remote Working during the Covid-19 Global Pandemic and its Implications for Employee Motivation: Some Evidence from Nigeria through the Lens of Self-Determination Theory

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    Following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, governments around the world took several safety measures, including enforced confinement to check the spread of the disease. These measures had economic, health, and psychosocial implications. On the other hand, the pandemic accelerated remote working and the deployment of technology to support this new way of working as businesses needed to continue functioning. Empirical research on the implication of these measures on the mental health, engagement, and motivation of employees abound in other jurisdictions, whereas it is limited in Nigeria. From a self-determination perspective, this study examines the mediating roles of organizational factors (OF) and employee’s individual situation (ES) on employee motivation during the pandemic. The study employed a survey research design while descriptive statistics, exploratory factor analysis, and structural equation modelling were used to analyze the data. Remote working intensity (RW) during the pandemic had a significant positive impact on organizational factors. Employee’s Individual Situation had a significant positive impact on Employee Motivation (EM). The study concludes that as good as remote working may seem, the enforced confinement led to increased stress levels, more mental health challenges, and lower motivation. The moderation role of basic psychological needs (PN) satisfaction was confirmed. The findings showed that employees who could influence their work schedule were more motivated. Higher levels of support from employers that enabled individuals to achieve desired results amidst the uncertainties created by the pandemic were also associated with better levels of motivation. Employees in organizations that found innovative ways for social connection and had regular check-ins by managers were more engaged and motivated because employers’ support was found to be empowering, produced better psychological health, and helped employees feel self-determined. Even though the study shows the association between remote working, basic psychological needs satisfaction, and employee motivation, how motivation level changes after some point or the degree to which it would change in the post-pandemic era remains unclear and should be an area for further study since motivation is not a unitary phenomenon

    Self-Determination Theory: The Mediating Role of Generational Differences in Employee Engagement

    No full text
    The fulfilment of basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness exists along a continuum from amotivation to intrinsic motivation. Between these extremes is extrinsic motivation. More than ever before, we have more generational gaps in today’s workplace, and it is generally believed that younger employees differ strongly from older generations in values and motivation. Generational differences were used as the mediating variable in this study, which examines the predictive validity of employee engagement using extrinsic and intrinsic motivation. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse data obtained from 564 respondents across different generational cohorts using structured questionnaire. The study found that generational differences do not positively mediate between extrinsic and intrinsic motivation and engagement outcomes. Generational differences in the workplace were found to be mostly exaggerated. Also, intrinsic motivation was more positively related to employee engagement than extrinsic motivation across all generations. Furthermore, we found that even though extrinsic and intrinsic motivation operates on different spectrums, they complement each other. These findings have important implications for managers, particularly because employee engagement is a critical enabler for productivity and employee retention

    Self-Leadership in a Remote Work Environment: Emerging Trends and Implications for Occupational Well-Being

    No full text
    When individuals are given the freedom to work remotely, self-discipline and self-motivation become more crucial. Remote work can present challenges to self-leadership as employees are required to independently prioritise their work, make decisions, and hold themselves accountable for meeting deadlines. In this study, structural equation modelling was used to analyse data from 206 employees with remote work experience. The study found that remote work characteristics have implications for occupational well-being and that they influence the effectiveness of leadership and the perception of work roles. It is important that managers ensure employees working remotely enjoy flexible work hours, autonomy, communication and collaboration for improved occupational well-being. This study contributes novel insights into self-leadership and psychological empowerment within the remote work context, emphasising their interconnectedness and implications for occupational well-being

    Enforced Remote Work During the Covid-19 Pandemic: The Relationship between Remote Working Intensity and Employee Motivation Using A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    No full text
    Since the time corona virus disease (COVID-19) outbreak was first reported in December 2019, the world has never been the same. With rapid spread of the disease, individuals, organisations and governments took steps to curtail the damage that followed including travel restrictions, social distancing and remote working. Little is known based on empirical evidence of the relationship between remote working and employee motivation. This study employed survey research design, and analysed data using structural equation modelling. Using self-determination approach, the study found that, although remote working saved commuting time for employees and improved work-life balance for most, it did not improve employee motivation. One reason for this was that remote working took employees by surprise and many saw it as forced flexibility because they had no other option and had no input in the decision to work remotely. The negative relationship between remote working and employee motivation is also connected to lack of face-to-face collaboration, inadequate peer support and social isolation. Building digital competencies require time and effort, and the frequent interruption of work due to other demands at home negatively affected work, creating stress, mental health challenges and other psychosocial risk issues. These present an opportunity for organisations to formulate and implement policies that support remote working, and ultimately improve engagement and motivational outcomes in the new normal. Research paper Keywords: Remote working, COVID-19, work from home; basic psychological needs, self-determination, motivation Reference to this paper should be made as follows: Nwoko, C., & Yazdani, K. (2022). Enforced Remote Work During the Covid-19 Pandemic: The Relationship between Remote Working Intensity and Employee Motivation Using A Structural Equation Modelling Approach. Journal of Entrepreneurship, Business and Economics, 10(2S2), 165–200
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