15 research outputs found

    Effects of <i>Pisolithus tinctorius</i> and <i>Cenococcum geophilum</i> inoculation on pine in copper-contaminated soil to enhance phytoremediation

    No full text
    <p>We used <i>Pisolithus tinctorius</i> and <i>Cenococcum geophilum</i> to determine the copper (Cu) resistance of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi and their potential for improving phytoremediation of Cu-contaminated soil by Chinese red pine (<i>Pinus tabulaeformis</i>). The results showed that nutrient accumulation in <i>C. geophilum</i> mycelium was significantly lower under higher Cu concentrations in the soil, which was not observed in <i>P. tinctorius.</i> Meanwhile, <i>P. tinctorius</i> exhibited greater Cu tolerance than <i>C. geophilum</i>. Inoculation with ECM fungi significantly improved the growth of pine shoots planted in polluted soil in pot experiments (p < 0.01). The total accumulated Cu in pine seedlings planted in Cu-contaminated soil increased by 72.8% and 113.3% when inoculated with <i>P. tinctorius</i> and <i>C. geophilum</i>, respectively, indicating that ECM fungi may help their host to phytoextract heavy metals. Furthermore, the majority of the total absorbed metals remained in the roots, confirming the ability of ECM fungi to promote heavy metal phytostabilization. There were no differences between the effects of the two fungi in helping the host stabilize and absorb Cu, even though they have different Cu tolerances. Inoculation with ECM fungi can benefit plant establishment in polluted environments and assist plants with phytoremediating heavy-metal-contaminated soils.</p

    Additional file 7: Figure S3. of Co-expression network analysis of the transcriptomes of rice roots exposed to various cadmium stresses reveals universal cadmium-responsive genes

    No full text
    Transport overview of 1772 DEGs in rice roots under Cd stress. DEGs were selected for the metabolic pathways analysis using the MapMan software (v3.6.0RC1). The colored boxes indicate the Log2 ratio of Cd1h/ck1h (1 h of Cd treated and untreated rice roots, respectively). (PPT 282 kb

    Additional file 4: Figure S1. of Co-expression network analysis of the transcriptomes of rice roots exposed to various cadmium stresses reveals universal cadmium-responsive genes

    No full text
    Quantitative RT-PCR of 8 randomly selected DEGs expression in in rice roots exposed to Cd for 1 h. Actin-1 (LOC4333919) was used to standardize transcript levels in each sample. The primers used in the qRT-PCR experiments are listed in additional Table S3. (PPT 75 kb

    The lower epidermis as shown by SEM.

    No full text
    <p>(<b>A</b>) Lower epidermis of <i>O</i>. <i>glazioviana</i>, (<b>B</b>) magnifying epidermal stoma of <i>O</i>. <i>glazioviana</i>, (<b>C</b>) lower epidermis of <i>E</i>. <i>haichowensis</i>, and (<b>D</b>) magnifying epidermal stoma of <i>E</i>. <i>haichowensis</i>.</p

    Microstructure of the root cells of two plant species.

    No full text
    <p>(<b>A</b>) Paraffin cross section of <i>O</i>. <i>glazioviana</i>, (<b>B</b>) electron micrograph of <i>O</i>. <i>glazioviana</i> cross-section, (<b>C</b>) paraffin cross section of <i>E</i>. <i>haichowensis</i>, and (<b>D</b>) electron micrograph of a cross section of <i>E</i>. <i>haichowensis</i>.</p

    Wax content in leaves and stomatal density of the leaf epidermis of <i>O</i>. <i>glazioviana</i> and <i>E</i>. <i>haichowensis</i> seedlings.

    No full text
    <p>Mean value followed by different letter is statistically significant (ANOVA; Duncan multiple range test, p<0.05).</p><p>Wax content in leaves and stomatal density of the leaf epidermis of <i>O</i>. <i>glazioviana</i> and <i>E</i>. <i>haichowensis</i> seedlings.</p

    Inorganic Polyphosphate Affects Biofilm Assembly, Capsule Formation, and Virulence of Hypervirulent ST23 Klebsiella pneumoniae

    No full text
    The emergence of hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP) strains poses a significant threat to public health due to high mortality rates and propensity to cause severe community-acquired infections in healthy individuals. The ability to form biofilms and produce a protective capsule contributes to its enhanced virulence and is a significant challenge to effective antibiotic treatment. Polyphosphate kinase 1 (PPK1) is an enzyme responsible for inorganic polyphosphate synthesis and plays a vital role in regulating various physiological processes in bacteria. In this study, we investigated the impact of polyP metabolism on the biofilm and capsule formation and virulence traits in hvKP using Dictyostelium discoideum amoeba as a model host. We found that the PPK1 null mutant was impaired in biofilm and capsule formation and showed attenuated virulence in D. discoideum compared to the wild-type strain. We performed a proteomic analysis to gain further insights into the underlying molecular mechanism. The results revealed that the PPK1 mutant had a differential expression of proteins involved in capsule synthesis (Wzi-Ugd), biofilm formation (MrkC-D-H), synthesis of the colibactin genotoxin precursor (ClbB), as well as proteins associated with the synthesis and modification of lipid A (ArnB-LpxC-PagP). These proteomic findings corroborate the phenotypic observations and indicate that the PPK1 mutation is associated with impaired biofilm and capsule formation and attenuated virulence in hvKP. Overall, our study highlights the importance of polyP synthesis in regulating extracellular biomolecules and virulence in K. pneumoniae and provides insights into potential therapeutic targets for treating K. pneumoniae infections
    corecore