8 research outputs found

    Initial spreading of low-viscosity drops on partially wetting surfaces

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    Liquid drops start spreading directly after brought into contact with a partial wetting substrate. Although this phenomenon involves a three-phase contact line, the spreading motion is very fast. We study the initial spreading dynamics of low-viscosity drops, using two complementary methods: Molecular Dynamics simulations and high-speed imaging. We access previously unexplored length- and time-scales, and provide a detailed picture on how the initial contact between the liquid drop and the solid is established. Both methods unambiguously point towards a spreading regime that is independent of wettability, with the contact radius growing as the square root of time

    Bubble formation during the collision of a sessile drop with a meniscus

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    The impact of a sessile droplet with a moving meniscus, as encountered in processes such as dip-coating, generically leads to the entrapment of small air bubbles. Here we experimentally study this process of bubble formation by looking through the liquid using high-speed imaging. Our central finding is that the size of the entrapped bubble crucially depends on the location where coalescence between the drop and the moving meniscus is initiated: (i) at a finite height above the substrate, or (ii) exactly at the contact line. In the first case, we typically find bubble sizes of the order of a few microns, independent of the size and speed of the impacting drop. By contrast, the bubbles that are formed when coalescence starts at the contact line become increasingly large, as the size or the velocity of the impacting drop is increased. We show how these observations can be explained from a balance between the lubrication pressure in the air layer and the capillary pressure of the drop

    Oscillating and star-shaped drops levitated by an air-flow

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    We investigate the spontaneous oscillations of drops levitated above an air cushion, eventually inducing a breaking of axisymmetry and the appearance of ‚Äústar drops‚ÄĚ. This is strongly reminiscent of the Leidenfrost stars that are observed for drops floating above a hot substrate. The key advantage of this work is that we inject the airflow at a constant rate below the drop, thus eliminating thermal effects and allowing for a better control of the flow rate. We perform experiments with drops of different viscosities and observe stable states, oscillations, and chimney instabilities. We find that for a given drop size the instability appears above a critical flow rate, where the latter is largest for small drops. All these observations are reproduced by numerical simulations, where we treat the drop using potential flow and the gas as a viscous lubrication layer. Qualitatively, the onset of instability agrees with the experimental results, although the typical flow rates are too large by a factor 10. Our results demonstrate that thermal effects are not important for the formation of star drops and strongly suggest a purely hydrodynamic mechanism for the formation of Leidenfrost stars

    Maximal air bubble entrainment at liquid drop impact

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    At impact of a liquid drop on a solid surface an air bubble can be entrapped. Here we show that two competing effects minimize the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: For large drop impact velocity and large droplets the inertia of the liquid flattens the entrained bubble, whereas for small impact velocity and small droplets capillary forces minimize the entrained bubble. However, we demonstrate experimentally, theoretically, and numerically that in between there is an optimum, leading to maximal air bubble entrapment. Our results have a strong bearing on various applications in printing technology, microelectronics, immersion lithography, diagnostics, or agriculture.Comment: 4 page

    Measurement of jet fragmentation in Pb+Pb and pppp collisions at sNN=2.76\sqrt{{s_\mathrm{NN}}} = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

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