114 research outputs found

    Market Reach and Advertising Medium: Assessing How Students Learn about Research Services

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    Promotion of services is something we discuss often in libraries; however, it is rare to find a comprehensive promotion plan for research services or any evaluation of promotional services beyond case studies of a specific promotion. How do we know where to place our time and efforts if we have not assessed how students learn about research services? In the 2015-2016 academic year, the Library Research Services department at the University of Northern Colorado Libraries set out to answer this question. Surveys were sent to individuals contacting a librarian for in-depth research assistance. The goal of this survey was to determine how those who contacted members of the department for research assistance heard of our services; with this knowledge, the department plans to better target populations for promotion of services

    The Disappearance of Controlled Vocabulary in Bibliographic Instruction: \u3ci\u3eIn Memoriam\u3c/i\u3e?

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    At one time controlled vocabulary was an essential component of bibliographic instruction sessions. Today, whispered conversations among librarians and the lack of conference presentations, blog posts, and professional literature on the best use of controlled vocabulary seemingly indicate an evanescence of this content. Yet professional communication channels are also silent on the disappearance of controlled vocabulary. In this session, the presenter will share preliminary results of a regional survey of librarians concerning current instruction trends for controlled vocabulary. Attendees will discuss whether controlled vocabulary still has a place in bibliographic instruction

    Move Aside Scotty, Jing is the Thing: Individualized Student-Created Tutorial Collections, Performance Assessment, and Easy Instructor Feedback

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    If only Scotty could beam us around the world, to wherever and whenever students need our help… But, wait, there\u27s Jing freeware! Engage students in video creation for performance assessment as they build personalized libraries of research tutorials. But, wait, there\u27s more! Address and correct errors in class assignments in seconds. But, wait, there\u27s more! Create individualized instruction for students not enrolled in information literacy courses and videos as follow-ups to one-shot sessions. Attend this session and discover a new frontier of easy and efficient online video utilization for instruction

    Copyright, Licensing, & Attribution for Affordable Course Readings & Open Educational Resources

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    This session is broken into three parts: copyright, Creative Commons licensing, and the complexity of attributions. Join us for a discussion of issues you need to consider in using Affordable Course Readings and/or OER in your courses. These are each complex issues that cannot be delved deeply in a single session; rather these discussions are meant to spur questions and ideas of what your needs and responsibilities are in using these materials

    Taking the First Steps Toward Textbook Affordability: Building Course Readings from Library Resources and Course Reserves

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    Faculty and instructors have a strong history of using library materials and library course reserves to supplement a course textbook for pedagogical reasons – to fill in knowledge gaps and to customize course content for their students. Many faculty may not recognize these practices as cost-saving measures for student – but using library materials and library course reserves does reduce costs. Have you ever considered building an entire textbook or course reading list out of library resources and library course reserves, and reducing your students’ textbook costs to $0? Do the UNC Libraries already provide multiple-user access to textbooks, chapters, articles, and other tools on your course topics? Could a few chapters from different textbooks create a new textbook that could be posted on UNC Libraries Course Reserves for your students at no cost and stay within the bounds of the fair use exception of Copyright law? Join us to explore the possibilities

    More than Evaluation: Student Nurses and Their Ability to Assess Online Health Resources and Verbalize Findings

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    Purpose The Internet poses both a frontier that represents the possibility for vast exploration and an open space that leaves patients wandering through unreliable information. The purpose of this study was to determine the abilities of first-year (Junior-standing) nursing students to choose, evaluate and then explain their findings in relation to health information on the Web. Setting/Subjects 108 first-year nursing students in Foundations I at the University of Northern Colorado. Methodology Content analysis of written papers. Results Evaluation comprised of three cohorts (consisting of 36 students each) of first-year nursing students in Foundations I in their assessment of 216 websites. Each student was charged with researching a health topic and recommending one reliable website and censuring another website concerning the same health topic, with the objective of identifying, evaluating and verbalizing health information for patients. Although the majority of students are skillful in assessment of online information, their ability to verbalize their conclusions is lacking. Discussion & Conclusion For future nurses it is not only the information and content analysis that is important, but also the ability to communicate this information to patients and family members. The current generation of nursing students is incredibly web-savvy, but they still need practice in communication

    Exploding Head Syndrome: Engaging Students through Real-Life Examples

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    Although students have a difficult time verbalizing why a source is reliable and scholarly (or why it is not), they often declare the information as good or bad with ease, and are often correct in their determination. The struggle becomes great when they must determine when enough information is enough. In this session, attendees will learn of some real-life examples that can be worked through with students to illustrate when and why finding more information is a good idea. The main example centers on nursing undergraduates and embedded Information Literacy sessions in their foundation classes. Most of these students are now considered health professionals in the eyes of their families and friends – and thus are often asked questions dealing with health concerns that run the gamut. The challenge: To help students recognize that finding information is only the first step; they must then evaluate that information and determine if they need more; and in the process turn information into knowledge that they can apply to the situation. The solution: To present students with real-life, relevant, and memorable examples, in which they must determine what choices to make and what consequences those choices will produce. The students become engaged when they understand that having the right – or the wrong – information can seriously impact their lives, and not just a grade on a paper

    Anatomy of a Research Article

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    CC BY Experiments and observations are the fundamental building blocks for scientific knowledge - knowledge that informs data-driven decision making and evidence-based practice. Scientists often tell each other of their experiments and observations through research articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Research articles are formatted in a very specific manner that follows the process of the research process. This handout offers an overview the eight sections seen in most research articles

    Student Learning: An Assessment of Information Literacy Learning in Nursing Research One-Shots

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    Background The objective of this research is to assess student learning in a library one-shot for Nursing students who are beginning to navigate the scholarly research system and to identify and procure primary and secondary research studies to support a clinical change. Methods NURS 380 is the research and evidence-based practice course for second-year nursing students taken in concert with clinical experiences. Three sections of this course (36 students each) were given the same lecture, hands-on practice, and facilitated research time with the same librarian during a three-hour session of the course. At the end of each session, the librarian used a Classroom Assessment Technique (non-graded, anonymous, and in-class) to collect data on student learning. Results Results of this research are pending. The data is being analyzed currently. It is hypothesized that student reports will indicate learning library research methods that can be directly mapped to the student learning outcomes of the session. Conclusions This study offers a teaching plan (overview and lesson plans) and an assessment of student learning with those materials. Although Classroom Assessment Techniques are generally simple by design and an economical method for gathering data for formative assessment, they offer rich feedback for both professor and librarian on which to build future teaching and learning

    Evidence in the Literature: Efficiently Searching the Collective Knowledge

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    Search effectively. Search efficiently. Find the evidence you need as a healthcare professional to provide the best care to patients. This session will include timesaving tips and tricks to identify and access relevant literature for the decision-making process. A healthcare provider must focus on integrating appropriate evidence with expert knowledge and patient needs; a librarian can help healthcare providers cut through the static and find the best resources. Join this session to discuss the most useful types of literature, pertinent research databases, effective search strategies, and methods for getting your hands on the resources you need
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